The Briefly for November 19, 2019 – The “Is The Rent Finally Too Damn High?” Edition

No one buys Bloomberg’s remorse, the opening of the new Milk Bar, Midtown BINGO, what to do if you find a coyote in Central Park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

A Midtown BINGO card, to make going to Midtown only slightly less terrible. (Gothamist)

There are signs that, to quote Jimmy McMillan, “the rent is too damn high.” The volume of apartments for rent has increased for the fourth month in a row, raising the vacancy rate across the city. (amNewYork)

Got 100 years? That’s all it’ll take the average New Yorker to save up enough money to buy a home here. (Patch)

Chef Amanda Cohen, best known for Dirt Candy on the LES, is unveiling Lekka, a new restaurant. The main event is a new veggie burger. The entire restaurant, including the name, has a South African influence. Lekka opens today. (Grub Street)

The globes on the Manhattan Bridge are coming back as part of a $75.9 million rehabilitation of the bridge. (Untapped New York)

Video: One of the three new Staten Island ferries getting launched into the water. The first is expected in the city in August. (Untapped New York)

The MTA is not known for being gentle, and their work in the 86th Street R station in Bay Ridge is no exception. Renovations have damaged the station’s historic tile work, which dates back over a century. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Martin McDonagh’s dark drama about a British executioner “Hangmen” is coming to Broadway with previews in February. “Hangmen” won the Olivier Award for best new play in 2016 in London. (NY Times)

No one is buying Michael Bloomberg’s “remorse” over stop-and-frisk. (The Root)

Holiday pop-up bar season has come for us all. (Eater)

Here come the holiday markets. (6sqft)

There’s a parent-led concerted effort going on in District 15 to integrate their middle schools and the results are encouraging. District 15 covers Park Slope, Carroll Gardens, Sunset Park, Cobble Hill and Windsor Terrace. (Gothamist)

Don’t believe the NY Post when it comes to the city’s supervised release program. Despite the headlines, the city doesn’t give everyone “gift cards, cell phones, and Mets tickets.” The supervised release program is in place to help ensure people make their court dates, and appearances have held steady at 88% when intake has increased over 50%. Pretty good track record. (Gothamist)

The Playboy Club is dead and changing into the Live Nation Theater at Cachet Hotel. Turns out not many people were interested in a $100,000 membership. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The boyhood home of Donald Trump was for sale in an auction and no one bid on it. Maybe if everyone puts in money we can buy it and throw a sledgehammer party to demolish it. (6sqft)

In tribute to the Diamond District, which sits on W 47th between Fifth and Sixth, “one of the last New York blocks left in Manhattan.” (Gothamist)

After being pressured to leave Bed-Stuy, Charlotte Taillor’s BDSM Collective and Domination School Taillor Group has settled into their home in Bushwick to host kink/BDSM workshops, self-defense classes, and private sessions, all of it legal. (Bushwick Daily)

Photos: Opening day at the new flagship Milk Bar, including the “neon hallway.” (Gothamist)

Public Advocate Jumaane Williams told the City Council’s Public Safety Committee Monday that they should pass a bill mandating the public release of NYPD body camera footage. (amNewYork)

Esquire’s list of the best new restaurants in America for 2019 is out and it includes NYC’s Rezdôra, Kawi, Oddo, Wayan, and Red Hook Tavern. (Patch)

The city is making a big push to offer services to the homeless in Outreach NYC, but the program is being met with skepticism. Yes, the outreach is improving, but the shelter system itself still has all of its own problems. (Gothamist)

Photos: The Brooklyn Botanical Garden unveiled its new Robert W. Wilson Overlook, which gives viewers a sweeping view of the Cherry Esplanade. (Curbed)

There have been more and more coyote sightings in Central Park. If you come across one, stay calm and try to avoid it. If it comes up to you, try to make yourself look bigger and make loud noises until it retreats. (Gothamist)

Pot arrests have dropped dramatically in the city, but the people arrested are still predominantly black and Hispanic, making up 90 percent of arrests last quarter. OF the 260 people arrested for possession, less than 20 were white. (Patch)

Ben Kallos, running for Manhattan Borough president, got a cease and desist from Marvel Comics for dressing up like Captain America in a recent political mailer. (Patch)

The death of 25-year-old Brooklynite Ola Salem, found in a wooded area of a Staten Island park, was ruled a homicide. (Gothamist)

The MTA is planning to renovate the 52nd Street, 61st Street, 69th, 82nd, 103st and 111th Street stations along the 7 line with renovations getting started in the second half of next year. (Jackson Heights Post)

The best burgers in the Upper West Side. (I Love The Upper West Side)

The Briefly for November 14, 2019 – The “Problem Goes Deeper Than Policing Churros” Edition

Virginity tests, the NYPD’s illegal child fingerprint database was destroyed, the food at Wegmans gets reviewed, OMNY expands, pie shops, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The punishment for killing a woman with a car? $750 and a suspended license. (Streetsblog)

“I am calling on the governor to immediately remove these additional officers from the MTA and put that money into actually improving the system. The governor cannot expect the public to pay the fare when the State is refusing to hold up its own financial responsibility.” – City Council Member Antonio Reynoso of Brooklyn (Streetsblog)

Will the 500 new police officers on buses and in subway stations prevent 33 million evaded fares a year for ten years? That figure, of course, doesn’t include any lawsuits that spawn from arrests made by those officers. That’s the monetary argument, but if the surge of officers is about fare evasion and protecting MTA workers, why are the headlines about churro ladies and teenagers selling candy? It’s about the kind of city we want to be. (Second Ave Sagas)

A look at the new Tompkins Square Playground’s equipment for kids with special needs. (EV Grieve)

The City Council voted to give themselves a $36,000 raise, but haven’t been nearly as generous with their staff, who make $47,784 annually on average. There has been conversations about unionization to improve salaries. (Politico)

A vegetarian restaurant that only serves one item, but is it any good? Yes is the answer. (Gothamist)

The city owns most of the land in the amusement area of Coney Island, but Central Amusement International (owners of Luna Park) operates the lease on the boardwalk shops. In addition to rent, they take 10% of their overall sales. In recent years they’ve been favoring their own games, shops, and food options over mom and pop shops. This is a private business deciding on the future of businesses who are on land owned by the city. Lola Star, the woman behind the boardwalk shop and roller discos across Brooklyn is stepping up and resurrecting the advocacy group Save Coney Island. (Coney Island Blog)

Every rental building in Manhattan ranked by price. (StreetEasy)

The Charging Bull isn’t moving… yet. Despite the mayor talking big in public about how it has to be moved due to Bowling Green being an unsafe place for that high number of visitors it receives, a location to move it to was never decided on. For now, the bull remains. (Gothamist)

The Coalition for Affordable Homes is introducing a proposal for a Small Home Anti-Speculation Tax that would impose a 15-20% tax on property transferred to a new owner within two years of ownership. While they may not prevent flipping houses, it would reinvest in affordable housing in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

After 24,200 calls to 911 since June using a burner cellphone, Yogit Persaud was arrested. Each time she would call, the police or FDNY or both would have to respond to the claim, regardless if they knew it was from her and it was a false report. Persaud purports the NYPD has conspired against her. She was arrested for making a false emergency report, obstructing governmental administration, and aggravated harassment. (Gothamist)

Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio, leader of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and current investigator of sexual abuse the Buffalo diocese, sexually assaulted an 11-year-old altar boy when he was a priest in New Jersey in the 70s, according to a new lawsuit. (NY Times)

Billionaire Barry Diller’s public park island off Pier 55 has a new name and it’s “Little Island.” A modest name considering the price tag ballooned from $35 million to $250 million. (Gothamist)

Junior’s Law, named for Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, is a bill that will reimburse small businesses owners the cost of a panic button, which could have saved the teenager’s life. The bill has 31 supporters in the City Council. (amNewYork)

Greenwich Village Chelsea Chamber of Commerce wants you to remember that there are still stores that are open left on Bleecker Street to shop at and has declared November 23 “Shop Bleecker Day,” where participating shops will provide deals and discounts. (amNewYork)

Virginity tests are still a thing in the year 2019. A bill was introduced to ban them in New York. This is, of course, coming into headlines now because T.I. admitted in an interview that he forces his 18-year-old daughter to undergo hymen checks annually, which is awful. (Gothamist)

While Staten Island is still a part of New York City (you can read about that in yesterday’s edition of The Briefly), it has a new dockless bike program. Beryl will operate 1,000 bikes across the island starting in the spring. (Streetsblog)

Take a look inside (renderings of) Disney’s upcoming Hudson Square HQ. (amNewYork)

The governor gave National Grid two weeks to hook up new customers of he will revoke their franchise to supply gas to New York City. (Gothamist)

The NYPD’s illegal database of children’s fingerprints was confirmed to be destroyed after a years-long investigation into it by the Legal Aid Society. (Patch)

“Wegmans is not good enough to be your destination food court.” Eater reviews the food at Wegmans. (Eater)

OMNY is hitting more subway stations next month, including Penn Station. (6sqft)

A guide to OMNY. (Curbed)

The city fines landlords for lead, but rarely ever collects. Even the highest estimates put the figure at 10%. (Gothamist)

The new age for tobacco or e-cigarette purchases is now 21 years old. (amNewYork)

Seven ways to fix your overheated apartment. Yes, “open the windows” is number one. (StreetEasy)

14 spectacular pie shops. (Eater)

Thanks to Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for November 7, 2019 – The “Lubing Up the Cube in Astor Place” Edition

A list of lying NYPD officers, low voter turnout in this year’s elections, no one wants to live in Turtle Bay, the best coffee shop in the US, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The sweet spot for rent in the city might be $2,700 and four other things you need to know about the city’s real estate market. (StreetEasy)

The life, death, and rebirth of the Orchard Street pedestrian mall, the only street in the city that closes on Sundays to become a pedestrian mall. (Bowery Boogie)

A look at how gentrification has changed Fort Greene. (NY Times)

How does the cube in Astor Place stay able to spin? It gets lubed. (EV Grieve)

Commercial rent control may be how the city fights the retail vacancy crisis. (Gothamist)

Death certificates for overdoses in New York state must state a type of opioid thanks to a bill signed into law by Governor Cuomo on Tuesday. (amNewYork)

“The Seated IV” from Wangechi Mutu, which sits outside the Met as part of the facade, will be on display until June, instead of coming to an end in January. (NY Times)

Gothamist/WNYC has been fighting to get the secret list that each of the five borough District Attorneys maintains of cops who have been accused of dishonesty. Thanks to a successful Freedom of Information request, a three-page list of liar cops from the Brooklyn DA’s office was released on Wednesday. (Gothamist)

Who wants to live in Turtle Bay or Midtown? That question might be harder to answer than you think. Of the entire city, those are the two neighborhoods with the most real estate price drops in October. (amNewYork)

The best restaurants in Inwood. (The Infatuation)

Not much of the city voted on Tuesday. Only 13.9% of registered voters actually voted. While early voting was supposed to make voting easier, the locations were limited to 33 across the entire city. The mayor is hoping to increase that number to 100 for the 2020 election. (amNewYork)

James O’Neill is leaving his commissionership with the NYPD for a security job at Visa. (Patch)

The best coffee shop in the USA is Sey Coffee on Grattan Street in Bushwick, according to Food & Wine magazine. (Patch)

The definitive guide to the Hudson Yards development boom. (Curbed)

A $50 million triplex penthouse on Central Park West, once belonging to Demi Moore and Bruce Willis, can be yours if you’ve got $50 million lying around. (StreetEasy)

The president will return to the city that hates him to kick off Monday’s Veteran’s Day parade in Manhattan. This just went from parade to shit show. (amNewYork)

Where to go for affogato, the city’s newest must-try dessert, vanilla gelato with espresso poured over it. (Eater)

The Long Island City Clock Tower is going to go through a restoration that will start and end next year. (LIC Post)

120,000 pounds of clothes were collected for donation at the start of the NYC Marathon, with those clothes going to Goodwill. Since 2012 a million pounds have been collected and donated. (amNewYork)

Once the L train’s signal updates are complete, the M train is the next line to be upgraded and inconvenienced by late-night service disruptions while they’re being installed. (amNewYork)

Billy Eichner remains the only person I want one of the hundreds that call Met Life Stadium home. (Gothamist)

The best restaurants in Sunnyside and Woodside. (Grub Street)