The Briefly for September 25, 2019 – The “Worst Possible Possible Candidate for Mayor” Edition

The Strand sues the city, treating carbon emissions like money, the LinkNYC Teletubbies, the East Side Protection plan approved, vegan restaurants, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The Strand will sue the city in federal court to try to remove the landmark status of its building with the idea that the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s decision is an unconstitutional taking of private property. (Gothamist)

Tomokazu Matsuyama’s mural on the Bowery Wall is one of the most complex murals I can recall for the wall and took two weeks for the artist and 10 assistants working 12 hour days to complete. (Downtown Express)

Donald Trump Jr has decided not to run for mayor of NYC, despite past comments and wanting to. (Jezebel)

Whoever dressed up a bunch of LinkNYC kiosks like Teletubbies, you are a hero. (Gothamist)

The real estate and development industries don’t have a unifying board or mouthpiece that speaks for them, so when it comes to huge issues like climate change and carbon emissions everyone’s voice is singular. Where does the industry that creates 75% of NYC’s 52 metric tons of emissions stand? (The Real Deal)

62-year-old MD Abul Bashar died from injuries sustained on September 18 from being hit by a Lomangino Brothers dump truck, making him the 23rd cyclist to be killed in 2019 by a vehicle on NYC streets. 2018’s number was 10. (Streetsblog)

The East Side flood protection plan was approved by the City Planning Commission, despite outcry from the public that the city’s timeline seems unrealistic. (Curbed)

The Midtown Dean & DeLuca is now closed, leaving only the flagship in Soho open. (NY Times)

3 million public parking spaces, or 12 Central Parks, worth of space being used as storage for private property. Maybe it could be put to better use? (Gothamist)

There are still many unanswered questions about the man who jumped in front of a 4 train holding his daughter on Monday morning. The latest reports say that the five-year-old daughter is physically unharmed while Fernando Balbuena-Flores was pronounced dead by the FDNY. (Gothamist)

The NYPD will enact multiple suggestions in an attempt to end suicides on the force, which includes 9 active and 2 retired members in 2019. The Department of Investigations suggested adding a wellness outreach unit with a psychologist, social worker, and police officer for every 1,000 officers, a training program to adjust to civilian life, and more. (amNY)

Swedish coffee chain Fika abruptly closed all seven of its NYC stores following a recent bankruptcy filing. (Eater)

Think you’ve got what it takes to become “Miss Subways?” Applications are being accepted through the 29th with the pageant taking place on October 3. (amNY

The city’s law that bans pre-employment drug tests for marijuana goes into effect in May 2020 and in the process will change HR policies nationwide. (amNY)

The City Council is poised to change control over Hart Island from the Department of Corrections to the Department of Parks and Recreation with a new package of bills. (Politico)

Chipotle employees in 20 locations all over the city went on strike on Tuesday over complaints of labor violations. Would you like illegal scheduling and denying extra pay with your burrito bowl? (Splinter)

The City Council will look at a bill that would treat our carbon emissions like our finances, taking inspiration from a model created by Oslo, Norway. (HuffPost)

In New York, it is a misdemeanor to claim to be able to use “occult powers, to answer questions or give advice on personal matters or to exorcise, influence or affect evil spirits or curses,” but it’s legal to do so “for entertainment purposes only.” Three spiritual advisors on the Upper West Side crossed over that line and owe their victims $60,000. (NY Times)

Amid a sexual harassment inquiry, Plácido Domingo left the Met Opera. (NY Times)

Williamsburg’s N 6th St is now the “hottest street” in Brooklyn when it comes to retail. (Bedford + Bowery)

19 rock-solid vegan restaurants in the city. (Eater)

The Briefly for March 12, 2019 – The “Half a Chrysler Building of Cocaine” Edition

The MTA claims the subways are moving faster, the rise of vegan diners, James Dolan will ensure no one ever sees the Knicks, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The previous owners of the Chrysler Building lost $650 million in the $150 million sale of the building. Not a bad deal for 1.2 million square feet. (HuffPost)

Rent in Rego Park and Jackson Heights are leading the way in Queens rent increases according to a February 2019 Rental Market Report. (QNS)

If Knicks owner and awful songwriter James Dolan banned everyone who heckled him to sell the team, there would be no one left in MSG. (Gothamist)

The TWA Hotel at JFK will also include artifact and memorabilia exhibitions. A curator for the New York Historical Society is working on the project. (6sqft)

Jake’s Dilemma, an Upper West Side bar, is being review bombed on Yelp for refusing service to someone in a MAGA hat. The MAGA adorned Dion Cini was banned from Disneyland and Disney World after continually unfurling Trump 2020 banners on rides, so you know he’s a real winner. (Eater)

Jake’s Dilemma suspended the hero bartender, despite owner Mitch Banchik admitting the MAGA man was being obnoxious and was given warnings before being asked to leave. (BrooklynVegan)

Federal agencies seized $77 million of cocaine at a port near the city in the largest bust in 25 years. One more bust of that size and they could have bought the Chrysler Building! (Gothamist)

The diner may be on the decline, but there are new standouts looking to evolve the diner concept with vegan alternatives. (Grubstreet)

Meet the women who founded New York City’s modern and contemporary art museums. (6sqft)

The city’s Department of Education is visiting homeless shelters to help families apply for free pre-kindergarten for all 4-year-olds. Families have until March 15 to apply. (Gothamist)

Does a Spider-Man superfan know more about NYC than a local? Let’s skip the entire “What qualifies someone to be a local?” conversation. That’s never helpful. (Gizmodo)

Meet Fauzia Abdur-Rahman, the jerk chicken queen of the Bronx. (Munchies)

Why do New Yorkers walk so fast? The proper answer is that we don’t. You walk too slow. (Gothamist)

The GVSHP submitted a request to landmark the interior of the West Village’s historic White Horse Tavern after the building was purchased by a questionable consortium of developers. (Curbed)

The woman who sprayed multiple people with pepper spray on Friday reportedly claimed she hated white people before spraying them. Tasha Herd was charged with multiple hate-crime felonies and misdemeanors in connection to the attacks. (NY Times)

The city’s school are going meatless on Mondays for the 2019-2020 school year. It’s healthier for students and better for the environment. (amNY)

Aly and Charlie Weisman went out in search of the city’s best bagel and lox. (Food Insider)

The Brooklyn Diocese is demanding an apology from Pete Davidson after comparing the Catholic Church to R. Kelly. Those in glass cathedrals shouldn’t throw stones. (Gothamist)

The MTA says trains are moving faster at 50 stations across the city. Have you noticed the difference? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The smallest pedestrian bridge in Central Park. (Ephemeral New York)

The joys of getting lost. (Atlas Obscura)

The global Time Out Index has revealed that NYC is the best city in the world. Duh. (Time Out)

There have been 182 cases of measles in the city, almost exclusively within the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. (NY Times)

Where to get brunch if you hate brunch. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for February 21, 2019 – The “No One Thinks de Blasio Should Run for President” Edition

A look at the Public Advocate debate, low-level marijuana cases are down 98% in Brooklyn, the city lied to get more FEMA funding, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

It looks like a museum, but it’s a button store named for a Gertrude Stein poem. (Atlas Obscura)

The city subpoenaed 20,000 apartment listings from Airbnb as a response to what Mayor de Blasio says is Airbnb’s unwillingness to cooperate with the city to crackdown on illegal hotels. (The Real Deal)

The 11 best things to do on Roosevelt Island, but maybe you want to wait for spring first. (6sqft)

There is a special election for the city’s Public Advocate on Tuesday. As a reader of The Briefly you are among some of the most informed voters in the city. Here’s what you need to know about the election. (Gothamist)

Watch the second Public Advocate debate in full. (NY1)

There is one thing that all the Public Advocate candidates from last night’s debate agree on: Bill de Blasio should not run for president. (Politico)

StreetsPAC has endorsed Melissa Mark-Viverito for Public Advocate. (Streetsblog)

The 12 best restaurants in Rego Park and Forest Hills. (Grub Street)

Five takeaways from the Public Advocate debate. (Patch)

New York City will never become a cashless society if Councilman Ritchie Torres’s bill passes. (NY Times)

Low level marijuana cases are down 98% in Brooklyn. At a cost of $2,000 per arrest, it’s quite a bit of savings. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Can you run a business out of your apartment? (Bushwick Daily)

If you want to party like the kids on “Made in Staten Island,” here’s your guide. If you want to avoid partying like the kids on “Made in Staten Island,” here’s your guide of places to avoid. (amNY)

13 bars and restaurants for history lovers across the United States, including Manhattan’s Fraunces Tavern. (Atlas Obscura)

The gentrification of Bed Stuy is threatening the existence of the city’s last black-owned LGBTQ club. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Have you ever been through a breakup so bad that it makes you swear off dating altogether? The End Corporate Welfare Act is the City Council’s version of that with luring giant corporations to the city with subsidies. (Patch)

Take a look at Spike Lee’s New York City. (StreetEasy)

How can the MTA fix the R train? Congressman Max Rose’s solution is Solomon-esque. (amNY)

Murder in the city is up by 55% this year compared to last. Some police officers are blaming the end of stop and frisk. (NY Post)

The city lied to FEMA to get more Hurricane Sandy relief funding and will pay the federal government back more than $5.3 million as part of a tentative settlement. (NY Times)

East Harlem residents are feeling pissed about this closed public bathroom. So are the recipients of the more than 1,500 public urination summonses in the area. (Patch)

Winter is harsh on the city, but it causes chaos, explosions, fires, leaks, and uncertainty underground, where electric, steam, water, and gas lines flow. Climate change is making it worse. (NY Times)

Bookmark this list for the next extremely cold day. 19 stellar soups. (Eater)

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