The Briefly for June 11, 2019 – The “The Pizza Wars of New York Are Getting Saucy” Edition

14th St will become a busway in July, the mayor’s nemesis is a 16-year-old teen, New Yorkers support ending the measles religious exemption, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Two Bridges towers are at the center of a legal battle, centered around the developers’ attempts to work around the city council and the land use review procedures. (Curbed)

Respect to whoever was able to cover an entire Q train with graffiti extremely quickly without being caught. (@JMartinezNYC)

Welcome to Soho, or as the Times puts it, “CBD stores and face-mask pushers are going to destroy us all.” (NY Times)

The Brooklyn Pizza War of 2019 has only just begun. L&B Spumoni Gardens is opening up a DUMBO outpost mere steps from Grimaldi’s and Juliana’s. May the best slice win. (Eater)

It appears that Robert De Niro is on the verge of building a movie studio in Astoria. (QNS)

A correction from yesterday (thanks Harry!), the apartment building planned for the former Hell’s Angels clubhouse will be 22 apartments, not 22 stories. (Curbed)

Tiffani Torres is 16, a twice-caller on “Ask the Mayor” on WNYC, an activist with Teens Take Charge, and a thorn in the mayor’s side. She’s correctly criticized the mayor for his DOA presidential run distracting him from city business and has been vocal about the systemic issues facing the city’s schools. Is it too late to elect her mayor? She sat down for an interview with the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York was a different place in the late 70s. (Bowery Boogie)

Does Times Square need a 24-hour, multi-story “immersive” Krispy Kreme with a theater and, no I’m not kidding, a goddamn “glaze waterfall?” Of course it does. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s Pride Parade took over Park Slope last weekend with heavy splashes of color, celebration, politicians, and remembrance of the Stonewall Riots half a century ago. (Brooklyn Paper)

Layleen Polanco, a 27-year old transgender woman, was found dead at Rikers Island on Friday. Polanco was a member of the House of Xtravaganza (get yourself up to speed on Ball Culture) and was arrested in April for assault and possession of a controlled substance. (Patch)

The city council scheduled a hearing to look into accusations against Grubhub (who owns Seamless), as well as Uber Eats, Doordash and the like, from restaurants accusing the company of charging fees for customer calls that never resulted in orders. (Eater)

10 of the best running spots in New York City, even if I think saying the High Line is a great place to run is like saying the Brooklyn Bridge is a great place to bike. (6sqft)

A helicopter crashed into AXA Equitable Center in Midtown, killing the pilot. Have you noticed how many helicopters are constantly flying around Manhattan? Manhattan has three public heliports and this was the second crash in less than a month, but that doesn’t seem to slow down the $800 trips to the Hamptons or the new service to take people to JFK Airport. (NY Times)

“Oh, you’re a girl, I thought you were a guy,” is an auspicious way to start a job somewhere. A chef is suing Hudson Yards Spanish food hall Mercado Little Spain, claiming she was fired for being a woman. (Eater)

With the Stop Violence in the Sex Trades Act, New York has a path to become the first state to decriminalize sex work, even in the face of criticism from the governor, the mayor, and Corey Johnson. (Patch)

The NYPD are arresting turnstile jumpers. The officers have wide latitude to decide who they arrest and who they ticket, so it should become obvious very quickly that people of color will be arrested at a higher rate. In 2019 people of color represent 87% of people arrested for farebeating. exact numbers aren’t known because the NYPD is refusing to comply with a court order demanding them to disclose these numbers. (Gothamist)

The conversation about rent control has gotten so muddy and opaque it’s hard to know if this article which says that mom-and-pop landlords may decide to sell their buildings if rent reform passes, is steeped in the truth or has roots in one of the many astroturfing campaigns from larger landlords and developers. (amNY)

New Yorkers overwhelmingly support the end of religious exemptions for the measles vaccine. Overwhelming is 85%, which includes more than 80% support from the Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant populations polled. There’s a bill in the state’ legislature as you read this, but there is only a week left in the legislative session until summer recess. (Patch)

St. James Place in Bed Stuy is now Christopher “Notorious B.I.G.” Wallace Way. (amNY)

Congrats to Gothamist on their site redesign. (Gothamist)

The perfect time for a sci-fi radio show is after midnight when everything is quiet and your imagination is ripe for exploration of its dark recesses. The “Hour of the Wolf” has aired between 1am – 3am on Thursday mornings since 1972. Helmed by Jim Freund, the show has had nearly every writer of importance on the show, the first U.S. broadcast of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, and whose website was originally a collaboration with Tim Berners-Lee, the literal father of the world wide web. A living piece of broadcasting history on Atlantic Avenue. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 14th St busway will arrive on July 1, drastically changing traffic and (hopefully_ speeding up the buses. (amNY)

32 great places to eat something kind of healthy for dinner. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for June 4, 2019 – The “If 311 Doesn’t Work, Try A Lawsuit” Edition

the G train lentil soup experiment, sex work is at the center of the Queens DA race, Gov Ball organizers apologize, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Missed this yesterday, but the advice for the subway after 10pm this week is “maybe not.” Service changes will be disrupting nearly every line somewhere. (6sqft)

The organizers of Governors Ball are attempting to stave off the Fyre Festival comparisons with a “transparent” backstory to what the hell happened with Sunday’s cancelations that led to people being stuck on Randall’s Island. (BrooklynVegan)

RIP “Service Changes.” Hello “Train Rerouted,” “Express to Local,” and “Multiple Impacts.” (Gothamist)

The city is already more annoying than last year, and the 311 noise complaints are proof, but here’s an interesting alternative. After complaints went nowhere, Mike Edison threatened to sue in small claims court, and it’s been working. (NY Times)

The Newtown Creek nature walk, which is really quite pleasant but has an air of being unfinished, is being expanded by the Department of Environmental Protection and connected to the eastern side of Whale Creek. (Curbed)

Inside Cowboy Technical Services, a recording studio celebrating twenty years in the city. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Hundreds of students staged an hourslong sit-in at LaGuardia High School to protest a perceived dilution of LaGuardia’s arts focus in favor of stricter academic requirements. (NY Times)

Sex work is shaping this year’s Queens DA election, with candidates trying to thread the needle of decriminalizing sex work while also eradicating the forced sex work and trafficking industry. (amNY)

If you’re wandering in Central Park looking for something new, try to find the somewhat hidden sundial that’s just inside Inventor’s Gate at East 72nd Street. When you’re there, snag a photo and tag @TheBrieflyNYC on Instagram (Ephemeral New York)

An ice cream parlor for dogs? Yes, it’s in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

OMNY is on its way into the hearts of New Yorkers. The first full weekend of its rollout saw 6,100 taps, which isn’t bad for only being available at 16 stations and on Staten Island buses. (amNY)

The World Trade Center is still unfinished. The Port Authority and Lower Manhattan Development Corporation reached a deal to move forward with a request for proposals for 5 World Trade Center, the last piece of land. With 18 years on, construction may never be finished. (Curbed)

Staten Island’s 11 oldest buildings. (Untapped Cities)

It’s been a year since the mayor called for changes to the city’s specialized high school admissions exams. What’s changed? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Raines sandwich, “an old desiccated ruin of dust-laden bread and mummified ham or cheese,” has its roots in New York’s very odd pre-prohibition drinking laws. (Atlas Obscura)

NYC’s poverty rate is down, but nearly one in five New Yorkers are still technically poor. (Patch)

Poor Jake Dobkin, whose experience with Revel, the city’s newest alternative transportation kid on the block which offers mopeds by the minute, was not ideal. Hey Jake, I’ve been waiting for my account to be approved since Saturday, so you should feel lucky you were even able to sign up! (Gothamist)

Thomas Keller and his restaurants Per Se and the French Laundry go to trial today for a pregnancy discrimination lawsuit, where they are being sued for $5 million for allegedly pushing out a staffer after she became pregnant. (Eater)

Here’s what you need to know about the Puerto Rican Day Parade this Sunday. (Curbed)

The NYC holy grail: 1-bedrooms under $1,500. (StreetEasy)

Especially considering that one-bedroom rents are at an all-time high of $2,980/month. (Curbed)

The Williamsburg “Link” buses meant to divert people from the L train to alternatives were cut from the city’s bus lineup due to a lack of use. In their place will the new B91 and B92 routes. (Gothamist)

At the last moment, the mayor is showing his support for rent control laws and marijuana legalization on a state-wide level. The legislative session ends on June 19, and at the moment neither proposal is a sure thing. (amNY)

Inside the great G train lentil soup experiment. (Gothamist)

Lyme Disease rates are down in the city for the first time in five years. Everyone wear your knee-length socks all summer! (Patch)

The 7 train tracks continue to fall apart, dropping debris on the streets below. This week it was Roosevelt Ave near 53rd St that received a free souvenir from the MTA. A reminder that the MTA feels that netting isn’t necessary to protect people from its literally crumbling infrastructure. (Jackson Heights Post)

14 essential BBQ restaurants. (Eater)

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The Briefly for April 18, 2019 – The “Tough Talk From A Mayor Who Can’t Back It Up” Edition

A five-alarm fire in Marine Park, poking more holes in congestion pricing, the view from Brooklyn’s tallest tower, universal rent control and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The view from the top of Brooklyn’s tallest tower is magnificent, but it’ll only be the tallest tower for a short period of time. (Curbed)

The latest hole poked in the city’s congestion pricing condom is for Bronx residents, who will not have to pay to cross the Henry Hudson Bridge. (Streets Blog)

Mayor de Blasio touts the NYC Ferry system for addressing some of New York’s “historic inequities,” despite having literally zero evidence to back up his claim. (amNY)

The mayor claims the reason for his crackdown on electric bikes has been safety, but he’s either willfully lying or he’s pathetically uninformed. Neither option is great. There were 45,775 motor vehicle collisions that resulted in injuries, 31 of those involving electric bikes and 23 of those were injuries to the rider of the bike. Zero pedestrians were killed by bikes, electric or otherwise. (Streetsblog)

The NYPD only cost the city $230 million in settlements last year. $25.4 million of that was a settlement in a federal class-action lawsuit related to the NYPD’s illegal arrest quotas, which the NYPD denies is still happening, while it is still very much happening. (Gothamist)

The mayor declared Tuesday “Jin Park Day” in honor of Harvard student Jin Park, the first undocumented Rhodes scholar in history who has been a longtime NYC resident. (Huff Post)

The 16 best French restaurants in New York. (Grub Street)

The $3 billion Amazon tax subsidy is dead. Are any lawmakers daring enough to go after the film tax credit, which has given out $6.5 billion in subsidies in the last fifteen years? (Gothamist)

Take a video tour of Brooklyn… from 1949. (js4653)

How to find temporary student housing in the city. (StreetEasy)

Long Island City’s Noguchi Museum is making a 6,000 square foot expansion and opening Noguchi’s original studio building. The expansion is expected to be finished by 2021. (Curbed)

10 iconic Bushwick landmarks. None of them involve unicycles, Four Loko can structures, mustache wax, or eight people living in a two bedroom apartment. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With the Democrats in firm control of New York, tenants are seeing more protections, which may include “universal rent control.” (NY Times)

Rent control is good for cities according to a new study. The city’s welfare went up when rent control increased. The reduction of the housing supply was outweighed by the positive effect of not worrying about losing your home. (Gothamist)

A closer look at how Oregon implemented Universal Rent Control to stop a crisis of displacement and gentrification. (Curbed)

Surprise the Harry Potter fan in your life with reservations to The Wizard Brunch when it hits NYC, which recreates an experience that is close but not to an infringing level, of eating at Hogwarts. (Time Out)

Avoid spicy tuna rolls and all raw tuna for a while. The CDC and FDA flagged it as part of a recall of Salmonella-tainted tuna coming from a company in Louisiana. New York was one of 13 states affected. Go for vegetarian options. (Gothamist)

Where to get rid of your unwanted shit when doing your spring cleaning. (6sqft)

Continuing his Justice 2020 push to move away from an over-reliance of jailing people, Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez announced a softer parole policy for Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The City’s Board of Health mandatory measles vaccination was upheld in a unanimous Health Department vote. No one has been fined $1,000, but over 500 children have been vaccinated in the last week. (Gothamist)

Street vendors will take over empty subway storefronts in Corona, thanks to a partnership with the MTA announced State Senator Jessica Ramos. (Curbed)

Where to get a Passover meal in the city. (Patch)

A Brooklyn Supreme Court judge temporarily blocked a plan to build two 16-story rental buildings, the construction of the buildings is opposed by activist groups and the Brooklyn Botanical Garden. (Gothamist)

We are one step closer to a five-cent fee for a paper bags once the plastic bag ban is enacted. (amNY)

It took about four hours, but nearly 200 firefighters put out a five-alarm fire in Marine Park. (Bklyner)

The M14 needs to step it up before the L Project ruins your trip to Williamsburg for brunch according to Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer. Maybe she didn’t say the brunch part. (amNY)

A new law will prevent ICE from making arrests inside courthouses without judicial warrants. (TIme)

Happy Easter this Sunday, that’s also the day the city’s subways and buses will rise. (amNY)

A man was arrested for trying to carry two gas cans, two bottles of lighter fluid, and two butane lighters into St. Patricks Cathedral. He claims he was just cutting through the Cathedral to Madison Ave. Dude, come on. (NY Times)

Rents in Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens have hit an all-time high. Prices dropped in Williamsburg and Greenpoint, but now that Cuomo’s L Project has taken over for the L Shutdown, kiss that trend goodbye. Where is Jimmy McMillan when we need him? (StreetEasy)

Where to eat regionally inspired Mexican food in the city. (Eater)

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