The Briefly for November 19, 2018 – The “MTA is On the Edge of a Death Spiral” Edition

Holding affordable housing hostage in Brooklyn, Prospect Park Lake’s “Floating Goat,” plans to privatize the NYCHA’s operations, the best burgers in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The house of the man who designed Central Park and Prospect Park sits in ruin on Staten Island. The New York Landmarks Conservancy is looking to restore Frederick Law Olmsted’s house and launched a Kickstarter to get it started. (Untapped Cities)

Here are the two options for the MTA fare hikes headed our way in 2019 as the entire system sits on the edge of a death spiral. (Second Ave Sagas)

A developer in Crown Heights is holding affordable units hostage if the city does not approve an upzoning their new development. (Bklyner)

In some parts of the city, limits on Community Board term-limits is a cause for concern when board seats already have a difficult time being filled. (Bronx Times)

If you’re questioning just how progressive de Blasio really is based on his support of Amazon’s LIC HQ2, you’re not alone. (The Real Deal)

The 24 best burgers in the city. (Eater)

Does the Sanitation Department’s boss, Kathryn Garcia, have too much on her plate? On top of being responsible for the city’s trash removal and snow-removal, the mayor also named her as the person to combat toxic lead across the city. (NY Post)

Can the private sector save the NYCHA? That’s exactly what is being considered. The plan would hand over management of repairs and renovations, but it will also sell unused air rights to develop new apartments on underused NYCHA land. (Curbed)

Signal work on the 7 train that started in 2010 is finally scheduled to finish at the end of the month. The work will allow extra trips when the L train shuts down in April. (Jackson Heights Post)

Why are some portions of Manhattan devoid of skyscrapers? The reason is less geological and more financial. (Laughing Squid)

1,500 affordable apartments were headed for LIC, but a certain online retailer’s plans for new offices have put that in jeopardy. (6sqft)

Breathe in, watch the mandarin duck in Central Park swimming in the snow, breathe out. (@notfapgod69)

What is “The Floating Goat” in Prospect Park Lake? (amNY)

The 25-year history of the Union Square Holiday Market. (6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio fired the chief of the Department of Investigations, and it’s hard to see that it was anything but a personal vendetta against a former friend. (NY Times)

The North Face’s new prototype store in Williamsburg includes a custom-scent made to remind you of Yosemite National Park. (Bedford + Bowery)

The stories of the stray cats of Red Hood. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

A checklist of restaurants and bars to check out before the L train shuts down, but make sure to check that the L train is actually running before venturing out. (amNY)

The best (and worst) spots to watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. (amNY)

The city is no longer without an FAO Schwarz. (Untapped Cities)

The chief responsible for the Harvey Weinstein case who led the NYPD’s special victim’s division (not executive produced by Dick Wolf) has been ousted. His replacement will be Deputy Chief Judith Harrison. (NY Times)

Despite the chaos and insane traffic during last week’s snow storm, the subway was… surprisingly functional. (NY Post)

Panna II, one of the city’s worst-reviewed restaurants, is one of the hottest reservations in the city. (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for November 1, 2018 – The “We Need A New Bushwick We Ruined this One” Edition

Midtown is getting a makeover, Shakespeare in the Park goes dark in 2021, the city bungled their voting information mailer, the NYPD vs a swan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Photos from the Village Halloween parade. (amNY)

Here’s what you need to know about the election on November 6. (Brokelyn)

Is the closing of Bushwick art gallery Signal the canary in a coal mine for the decline of the neighborhood? Signal closes on November 2 after their final show, “No Signal.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Governor Cuomo restored voting rights to most parolees in April, but someone forgot to tell the city’s Board of Elections, who printed the wrong information in the City Voter Guide mailers. (Bklyner)

2 Penn Plaza is about to get a dramatic revamp starting in 2020. Get ready for midtown to look very different. (Curbed)

All 128 NYC restaurants that were awarded Bib Gourmand status in 2019 (two courses and a glass of wine or dessert is under $40). (Eater)

How many NYPD officers does it take to capture a swan? Watch the video and see. (Gothamist)

Get ready for tight security at the NYC Marathon this Sunday. (Queens Gazette)

The newest addition to the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade’s balloons is “Little Cloud” from the art duo FriendsWithYou, a happy little optimistic cloud. (NY Times)

The creator of the MetroCard, William Wheeler, swiped his last swipe at 69. He worked for the MTA for 32 years and is one of the reasons we don’t still use tokens. (NY Post)

19 bars and restaurants in Astoria to try. (Eater)

Take a tour and dip into the history of of Red Hook’s Erie Basin. (Forgotten NY)

The new Greenpoint Library will not open in December as scheduled due to discoveries of asbestos and the remains of the original Carnegie Library from 1906. (Bklyner)

Check out every publicly accessible waterfront in the city with the interactive Waterfront Access Map. (Curbed)

Shakespeare in the Park will go dark in 2021 when the Delacourt undergoes a $110 million renovation. The renovation is meant to address issues like how the women’s bathroom is extremely far from the amphitheater, making it ADA compliant, and other needed improvements to the stage and backstage areas. Construction is set to being in 2020 and finish in 2022. (NY Times)

Alan Cumming is tending bar. “Why would you want to have a bar otherwise?”

The elevated trains in New York date back to 1868, when the Eiffel Tower was brand new. The trains moved between five and ten miles an hour, which is still faster than the average speed of a Manhattan bus. (Curbed)

City Lab attended the L Train Shutdown Nightmare “experience” before it prematurely closed. They were less than impressed.

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for September 19, 2018 – Flood Rat is the New Pizza Rat

Flood rat, over 100 city school bus drivers had no background checks, protests over ritualistic killing of chickens in the streets, and more

Forget Pizza Rat, Flood Rat is our new mayor.

The ritualistic slaughter of chickens in Crown Heights by the Orthodox Jewish community was met with protest from people believe that swinging a live chicken over your head and then beheading it is cruel. Roughly 50,000 chickens are killed in ad-hoc slaughter houses throughout Crown Heights, Williamsburg, and Borough Park and in the past those animals have ended up in the garbage.

The city’s ubiquitous temporary construction fences are going to get a makeover. The Department of Cultural Affairs launched a pilot program calling for artwork to live on temporary fencing. You can apply through October 12.

$4.1 million is being set aside by the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs to provide legal assistance for unaccompanied and separated migrant children who are still in New York.

The new Museum of Street Art pays tribute to 5 Pointz, and it’s in the stairwells at the citizenM hotel. The curator is the former 5 Pointz spokeswoman Marie Flageul.

We’re all aware the subway doesn’t know how to handle heavy rain, but these videos compiled by the NY Post shows just how screwed the subways were during the remnants of Hurricane Florence.

19 stand-out restaurants and bars in Red Hook, from Eater.

Are Bill de Blasio and Andrew Cuomo ready to hug it out? The mayor spoke at a Democrat rally on Tuesday and while he didn’t verbally endorse Cuomo for Governor, his spokesman says his speech was an endorsement.

The city gave out 21 million condoms in the year ending June 30, down from 35 million the previous year. The de Blasio administration is blaming the difference on a decrease of federal funding towards traditional safe sex products.

The impact of Schneps Communications purchasing CNG (the local news publication consolidation reported on last week) is less reporters covering certain neighborhoods in the city.

Four men who were repeatedly sexually abused as children by a religion teacher at a Catholic church in Brooklyn received a $27.5 million settlement from the Diocese of Brooklyn in one of the largest settlements ever awarded to individual victims of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church.

The DOE is investigated allegations that more than 100 people were approved to work as city school-bus drivers without any background checks.

Do you know about the ramp in Forest Hills? Atlas Obscura tells the story about the meeting place of The Ramones before they were The Ramones, which now bears a mural of the iconic band by Ori Carino.

Meet the v good dogs that protect Amtrak at Penn Station.


Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.