The Briefly for November 1, 2018 – The “We Need A New Bushwick We Ruined this One” Edition

Midtown is getting a makeover, Shakespeare in the Park goes dark in 2021, the city bungled their voting information mailer, the NYPD vs a swan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Photos from the Village Halloween parade. (amNY)

Here’s what you need to know about the election on November 6. (Brokelyn)

Is the closing of Bushwick art gallery Signal the canary in a coal mine for the decline of the neighborhood? Signal closes on November 2 after their final show, “No Signal.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Governor Cuomo restored voting rights to most parolees in April, but someone forgot to tell the city’s Board of Elections, who printed the wrong information in the City Voter Guide mailers. (Bklyner)

2 Penn Plaza is about to get a dramatic revamp starting in 2020. Get ready for midtown to look very different. (Curbed)

All 128 NYC restaurants that were awarded Bib Gourmand status in 2019 (two courses and a glass of wine or dessert is under $40). (Eater)

How many NYPD officers does it take to capture a swan? Watch the video and see. (Gothamist)

Get ready for tight security at the NYC Marathon this Sunday. (Queens Gazette)

The newest addition to the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade’s balloons is “Little Cloud” from the art duo FriendsWithYou, a happy little optimistic cloud. (NY Times)

The creator of the MetroCard, William Wheeler, swiped his last swipe at 69. He worked for the MTA for 32 years and is one of the reasons we don’t still use tokens. (NY Post)

19 bars and restaurants in Astoria to try. (Eater)

Take a tour and dip into the history of of Red Hook’s Erie Basin. (Forgotten NY)

The new Greenpoint Library will not open in December as scheduled due to discoveries of asbestos and the remains of the original Carnegie Library from 1906. (Bklyner)

Check out every publicly accessible waterfront in the city with the interactive Waterfront Access Map. (Curbed)

Shakespeare in the Park will go dark in 2021 when the Delacourt undergoes a $110 million renovation. The renovation is meant to address issues like how the women’s bathroom is extremely far from the amphitheater, making it ADA compliant, and other needed improvements to the stage and backstage areas. Construction is set to being in 2020 and finish in 2022. (NY Times)

Alan Cumming is tending bar. “Why would you want to have a bar otherwise?”

The elevated trains in New York date back to 1868, when the Eiffel Tower was brand new. The trains moved between five and ten miles an hour, which is still faster than the average speed of a Manhattan bus. (Curbed)

City Lab attended the L Train Shutdown Nightmare “experience” before it prematurely closed. They were less than impressed.

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The Briefly for September 19, 2018 – Flood Rat is the New Pizza Rat

Flood rat, over 100 city school bus drivers had no background checks, protests over ritualistic killing of chickens in the streets, and more

Forget Pizza Rat, Flood Rat is our new mayor.

The ritualistic slaughter of chickens in Crown Heights by the Orthodox Jewish community was met with protest from people believe that swinging a live chicken over your head and then beheading it is cruel. Roughly 50,000 chickens are killed in ad-hoc slaughter houses throughout Crown Heights, Williamsburg, and Borough Park and in the past those animals have ended up in the garbage.

The city’s ubiquitous temporary construction fences are going to get a makeover. The Department of Cultural Affairs launched a pilot program calling for artwork to live on temporary fencing. You can apply through October 12.

$4.1 million is being set aside by the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs to provide legal assistance for unaccompanied and separated migrant children who are still in New York.

The new Museum of Street Art pays tribute to 5 Pointz, and it’s in the stairwells at the citizenM hotel. The curator is the former 5 Pointz spokeswoman Marie Flageul.

We’re all aware the subway doesn’t know how to handle heavy rain, but these videos compiled by the NY Post shows just how screwed the subways were during the remnants of Hurricane Florence.

19 stand-out restaurants and bars in Red Hook, from Eater.

Are Bill de Blasio and Andrew Cuomo ready to hug it out? The mayor spoke at a Democrat rally on Tuesday and while he didn’t verbally endorse Cuomo for Governor, his spokesman says his speech was an endorsement.

The city gave out 21 million condoms in the year ending June 30, down from 35 million the previous year. The de Blasio administration is blaming the difference on a decrease of federal funding towards traditional safe sex products.

The impact of Schneps Communications purchasing CNG (the local news publication consolidation reported on last week) is less reporters covering certain neighborhoods in the city.

Four men who were repeatedly sexually abused as children by a religion teacher at a Catholic church in Brooklyn received a $27.5 million settlement from the Diocese of Brooklyn in one of the largest settlements ever awarded to individual victims of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church.

The DOE is investigated allegations that more than 100 people were approved to work as city school-bus drivers without any background checks.

Do you know about the ramp in Forest Hills? Atlas Obscura tells the story about the meeting place of The Ramones before they were The Ramones, which now bears a mural of the iconic band by Ori Carino.

Meet the v good dogs that protect Amtrak at Penn Station.


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The Briefly for July 26, 2018 – Summer Streets, Ample Hills in Red Hook, Target Apologizes, and More

Target apologizes to thin-skinned punks, Ample Hills has a new ice cream factory/store/museum in Red Hook, Brooklyn’s Native American ironworkers built this city, Yelp is including health inspection ratings, and more.

Are you sitting down? Rent for one- and two-bedroom apartments are on the decline according to Zumper’s summer report.

One of Manhattan’s original survey bolts from 1811 is still embedded in a rock in Central Park but it’s location remains a secret to protect it from being damaged, destroyed, or removed.

A guide to Summer Streets, from Curbed.

“It’s a garbage book and you’re a garbage person.” Sean Spicer’s book tour stop in the city didn’t go as planned.

More than 90 percent of the people busted in the city for marijuana possession in the 2018 were people of color. The city’s new policy on pot arrests takes effect in September.

A dead body was found near Trump’s gold course in the Bronx.

Dov Bechhofer, a radiologist at Montefiore Medical Center, is suspended while the hospital investigates accusations of having white supremacist views.

Filming around town: John Wick 3 is at 41st and 8th, Madam Secretary w/Tea Leoni is at 65th and Park, The Deuce w/Maggie Gyllenhaal is at 164th and Amsterdam, Gotham is at W 36th and 5th, Netflix and Marvel’s The Punisher is at Butler St and 4th Ave in Brooklyn, and Law and Order: SVU is around Atlantic Ave and Hicks St in Brooklyn.

The legal questions around CBD, answered by Gothamist.

The city’s next big food hall will be at LaGuardia Airport.

NYCHA admitted it’s non-compliance on many issues after years of lying.

Target apologized for your hurt feelings about its one day nod to CBGB during the store opening in the East Village.

This exhibition has everything. Cryptocurreny. Bushwick. Blockchain. Missing vowels in a company’s name. UGH.

Governor Cuomo blames Marty Golden for state Republicans’ inability to pass the Every School Speed Safety Camera Act. Golden claims to support the bill, but his support has been all talk and no action.

Yelp now has health scores for restaurants in the city. “Grade Pending” is replaced by “Z,” which indicates failure.

Only five stations are handicap accessible on the J, Z, M, and L trains in Brooklyn, buses have traditionally been talked about as an alternative, but have had increasingly poor service.

Ample Hills’ new ice cream factory, museum, and store in Red Hook opens today.

If it was tall and made of iron, it was likely built by Brooklyn’s Mohawk Native American ironworkers who are still contributing to the city’s skyline today.

Scott Michael Johnson is the 1,642 identified victim in the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center. His remains were identified using DNA testing.