The Briefly for December 4, 2019 – The “Another Reason Not to Eat Sushi From Walgreens” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Mayor de Blasio says a new stupid thing, the most popular dog names in the city, a french fry shortage is on the horizon, the Rock Center tree, and more.

The city won’t reveal its master plan for the Sunnyside Yards at a traditional town hall meeting, instead favoring a digital town hall, requiring participants to register in advance. Does the EDC expect a massive turnout and couldn’t find an appropriate space or are they trying to suppress opposition to their plan? (Michael Dorgan and Christian Murray for LIC Post)

If you’re the Governors Ball-going type, tickets are available for presale and they’re dropping hints about the lineup on Instagram. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

There’s a recall of ready-to-eat sushi, salads, and spring rolls from Trader Joe’s and Walgreens due to a contamination of Listeria. Trader Joe’s has reported no illnesses and if you have contaminated food you can bring it back for a refund. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Is Hurricane Dorian going to cause a french fry shortage? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A cargo delivery bike pilot program will be announced today with Amazon, DHL, and Whole Foods among its participants. The bikes look to be part truck and part bike, but will take up a much smaller footprint in regards to carbon and parking. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

More info on the cargo bikes: They’ll be big, but also pedal assisted, allowed in commercial loading spaces, and will be concentrated from 60th to the Battery. (Winnie Hu and Matthew Hang for NY Times)

The process to make Rikers Island a public space kicked off this week to make way for the jail’s closing in 2026. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall is getting a $550 million remodel. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

Has Mayor de Blasio’s control over the city’s schools been effective? The state Assembly will hold a hearing on the 16th. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s coming to Off-Broadway this December. (Matt Windman for amNewYork)

Vending machines like the CVS machines in Union Square and Chambers St station is both a new and nearly 120 year old idea. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A holiday tipping guide: How much to tip your doorman, super, porter, and more. (Brick Underground)

New York spends the most per student than any other state in the country and has the 13th lowest graduation rate. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Quickly: What’s the different between hemp and marijuana? The Brooklyn District Attorney’s office doesn’t know either. Earlier this year they boasted about stopping 106 pounds of marijuana from hitting the streets, but it was hemp, and they arrested Oren Levy from Green Angel CBD under the same assumption. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’ll be easier to prove tenant harassment from landlords thanks to new bills signed into law by Governor Cuomo. The laws expand the definition of harassment, remove the requirement that tenants prove they’ve been physically hurt by their landlords, and increases punishment for landlords who try to force out rent-regulated tenants. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 Rockefeller enter Christmas tree. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

New Yorkers pride themselves on knowing the best alternatives. The best delis that aren’t Katz, the best pizza in DUMBO that isn’t from Grimaldi’s, the best food that isn’t outside your neighborhood, etc. Here are 20 Christmas trees that aren’t in Rockefeller Center. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A new public light installation at Brookfield Place called Light Up Luminaries creates a canopy of multi-colored, lit up cubes suspended from the ceiling with a “show” every hour. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

Lord & Taylor is returning to the city for two weeks in December in the form of a 2,400 square foot pop-up shop in Soho, a far cry from their 676,000 square foot Fifth Avenue flagship location that was shuttered at the beginning of the year. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

The NYPD has been shooting surveillance films of “individuals and enemies of the state” for decades and thanks to the Handschu agreement, over a hundred hours of digitized footage from the 1960s through the 1980s is available through the Department of Records & Information Services. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The laws passed on Tuesday are only the start of what advocates hope will be a fruitful 2020 session when it comes to rent reforms. Multiple bills addressing evictions, tenant protections and housing stability are still in-process in Albany. (Mark Hallum for amNewyork)

The mayor is venturing towards full-on idiot mode with every passing day. When asked if the NYPD should be allowed to publicly display Thin Blue Line flags on NYPD property, the mayor said “There’s a lot of Photoshop in this world, so we’ll see.” The Thin Blue Line flag has been adopted by neo-Nazis and white supremacists in response to the Black Lives Matter movement. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

40 inexpensive dining destinations. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New Yorkers speak 637 languages, and the Endangered Language Alliance has mapped them all. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Let’s start with the obvious, we did not arrest Wolverine.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

How much did your school’s PTA bring in last year? (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

The most popular dog names in the city and Max and Bella. You’ve gotta step up your dog naming game. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden is offering free admission Tuesday to Friday, noon to 4:30pm. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

At least five Rikers Island correction officers have been suspended as investigators examine their failure to stop an 18-year-old detainee’s suicide attempt. (Ed Shanahan and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

Where to go when you’ve eaten everywhere in Williamsburg. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 16, 2019 – The “Everyone is Moving Slower Than We Used To” Edition

This weekend’s subway changes, a look at “environmental review,” real estate brokers are finding ways around rent reforms, de Blasio eats a corn dog and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend’s subways are seriously taking a break from normal service with disruptions on the 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, D, F, M, N, and the Staten Island Railway. (Subway Weekender)

What is “Environmental Review” and why NIMBY lawsuits cite it as a reason to kill projects like the Central Park West bike lane or 14 St busway. (Streetsblog)

A Bronx man will serve a three-to-nine-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to second-degree manslaughter after fleeing the scene of a drunken car crash that killed Jose Cardoso. (Brooklyn Paper)

In the last 10 years, the average speed of a taxi below 60th St has gone from 9mph to 7mph, traffic speeds in midtown are down to 4.9 mph, subway and bus ridership declined, and it’s faster to get anywhere in midtown on a bike. Wherever we’re all going, we’re all getting there slower than ever, unless we’re on a bike. (Gothamist)

There will not be any charges against the driver who killed Aurilla Lawrence with a truck in a hit-and-run crash on February 28. It appears that if a driver claims they didn’t know they hit anyone, the NYPD won’t bring charges. (Streetsblog)

I believe we can all agree gentrification is inevitable, with both positive and negative outcomes,” says a man who is developing “co-living” real estate (read: dorm living for adults) in Bushwick who refuses to call himself a real estate developer. (NY Times)

Only for the brave: You can canoe the Gowanus Canal. (Brooklyn Based)

A guide to the city’s rental-finding websites. (Curbed)

Tribeca, NoLita, and Soho have remained the most expensive neighborhoods to live in for years, but Cobble Hill, Red Hook, and Grammercy Park are climbing that list quickly. (StreetEasy)

Everyone loves a list of hot spots unless it means a literal list of America’s hot spots where temperatures are rising dangerously fast and are past the point of “catastrophic effects.” (Patch)

Revel has added classes in August and September for people who feel trepidation about jumping on an electric moped for the first time. (Streetsblog)

Lobster rolls can be pretty expensive at times, but at $100, the roll at BK Lobster is “infused” with 24K gold. Thirsty for more gold? You can wash it down with wine with 23K gold flakes. (Eater)

Manero’s opens this weekend, the only slice shop on Mulberry St in Little Italy. If the name is familiar, it’s because it’s named for Tony Manero, John Travolta’s character in Saturday Night Fever and even features a double-decker slice in honor of the movie’s opening scene. (Gothamist)

State Attorney General Letitia James’s office has the Sackler Family, the seeming creators of America’s opioid crisis and founders and owners of Perdue Pharma, in its sights. The AG is investigating if the owners hid billions of dollars in an effort to hide profits. (NY Times)

There’s a connection between the rise of Uber and the popularity of late-night and overnight badminton. (Gothamist)

37 chefs give their neighborhood gems. (Grub Street)

Before the Vanderbilts were the Vanderbilts, there was Cornelius Vanderbilt, the man who built the family’s fortunes. In 1794 he was born 209 Port Richmond Ave. You won’t find a monument to the man on that spot, you’ll find No. 1 Chinese Takeout. (Untapped Cities)

Where to eat after going for a run in Williamsburg, but also after you’ve had a shower and changed your clothes. (The Infatuation)

If you want to watch the mayor eat a corn dog, there is a video of his iconic corn dog-eating moment at the Iowa State Fair that is as cringe as it gets. (@marcusdipaola)

There’s a place in this world for masochism, there really is,” was the mayor’s answer on The Daily Show for if he’s just a sucker for punishment by being the city’s mayor and a presidential candidate. (Gothamist)

An Upper East Side plastic surgeon was arrested in Westchester this week when police found a car full of loaded assault rifles and ballistic armor in the course of responding to a domestic incident. (Gothamist)

Continuing the summer of hate, hundreds of anti-semitic flyers were scattered around the Halsey stop on the L on Wednesday. (QNS)

Say hello to a $10 cup of coffee that might be worth it. (Grub Street)

A list of how companies connected to Stephen Ross have attempted to distance themselves from the man who raised $12 million for President Trump during a single meal last Friday. (6sqft)

Real estate brokers are already finding loopholes around some of the state’s new rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

The city removed a round if applications from the middle and high school admissions process this week. This change doesn’t touch the mayor’s promise to get rid of the SHSAT. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Are you one of the people among the city’s 82,473 DNA profiles in its genetic database? (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo is looking to expand consequences for mass shooters that are motivated by hate. His proposal would classify killings on the basis of race, religion, creed, or sexual orientation as terrorism and punishable by life in prison without parole. (Gothamist)

16 superior breakfast sandwiches. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 15, 2019 – The “I’ve Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway” Edition

Our absent mayor was absent during the blackout, the reinvention of the rainbow cookie, de Blasio hires his son to save his 0% campaign, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The late-night disruptions this week are minimal unless you’re on the L train in Brooklyn. Service is suspended between Lorimer and Broadway Junction. (Subway Weekender)

A gallery of how broadway shows and professional musicians handled the blackout, along with New Yorkers stepping up to direct traffic, and a video of the lights turning back on. (Huff Post)

When the power went out, the first question was “why?” The second question was where the hell is our mayor? (NY Times)

Where was the mayor? He has an average 0% support and yet he was spending the day in Iowa. (Politico)

When he was asked on the air on CNN at 9 pm, two hours after the blackout began the mayor said he was still weighing his options. (Politico)

While a portion of the city sat in darkness, it was Corey Johnson that provided public leadership on the news, Twitter, and during Sunday’s press conference. Our absentee mayor continued to be absent. (Chelsea Now)

Want to live in a city where you can save money for a rainy day? Too bad, you live in New York. (CNBC)

If you’re the person that’s been praying for consistent hot temperatures, this is the week where all your friends will give you the side-eye. Welcome to the first sweltering week of summer. (amNY)

The state legislature passed the Utility Responsibility Bill and now it waits for the governor’s signature. The bill would protect homeowners if any damage was done to their property by utility companies. (QNS)

Do you know the difference between a studio and a one-bedroom apartment? Did you know a bedroom needs to be a minimum of 80 square feet with a ceiling height minimum of eight feet? (StreetEasy)

R. Kelly has been arrested and indicted of racketeering and violating federal anti-sex trafficking laws. These are in addition to the charges he’s facing in Illinois. He faces up to 70 years in prison. (Patch)

The rainbow cookie is already perfect, but some chefs can’t leave well-enough alone. (Eater)

Whoever the monster is that stole the key to the city received by Allie Long, a member of the US Women’s National Team, understand that you have made very powerful enemies. (Gothamist)

Your landlord can threaten to let your apartment fall into disrepair, but they can’t actually do that. Learn about the warranty of habitability and what it means for your apartment. (Gothamist)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health includes “BKLYN Wild” in the Time Out Market, which broke the 100 violation point mark with a 102 score. (Patch)

Governor Cuomo, who has insisted that he is not in control of the MTA, has they need you to adopt or foster an animal. (amNY)

This Saturday is the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission to the moon and the city is celebrating multiple ways. (Gothamist)

Inside a mostly abandoned mall in Queens, Board of Elections worker are counting out the fate of the Queens District Attorney’s office. (Gothamist)

A lawsuit is challenging the legality of the “spot rezoning” that was necessary to allow the 80 Flatbush development project a reality. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Abel Cedeno says he had been bullied for being gay, took the stand in his own defense at his manslaughter trial for the murder of two of his high school classmates with a knife. (NY Times)

The city unveiled its plans to protect the east side of Manhattan from the Lower East Side to 25th St with the design of the East River Park. The East Side Coastal Resiliency Project’s walls and design would protect the area from a 16 foot level of sea rise, which is the “100-year flood + waves” level. (Curbed)

A human leg was found in a channel in the waters of Coney Island. (Brooklyn Paper)

If you think you apply for affordable housing in the city, registration is a fairly simple process. (Curbed)

The city council’s Committee on Small Business is calling on Letitia James’s office to look at the settlement agreement that allowed Grub Hub to buy Seamless in 2013 in light of the reports about Grub Hub’s business tactics. (Grub Street)

JetBlue installed Does Starbucks sell newspapers? If you answered no, you’ll soon be proven right because the company announced that they will stop selling The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and USA Today at its 8,600 locations nationwide. (NY Times)

RIP Hector Figueroa, former president of the Service Employees International Union and a key player in the fight for a $15 minimum wage. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio is polling at a 0% average in the Democrat presidential primary. Will hiring his son help his campaign? It literally couldn’t hurt it. (NY Times)

A preliminary report is suggesting that the impending MTA overhaul reduce the number of groups within the organization from 40 into six departments to centralize and simplify. The MTA’s board is expected to vote on a final version of the plan on the 24th. (amNY)

The President’s ICE enforcement action started on Saturday in the city, but early reports indicate that no one opened their doors for ICE and as a result, no one was detained. (amNY)

The race to replace José E. Serrano after he steps down as a result of a Parkinson’s disease diagnosis will be contended by Ruben Diaz Sr, an openly homophobic city councilperson, and Ritchie J Torres, the first openly gay person to hold office in the Bronx. (NY Times)

Need a late-night fix and you already had pizza for lunch? A list of late-night delivery spots that aren’t just pizza. (The Infatuation)

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