The Briefly for January 27, 2020 – The “Don’t Lean on the Subway Doors Today” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Brooklyn Flea revives the Chelsea Flea Market, Rafael Espinal quits City Council, $1,000 basement sleep pods, a library reording studio, and more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 45˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

The real estate lobby is already calling for changes and exceptions to the city’s law reducing emissions 40% by 2030 and 80% by 2050. The law passed in May of 2019. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

New legislation could extend voting rights to Green Card holders and noncitizens with work authorization in municipal elections. There are 660,000 New Yorkers that hold Green Cards. 27 council members support the bill, but Corey Johnson hasn’t expressed support yet. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

The R179 subway trains that were removed from service last month are back and safe, according to the MTA. The blame fell on the doors not being properly calibrated, but maybe don’t lean on the subway doors anymore. (Alejandra O-Connel-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Under the elevated tracks in Queens remains a dangerous place to be, as a bolt fell from the N/W tracks in Astoria, shattering a car’s sunroof. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

It hasn’t fully set in, but the reality of Train Daddy’s resignation is starting to wash over the city. Corey Johnson called his resignation a “crisis.” (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

A list of Byford’s biggest achievements during his two years. (Jake Offenhartz and Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Byford isn’t the only person leaving the MTA. Pete Tomlin is also resigning. Tomlin isn’t nearly as well known, but he’s an expert in signals and was the signals chief. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The Fairway in Red Hook has been there since 2006, but its future is in doubt. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

An ode to the metal rat, this year’s lunar mascot. (Madeline Leung Coleman for Jezebel)

Three people in New York state have tested positive for Corona virus, and according to the mayor it’ll come to the city “sooner or later.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Here’s what you need to know about the Coronavirus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A Hershey Bar has a new meaning, as Hershey’s has opened a bar in the Barclays Center that serves alcoholic drinks made with Hershey’s, Reese’s, and Jolly Rancher products. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Did you know there is a recording studio in the central branch fo the Brooklyn Pubic Library? (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Continuing from the Stonewall Democratic Club’s endorsement of Elizabeth Warren, Lambda Independent Democrats of Brooklyn endorsed Warren and Jim Owles Liberal Democratic Club endorsed Bernie Sanders. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The Chelsea Flea Market is making a return under new management. The Brooklyn Flea has a new lease for the parking lot location and will be inviting original vendors back for the same prices. As the Brooklyn Flea does, they have announced that they will also be inviting food vendors, but it will not be the focus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

There’s a movement brewing to revoke the permits for the Brooklyn Flea’s Smorgasburg event during July or August to give locals in Williamsburg unfettered use of East River State Park. There are no plans for that in 2020. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Queens has a new speakeasy, the new Astoria’s Secret is hidden behind the facade of The Lingere Shoppe. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The real question about Byford’s departure. Will your commute get worse? Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

After using the term “yellow folks” to refer to Asians in an email, Manhattan Community Education Council 3 is calling for Brooklyn Community Education Council member Dr. Jackie Cody to resign. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Flushing’s (wet) Lunar New Year parade. (Jenna Gyimesi for NY City Lens)

A fire in Chinatown likely destroyed 85,000 items, some dating to the 19th century, from Museum of Chinese in America. (Annie Correal for NY Times)

The Museum of Chinese in America is fundraising as they attempt to save what they can and rebuild. (Bowery Boogie)

An attempt at a definitive guide to New York’s Chinatowns. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

You think you pay to much in rent? Check out these $1,000 a month “sleeping pods” in a basement that are being proposed in San Francisco. (Katie Canales for Business Insider)

The NYPD is finally changing how it endorses the mayor’s electric bike ban. The focus will be on “unsafe” riding instead of ticketing and confiscating the bikes of food delivery workers, as their previous focused seemed to be. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

One thing missing from the coverage of Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams’s moronic “go back to Ohio” comments was that the day prior to making them he was a guest at a banquet for the Real Estate Board of New York. It’s easier to make a villain of transplants instead of looking at the root problem of real estate developers who donate to your campaign for mayor and create the buildings that all these Ohioans and Iowans are moving living in. (Queens Crap)

20 standout Korean BBQ restaurants to try. (James Park for Eater)

Brooklyn Councilman Rafael Espinal quit City Council for a job with the Freelancer’s Union and the people working in his office found out about his new job via a tweet. There will be a special election for his seat in May, which represents Cypress Hills, Bushwick, Brownsville, Ocean Hill and East New York. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The Spotted Pig’s staff was told to seek other work, and customers have been told that last weekend would be the restaurant’s last. It seems like the restaurant couldn’t wipe clean the stain of Ken Freidman or the things he allowed to happen inside its walls. (Eater)

You’re a reader of The Briefly, so this doesn’t apply to you, but for everyone else, where to take someone to eat who is cooler than you. (Bryan Kim and Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for October 29, 2019 – The “Seven Years Since Hurricane Sandy” Edition

Italian AOC, Corey Johnson’s Master Plan is expected to pass City Council, the best ramen, dogs in Halloween costumes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Popeyes chicken sandwich returns on Sunday. An excellent pairing with early voting. (Gothamist)

Reminder: Early voting continues all week. (QNS.com)

You can go to the Village to watch the Halloween parade if you’re a masochist, but NY1 will broadcast the parade and there’s a live webcam you can fire up if you can’t “borrow” someone’s Spectrum password. Enjoy costume spotting without braving the rain, people, or the subway ride home. (Curbed)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson’s “Streets Master Plan” is expected to pass City Council this week, which would add 250 miles of protected bike lanes and 150 dedicated bus lanes to the city. (6sqft)

The mayor supports the plan, but only as long as he doesn’t have to preside over it. The first year of the plan would be 2021, the first year the city would be free from de Blasio’s mayorship. (Gothamist)

Data continues to show traffic on 13th St has not gotten any worse than it was before the 14th St busway. (Streetsblog)

Here’s how NYC is preparing for the next Hurricane Sandy. (Curbed)

Industry City’s 6.6-million-square-foot expansion plan and renderings have been revealed. (New York YIMBY)

Photos: Check out all the good pups in the Fort Greene dog costume contest. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Domestic violence is the leading causing of homelessness in the city. 41% of people entering shelters from July 2017 through July 2018 did so following a domestic violence incident. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

One in ten of the city’s 1.1 million students is homeless, according to the New York State Technical and Education Assistance Center for Homeless Students. (Patch)

Photos: “What’s the big deal about Wegmans?  Am I missing something?” was a text I got from a friend on Monday morning. I honestly couldn’t tell you but it’s hard to argue with the droves of people who showed up in the rain. (Gothamist)

The mayor made a big deal about having “the talk” with his son when it comes to dealing with the police during his failed presidential campaign, but what he didn’t talk about was the more than half a dozen times he had the NYPD drive his son to and from Yale or pick him up at Penn Station when he decided to take the train. The mayor denies this. (Patch)

Photos: The 16th annual Bike Kill, a gathering of “mutant bicycles,” originated by the Black Label Bicycle Club. (Gothamist)

8 of New York City’s spookiest abandoned sites. (6sqft)

There is mounting support for a ban of non-essential helicopter flights around the city, ending the steady stream of sightseeing rides around lower Manhattan and Uber’s new “taxi” service to JFK. (Brooklyn Paper)

Photos: More from Great PUPkin Halloween Parade in Fort Greene Park. (Gothamist)

Winter is usually the quiet time of year to rent in the city, but there are indications that this year will be tougher than usual. (StreetEasy)

A plan to regulate hotels south of Union Square is being met with mixed reactions. According to City Councilmember Carlina Rivera, the plan would protect neighborhoods against outsized commercial developments like the Moxy Hotel on East 11th St, but it’s met with skepticism that it would instead encourage the development of office buildings. (Curbed)

Why hip hop began in the Bronx. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Add a tugboat to the things that need to be removed from the Gowanus Canal. The boat started taking on water during Sunday’s rain, eventually becoming almost entirely submerged. (Curbed)

Meet Roger the Sloth, the newest resident at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Video: Does this arrest on the subway go too far? Guns were drawn amid a crowded car to arrest a man for fare evasion. (HuffPost)

The 7th annual Barnacle Parade will be held today (Tuesday) from 4-9 pm in Red Hook on Van Brunt St celebrating the neighborhood’s resiliency in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The City Council voted to suspend Andy King for 30 days and fine him $15,000 after a report substantiated a whole list of claims against the member from the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Italian AOC is the best meme of the week. (Twitter)

It’s almost a cliche to hear a company say “unionizing won’t solve the workers’ concerns,” but here we are and of all companies to put that message forward, it’s Housing Works. (NY Times)

Would you be surprised to hear that Mayor Bill de Blasio’s dead presidential run was paid for by donors with city interests? (Politico)

25 of the best ramen bowls in the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for October 16, 2019 – The “Cuomo Uses the N-Word on the Radio” Edition

Traffic on the Kosciuszko is worse after the new bridge, a body was discovered under a manhole, Michelin’s NYC Bib Gourmand picks are out and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you’ve been enjoying the weather for the last week, tough shit, you’re in for a rude awakening later today. (Gothamist)

The results of the new Kosciuszko Bridge, which cost $873 million to build, are in. Traffic SLOWER headed towards Queens. Almost a billion dollars and it’s made traffic worse. Good job all around. (Greenpointers)

There is a new breed of bro in the city. Are you ready for the sushi bro? (Eater)

Here’s a new entry into the NYC nightmare books: A decomposing body was found under a manhole on W 58th and Broadway. There is no indication of how it happened and no cause of death has been determined yet. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo, while fully awake and during a radio interview, casually used the N-word while discussing slurs used against Italians. (@yashar)

The governor dropped the N-word just after talking about the importance of apologizing after making offensive comments. (Gothamist)

Now that the 14th St busway has been a success, everyone is looking around the city for the next street for a car traffic ban. Is Fordham Road in the Bronx next? (Welcome2TheBronx)

The Times takes a look at Yorkville, the Upper East Side neighborhood that was connected to the rest of the city with the second avenue subway. (NY Times)

If you’ve never been to Red Hook, you’ve never seen the abandoned trolley behind the Fairway. Even if you’ve seen it, maybe you don’t know the history behind it. (Untapped Cities)

A tour of Astoria’s best Greek tavernas and sweets. (Brooklyn Based)

The plans for the city’s Rikers-replacing neighborhood jails have shrunk. Thanks to a new estimate that there will only be 3,300 people incarcerated in NYC by 2026 (the year Rikers will close), all four replacements have significantly shrunk in size. (Curbed)

The mystique surrounding some doodles by artist Yoshitomo Nara in Niagra bar on Avenue A is strong. This week some people this week estimated they could be worth upwards of $5 million and simply taking a photo of them got one of Gothamist’s writers booted from the bar. (Gothamist)

State Sen. Brian Benjamin is taking a cue from Kamala Harris’s playbook and proposed a bill that gives tax relief to New Yorkers paying more than 30% of their income on rent, as long as their income was under $125k/year. (6sqft)

Here are Michelin’s NYC Bib Gourmand picks for 2020, restaurants with high-quality meals for under $40. (Gothamist)

There’ll be a Wu-Tang Clan art pop-up on October 24 and 25. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The New York Immigrant Freedom Fund pays immigration bonds for community members who are unable to afford it and have raised over $2 million to bond out 300 people in the New York area. (Gothamist)

There are NYPD oversight measures on the ballot this year, but how significant are they? (Gotham Gazette)

The best Indian restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)