The Briefly for June 28, 2019 – The “These Could Be the Grossest Places in the City” Edition

Subway disruptions during WorldPride, LaGuardia’s Airtrain gets a $2 billion price tag, NYC declares a climate emergency, and more today in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The MTA promised “full service” during WorldPride this weekend. That is, of course, mostly a lie and there are disruptions on 9 subway lines this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

The city’s 53 pools are officially open! (Time Out)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s influence in the Queens DA primary was invaluable to Tiffany Caban, and since AOC won her own primary that took her to Congress, she’s learned to master Washington DC’s game on her own terms. (Politico)

No matter how gross you think the city’s public restrooms are inside of parks, you’d be making an under-estimation. (Gothamist)

The real estate industry is planning on making a constitutional challenge to the state’s rent reform laws, arguing their fifth amendment rights were violated, in an attempt o shot the case to the Supreme Court as quickly as possible. (The Real Deal)

How does the city prioritize road improvements? Take a look at the two streets recently paved in Willets Point and you might find your answer. In preparation for a film shoot, the Department of Transportation rolled out the blacktop carpet. (Queens Crap)

The City Council joined over 600 other localities around the world in declaring a climate emergencytaken its place in the Manhattan County Courthouse, thanks to the Municipal Art Society of NYC’s “Adopt A Monument/Mural” program. (Untapped Cities)

An argument in favor of the peanut butter ice being the flavor of the city’s summer. (Grub Street)

A look at the state legislature’s failed attempt to legalize marijuana through the lens of the Cuomo Catch-22. Everything is too early to talk about until it’s too late to consider. (Gothamist)

The best friend chicken in the city is on Avenue C. The top 20 friend chicken spots in the city. (Grub Street)

A fourth NYPD officer committed suicide in the last month. (Patch)

The state is waiting on the governor’s signature on a bill that would require the makers of floss, tampons, pads, condoms, menstrual cups, and other similar products (floss really stands out as the outlier in that list, right?) to list the ingredients used similar to how it’s done with food in an attempt to force companies to reduce the number of toxic materials used in their products. (Gothamist)

After the demolition of its most historic structures, what does Red Hook’s future look like? (Curbed)

Seven people were arrested in a drug bust in Bushwick that was focused on heroin being sold near an elementary school and inside of the Bushwick Houses public housing development. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

All of NYC’s Congressional delegates are asking NYC Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza to conduct lead-dust testing in public school buildings after a WNYC investigation found lead four schools. In addition, they asked for the results to be made public, and to have a plan to move students in schools where lead-dust is found. The mayor, instead of supporting their calls, is questioning the test WNYC employed. (Gothamist)

The Knuffle Bunny, a character created by Park Slope’s Mo Willems, will live in bronze statue form outside of the Brooklyn Public Library’s Park Slope branch. (amNY)

The New York Botanical Garden’s corpse flower started to open on Thursday at 2pm, so if you hurry you can still experience that “rotting meat in the sun” scent. (Gothamist)

Take a look at the designs of the LaGuardia Airport of the future that will bring it in line with “New York standards,” according to the governor. Hopefully, he’s referring to a different set of standards we have for the subways. (Gothamist)

The LaGuardia AirTrain’s cost was estimated at $450 million in 2014. In 2019? We’ve just arrived at $2.05 billion. (amNY)

The mayor stepped out of the debate in Miami and firmly planted his foot in his mouth when “accidentally” quoting Che Guevara. Now the entire country gets to feel what only city residents have felt. (NY Times)

If you’ve been outside Hook & Ladder 8 (Ghostbusters HQ), you’re seeing the remnants of Paul Rudd’s announcement that he’ll be in the next Ghostbusters movie. (Gothamist)

If you’re still stinging from being left out in the cold by MoviePass, the Alamo Drafthouse in Brooklyn is testing out a Season Pass at the cost between $20 or $30 a month. (BrooklynVegan)

There’s a small area of Bed Stuy that’s been plagued with a mysterious sound that’s been causing hangover-like headaches for more than a month. (Patch)

It’s so hot (how hot is it?) that the DOT was hosing down the Metropolitan Ave bridge because it wouldn’t close because of the heat. (Gothamist)

Video: Decoding the secret language of the city’s street signs, numbers, and letters. (Quartz)

Say hello to the baby peregrine falcons near the Bayonne Bridge who recently made their first flights. They have been given the World War II-themed names Rosie, Martha, And Juno. (Gothamist)

Google is trying to predict how crowded your subway, bus, or train will be. Even if they only ever displayed “very crowded,” it would be believable. (amNY)

A very specific list: Where to go when confronting your BFF about sleeping with your crush. (Eater)

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The Briefly for March 13, 2019 – The “Despite All My Rage I Am Still Just a Rat in a MetroCard Machine” Edition

The Hell’s Angels are leaving the East Village, inside Hudson Yards before the Friday opening, the Brooklyn Botanical Garden is fighting a rezoning, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Starting tonight you can see a live satellite video of the earth projected on the side of 159 Ludlow on the Lower East Side. The installation, called “blu Marble” is the work of Sebastian Errazuriz. (Bedford + Bowery)

New York has higher taxes than almost every other state, and we still cann’t fix the MTA. (Patch)

The MTA version of a double rainbow is the rat inside a MetroCard machine. (@SMarketingmusic) h/t to @theskint

The measles outbreak in the city’s ultra-Orthodox Jewish community can be traced back to a dial-in hotline for moms which spread misinformation. (NY Times)

186 arrests and 64 convictions have come from the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office initiative to test backlogged rape kits across the US. 55,000 kits have been tested since the project started in 2015. (NY Post)

The Trump administration is proposed decreasing the HUD budget by 16.4%, which could wind up being a massive hit to NYCHA’s federal funding. (Curbed)

The Trump Administration also balked on funding the Gateway rail project, calling the project a “local responsibility.” (6sqft)

A look inside the abandoned Time Square Theater. (Untapped Cities)

Some very good dogs will lead a blind runner through the NYC Half Marathon this weekend. (amNY)

State Senator Zellnor Myrie introduced a bill in the State Senate to restrict campaign contributions from anyone seeking government contracts and bar prospective vendors from contributing for six months after a contract is granted by the state. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The Brooklyn Botanical Garden is fighting against a 1,578 apartment development’s rezoning request. If approved, the pair of 39-story towers would cast a problematic shadow over 21 grow spaces and nurseries. The current zoning allows for 75-foot buildings. (6sqft)

A guide to this Sunday’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. (amNY)

The nutball restaurateur who flew himself to Seattle to try to convince Amazon to reconsider Long Island City isn’t done yet. Now he’s suing Councilperson Jimmy Van Brammer for defamation. (Gothamist)

Trump supporters created their own version of Yelp for MAGA-friendly businesses. While you could use the app to find these places, you can also use it to avoid them.. (The Daily Beast)

Ten-year-old Khadijah Sabir from Bensonhurst needs a new kidney. If you can help, please help. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The cleanup of the Red Hook ball fields resumed after the federal government shutdown. The EPA will remove six inches of soil and add 12 inches of clean fill and astroturf will cover all the fields. The last phase of the cleanup will be finished by spring 2023. (Bklyner)

A history of the Greenpoint piers. (Greenpointers)

Take a look inside Hudson Yards’ seven-story dining and shopping center ahead of Friday’s opening. (6sqft)

Multiple city burgers made it to this list of 35 burgers you need to eat before you die with Harlem Public’s Peanut Butter Burger topping the list. (Food Insider)

The BQE reconstruction, explained. (Curbed)

Everyone’s getting in on the history of the White Horse Tavern articles this week. Here’s another. (Gothamist)

How do NYC’s graduate schools rank among the top in the country? Hopefully as well as our burgers. (Patch)

No one is allowed to shower or use or drink the water at Brooklyn’s Methodist Hospital in Park Slope four months after a legionella bacteria outbreak in December. Anti-bacterial wipes have replaced hand washing and even showers. (Patch)

13,000 nurses could strike this month if negotiations fail between the New York State Nurses Association and a group of three major hospital systems. (Gotham Gazette)

The Hell’s Angels are vacating their East Village clubhouse, which they purchased in $1,700. The building was transferred for an unknown amount. Did you know the Hell’s Angels is a non-profit religious group in New York State? (Downtown Express)

Where to go when you don’t want to make a big deal about your birthday, but you actually do. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for November 19, 2018 – The “MTA is On the Edge of a Death Spiral” Edition

Holding affordable housing hostage in Brooklyn, Prospect Park Lake’s “Floating Goat,” plans to privatize the NYCHA’s operations, the best burgers in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The house of the man who designed Central Park and Prospect Park sits in ruin on Staten Island. The New York Landmarks Conservancy is looking to restore Frederick Law Olmsted’s house and launched a Kickstarter to get it started. (Untapped Cities)

Here are the two options for the MTA fare hikes headed our way in 2019 as the entire system sits on the edge of a death spiral. (Second Ave Sagas)

A developer in Crown Heights is holding affordable units hostage if the city does not approve an upzoning their new development. (Bklyner)

In some parts of the city, limits on Community Board term-limits is a cause for concern when board seats already have a difficult time being filled. (Bronx Times)

If you’re questioning just how progressive de Blasio really is based on his support of Amazon’s LIC HQ2, you’re not alone. (The Real Deal)

The 24 best burgers in the city. (Eater)

Does the Sanitation Department’s boss, Kathryn Garcia, have too much on her plate? On top of being responsible for the city’s trash removal and snow-removal, the mayor also named her as the person to combat toxic lead across the city. (NY Post)

Can the private sector save the NYCHA? That’s exactly what is being considered. The plan would hand over management of repairs and renovations, but it will also sell unused air rights to develop new apartments on underused NYCHA land. (Curbed)

Signal work on the 7 train that started in 2010 is finally scheduled to finish at the end of the month. The work will allow extra trips when the L train shuts down in April. (Jackson Heights Post)

Why are some portions of Manhattan devoid of skyscrapers? The reason is less geological and more financial. (Laughing Squid)

1,500 affordable apartments were headed for LIC, but a certain online retailer’s plans for new offices have put that in jeopardy. (6sqft)

Breathe in, watch the mandarin duck in Central Park swimming in the snow, breathe out. (@notfapgod69)

What is “The Floating Goat” in Prospect Park Lake? (amNY)

The 25-year history of the Union Square Holiday Market. (6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio fired the chief of the Department of Investigations, and it’s hard to see that it was anything but a personal vendetta against a former friend. (NY Times)

The North Face’s new prototype store in Williamsburg includes a custom-scent made to remind you of Yosemite National Park. (Bedford + Bowery)

The stories of the stray cats of Red Hood. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

A checklist of restaurants and bars to check out before the L train shuts down, but make sure to check that the L train is actually running before venturing out. (amNY)

The best (and worst) spots to watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. (amNY)

The city is no longer without an FAO Schwarz. (Untapped Cities)

The chief responsible for the Harvey Weinstein case who led the NYPD’s special victim’s division (not executive produced by Dick Wolf) has been ousted. His replacement will be Deputy Chief Judith Harrison. (NY Times)

Despite the chaos and insane traffic during last week’s snow storm, the subway was… surprisingly functional. (NY Post)

Panna II, one of the city’s worst-reviewed restaurants, is one of the hottest reservations in the city. (Thrillist)

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