The Briefly for August 13, 2019 – The “Polling at 0.11% and Not Giving Up” Edition

Corey Johnson opposes the 14th St busway, a Keith Haring work is getting restored, how much can a roommate save you, the history of Gotham, and more in today’s daily NY news digest.

Get ready for some heavy patches of rain today and through tomorrow morning. Good news, it will be clear for John Trivialta at Parklife on Wednesday night! (Patch)

After 100 years of business on the Bowery, Faerman Cash Register Co. has closed its doors for the last time. It’s not high rent that’s pushing them out, it’s real estate taxes. As a result, the family is putting the building up for sale. (Untapped Cities)

Never a person who learns from failure, the mayor says he plans on campaigning even when he doesn’t qualify for the third set of Democratic primary debates in September. The mayor received 23 out of about 20,000 votes in the Iowa “Corn Poll” last week. (Politico)

A video surfaced of the horrific car crash on Coney Island Avenue in Midwood that resulted in the killing of Park Slope’s Jose Alzorriz. This is the second death on Coney Island Avenue in a month and one of 578 crashes in the last year. The mayor was distracted from eating corn dogs and walking around Iowa while polling at 0% support long enough to give a statement. (Gothamist)

Ten secrets of Gracie Mansion, the home of the mayor when he’s actually in the city. (Untapped Cities)

Patience and Fortitude, the lions outside the New York Public Library, are going to be laser cleaned and have their cracks repaired (the cement ones). (6sqft)

Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson story “The Lightning Thief” is getting a limited run on Broadway that starts in September and runs through January. Also headed to broadway? “Diana,” a musical about Princess Diana will begin in the same theater as “The Lightning Theif” in March. (NY Times)

87 percent of NYCHA apartments went without heat or hot water at some point last winter. Believe it or not, that number represents a decrease from the previous winter. (Curbed)

Layleen Cubilette-Polanco’s family is suing the city for placing her in solitary confinement when her medical conditions should have forbidden the Department of Corrections from placing her there. (Patch)

We are a month away from the 25th anniversary of ‘Friends’ dominating the city, so the release of a Central Perk LEGO set shouldn’t be a surprise. (6sqft)

Should you move to New York City? Probably not. (Curbed)

The city’s annual topless parade is August 25, one day before Women’s Equality Day, which starts on W 58th and Eighth Ave and continues to Bryant Park. (amNY)

Keith Haring’s “Crack is Wack” on Harlem River Drive in East Harlem is being restored. (6sqft)

“When you see someone being ableist to you or someone else, don’t ignore it, correct it. And for the record, if you see a complete stranger who is also differently-abled, it’s not weird to say “hi.” In a world full of abled body people it’s nice to know that there is someone just like us.” -Sasha Bogen, 2019 graduate of Achievement First Brooklyn High School (Kings County Politics)

The NYPD admitted it subpoenas Google and uses location data collected from Google Maps and other Google applications in order to locate suspects or witnesses. (Gothamist)

Veggie Castle is expanding into Brooklyn. (Time Out)

Arthur Schwartz is the public face of the 14th St busway opposition and protests are scheduled on Wednesday outside of his W. 12th St home. (The Villager)

Corey Johnson, who has regularly stated he wants to break the city’s car culture came out in opposition of the 14th St busway. (amNY)

Roommates in NYC. Can having one save you money? How much can they save you? Let’s find out. (Curbed)

Where did the “Gotham” nickname come from? It’s an insult lobbed at the city by Washington Irving of “Sleepy Hollow” and “Rip Van Winkle” fame. (StreetEasy)

The mayor is questioning the circumstances surrounding Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide. (NY Times)

Should government-run and -affiliated pension funds divest from fossil fuel company stock? A look at the politicians pro and anti divestment. (Gotham Gazette)

After her defeat in the Queens DA primary, what’s next for Tiffany Cabán? (NY Times)

Prescriptions for free fruits and vegetables? Yes, as apart of the Pharmacy to farm program. (Huff Post)

Williamsburg’s L’industrie Pizzeria sits atop Eat This, Not That’s list of the best pizza in the state of New York. (Patch)

The best new restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for May 5, 2019 – The “Pole Dancing Rats Are So Last Week” Edition

The future of Sunnyside Yards, dollar oysters, the prettiest block in the city, Jeff Bezos buys an apartment, the appeal of a rear-facing apartment and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Is this a video of cops fighting each other in Harlem, or is it a video of people dressed as cops fighting each other in Harlem? That stupid question is what the NYPD would like you to ask. (Gothamist)

Rumors keep saying that New York City Transit president Andy Byford is on his way out the door. Someone tell Andy, because he reportedly just signed a new lease. (Gothamist)

Let’s not forget the cold history between the governor and Byford, who spend the first few months of the year never speaking to one another directly. (Second Ave Sagas)

Maybe Andy should leave. Governor Cuomo is cutting over three billion from the MTA budget over the next three years. (Daily News)

Pole dancing rats on the subway are so last week. This week it’s all about a loose bat on the F Train. (Gothamist)

The views ain’t great, the light is limited, but it’s hard to fight the appeal of a rear-facing apartment. (StreetEasy)

The Yemeni bodega owners’ protest of the New York Post has cost the newspaper an estimated $270,000 since the protest started two months ago. (The Indypendent)

Get ready wave hello to Rikers Island’s latest prisoner: Paul Manafort. (Patch)

The Death By Audio Arcade’s new home at Wonderville is open on the border of Bushwick and Bed-Stuy. Take a look at photos of the inside. (Gothamist)

Bumble is opening a cafe and wine in Soho this fall. According to Bumble, it’ll also be a place to hold business meetings and meet friends, so if you see a non-single friend in there, don’t freak out. (6sqft)

Apparently, NYC is a great place for a staycation. That’s a great suggestion because people keep dying on Mount Everest. (Patch)

Linda Fairstein, one of the lead prosecutors of the Central Park Five case, resigned her position at Vassar after a student petition with over 10,000 signatures was asking for her full removal. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’ve been asking yourself “electric mopeds, smart cars, bikes, what’s next?” San Francisco is about to receive rentable pogo sticks. (Curbed)

Rent is high, but at least we’re not San Francisco. (Viewing NYC)

If you’re pool hunting this summer, don’t forget to check out Roosevelt Island’s Manhattan Park Pool Club. (Curbed)

Bluestockings in the Lower East Side gets the Atlas Obscura treatment. (Atlas Obscura)

Pastis has reopened after a five-year hiatus. (NY Times)

He couldn’t get a three billion dollar tax break, but Jeff Bezos willing to pay $80 million for a 17,000 square foot apartment in 212 Fifth Ave. (The Real Deal)

10 important lighthouses in the city. Honestly, can you think of one lighthouse in the city? You’re probably surprised there’s enough for a list. (6sqft)

A brief history of SummerStage in Central Park. (Gothamist)

New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams was arrested during a tenants-rights protest in Albany. (Patch)

Eight people have been arrested as part of the city’s crackdown of fake parking placards. Maybe next they’ll address abuse of legitimate placards. (amNY)

Declawing cats is now illegal in the state of New York. (NY Times)

The whole Governors Ball situation just keeps getting worse. The latest is accusations that the guards used excessive force. (BrooklynVegan)

Leonard Swanson, an NYPD officer, was suspended after allegedly choking his girlfriend on Monday night. (Gothamist)

Station Square: “The Prettiest Block in New York” (NY Mag)

2019 could be the busiest year for the city’s skyline. 16 towers are being planned or are currently under construction that top out at over 1,000 feet. To give perspective, there are currently only nine towers in the city at that height. (NY Times)

Could the Sunnyside Yards project become the next Hudson Yards? With a possible 24,000 new apartments built over the railroad yard decks, is a second Hudson Yards a reasonable idea for a borough that already has Long Island City’s luxury housing and could the project still happen without the inclusion of luxury housing? (The Indypendent)

Dollar oyster deals in the city, mapped. (Eater)

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The Briefly for June 4, 2019 – The “If 311 Doesn’t Work, Try A Lawsuit” Edition

the G train lentil soup experiment, sex work is at the center of the Queens DA race, Gov Ball organizers apologize, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Missed this yesterday, but the advice for the subway after 10pm this week is “maybe not.” Service changes will be disrupting nearly every line somewhere. (6sqft)

The organizers of Governors Ball are attempting to stave off the Fyre Festival comparisons with a “transparent” backstory to what the hell happened with Sunday’s cancelations that led to people being stuck on Randall’s Island. (BrooklynVegan)

RIP “Service Changes.” Hello “Train Rerouted,” “Express to Local,” and “Multiple Impacts.” (Gothamist)

The city is already more annoying than last year, and the 311 noise complaints are proof, but here’s an interesting alternative. After complaints went nowhere, Mike Edison threatened to sue in small claims court, and it’s been working. (NY Times)

The Newtown Creek nature walk, which is really quite pleasant but has an air of being unfinished, is being expanded by the Department of Environmental Protection and connected to the eastern side of Whale Creek. (Curbed)

Inside Cowboy Technical Services, a recording studio celebrating twenty years in the city. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Hundreds of students staged an hourslong sit-in at LaGuardia High School to protest a perceived dilution of LaGuardia’s arts focus in favor of stricter academic requirements. (NY Times)

Sex work is shaping this year’s Queens DA election, with candidates trying to thread the needle of decriminalizing sex work while also eradicating the forced sex work and trafficking industry. (amNY)

If you’re wandering in Central Park looking for something new, try to find the somewhat hidden sundial that’s just inside Inventor’s Gate at East 72nd Street. When you’re there, snag a photo and tag @TheBrieflyNYC on Instagram (Ephemeral New York)

An ice cream parlor for dogs? Yes, it’s in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

OMNY is on its way into the hearts of New Yorkers. The first full weekend of its rollout saw 6,100 taps, which isn’t bad for only being available at 16 stations and on Staten Island buses. (amNY)

The World Trade Center is still unfinished. The Port Authority and Lower Manhattan Development Corporation reached a deal to move forward with a request for proposals for 5 World Trade Center, the last piece of land. With 18 years on, construction may never be finished. (Curbed)

Staten Island’s 11 oldest buildings. (Untapped Cities)

It’s been a year since the mayor called for changes to the city’s specialized high school admissions exams. What’s changed? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Raines sandwich, “an old desiccated ruin of dust-laden bread and mummified ham or cheese,” has its roots in New York’s very odd pre-prohibition drinking laws. (Atlas Obscura)

NYC’s poverty rate is down, but nearly one in five New Yorkers are still technically poor. (Patch)

Poor Jake Dobkin, whose experience with Revel, the city’s newest alternative transportation kid on the block which offers mopeds by the minute, was not ideal. Hey Jake, I’ve been waiting for my account to be approved since Saturday, so you should feel lucky you were even able to sign up! (Gothamist)

Thomas Keller and his restaurants Per Se and the French Laundry go to trial today for a pregnancy discrimination lawsuit, where they are being sued for $5 million for allegedly pushing out a staffer after she became pregnant. (Eater)

Here’s what you need to know about the Puerto Rican Day Parade this Sunday. (Curbed)

The NYC holy grail: 1-bedrooms under $1,500. (StreetEasy)

Especially considering that one-bedroom rents are at an all-time high of $2,980/month. (Curbed)

The Williamsburg “Link” buses meant to divert people from the L train to alternatives were cut from the city’s bus lineup due to a lack of use. In their place will the new B91 and B92 routes. (Gothamist)

At the last moment, the mayor is showing his support for rent control laws and marijuana legalization on a state-wide level. The legislative session ends on June 19, and at the moment neither proposal is a sure thing. (amNY)

Inside the great G train lentil soup experiment. (Gothamist)

Lyme Disease rates are down in the city for the first time in five years. Everyone wear your knee-length socks all summer! (Patch)

The 7 train tracks continue to fall apart, dropping debris on the streets below. This week it was Roosevelt Ave near 53rd St that received a free souvenir from the MTA. A reminder that the MTA feels that netting isn’t necessary to protect people from its literally crumbling infrastructure. (Jackson Heights Post)

14 essential BBQ restaurants. (Eater)

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