The Briefly for October 23 – 24, 2020 – The “2,400 Subway Cars on the Ocean Floor” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The new Rudy Giuliani fiasco, the city is behind on hundreds of reporting deadlines, median rents in Manhattan fall under $3k, and more

Today – Low: 61˚ High: 66˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 46˚ High: 70˚

If you need some fresh hell to wade through, there’s the Giuliani story coming out of the new Borat movie. Never in my life did I want to be reading this much analysis if Rudy Giuliani was touching his dick or not, but here we are. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The attorney behind the lawsuit trying to shut down the temporary homeless shelter on the Upper West Side, Randy Mastro, had his townhouse vandalized. Couldn’t have happened to a nicer guy. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Video: What do you call 2,400 subway cars at the bottom of the ocean? A good start! Just kidding. Let’s ask a marine biologist. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

What the hell is going on at city hall that they’ve missed hundreds of deadlines to provide statistical reports? Name a department and they’ve blown a deadline. (Claudia Irizarry Apone for The City)

Among the list of things the city hasn’t reported on? School attendance data. You might say that they’re… absent. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Photos: New York City’s most impressive Halloween decorated house. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The time for baking artisanal bread is over. Welcome to the era of funfetti cake. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

Apartment Porn: Susan Sarandon’s Chelsea duplex sold for $7.9 million. That’s a lot of ping pong money. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Nothing to see here, just NYPD officers Kyle Erickson and Elmer Pastran caught on video planting pot on someone during a traffic stop. They’ve been caught doing it before too. The Staten Island DA says he sees no criminal activity. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

An elderly woman in the Seward Park Co-op on the Lower East Side had been living with her husband’s rotting corpse for the last two weeks. 2020. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

The MTA has released a new nearly real-time subway map. While the animations are cool and having it be “real time” is cool, “How real is real-time? You’re still getting some train data minutes after it comes in.” (Christopher Bonanos for Curbed)

Travel isn’t banned, but the governor thinks you shouldn’t be going to Connecticut or New Jersey right now. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

New Jersey appears to be headed towards a second Covid-19 wave. (Karen Yi for Gothamist)

Just in case the city’s new Covid-19 restrictions weren’t confusing enough, the state has instituted a new microcluster strategy. At this point, trying to round up how this works is beyond this email. (Jesse McKinley and J. David Goodman for NY Times)

Check the map, enter your address to check your zone. (Arcgis)

Nothing to see here, just a prisoner who escaped police custody Thursday morning outside Harlem Hospital. (Nick Garber for Patch)

Go on a hike without needing a car. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Environmentalists stormed the headquarters of National Grid in Downtown Brooklyn Thursday calling for state ownership over the local power grid. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

10 local illustrators on how New Yorkers feel about the upcoming election. I just want it to be over already. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

New York City is suing the federal government over the whole “Anarchist Jurisdiction” thing. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Millions of Republican dollars are flowing into Staten Island in an attempt to push out freshman Congressperson Max Rose in support of his Republican opponent Nicole Malliotakis. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Photos: The Village Halloween parade is canceled, so this photo gallery set might be your way to enjoy Halloween in the Village. (Tequila Minsky for amNewYork Metro)

24 percent of the city’s subway and bus workers have had Covid-19. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Keep your eyes peeled for these @WildCityNYC flyers strewn about the city. Learn things like which birds are “FAST AS F*CK” or what famous hot duck is currently “MISSING” or who the real “NEW YORK GIANTS” are. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A Manhattan “milestone” has been reached: Median rents fell below $3,000. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

Photos: Check out the world’s largest pumpkins at the New York Botanical Garden. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

29 top Vietnamese restaurants in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The Briefly for October 4-5 2020 – The “Is It Finally Time To Find A New Apartment?” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The mayor is robbing the city to pay for his ferries, delivering comforting words with your pizza, Hillary Clinton talks art, and more

Today – Low: 54˚ High: 67˚
Clear throughout the day.

Have you been seeing comedy shows popping up in unconventional places? Well, it’s because comedy is technically illegal anywhere food and drinks are sold. (Sasha von Olderhausen)

The $100 million cut to the Sanitation department seems to have hit the Bronx the hardest. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Is this a good time to find a new apartment? (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

Yeah, rents might be seeing a temporary drop, but it seems like New York City is still on its way to having the highest rent in the country. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A Human Rights Watch report called the NYPD’s actions against protesters on June 4 in Mott Haven “intentional, planned, and unjustified.” The mayor continues to defend the NYPD’s actions, but finally admitted the NYPD’s targeting and assault of legal observers was wrong. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayorally controlled city Economic Development Corporation diverted tens of millions of dollars in rent receipts from publicly owned Times Square real estate holdings to help operate the costly NYC Ferry system. In the middle of a pandemic and budget crisis, maybe it’s not the best time to steal from the city to pay for Mayor de Blasio’s pet projects. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The MTA honored Medgar Evers by renaming the Franklin Ave and President St stations after the civil rights icon and the college that bears his name. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

There’s been enough happening this week before Rock Moranis was randomly punched in the head by a random attacker on Friday morning. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

If you need some comforting words, try ordering from Vinnie’s. In addition to your pizza you can get comforting words for $1. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

The house where Goodnight Moon and The Runaway Bunny was written in is in Greenwich Village. On March 5, 1967, it was put on a flatbed truck on the Upper East Side and moved to where it sits today. (Sydney Rose for Atlas Obscura)

The MTA is getting some work done ahead of schedule at the Sutphin Blvd.-Archer Ave E train station, taking advantage of the moment’s low ridership. The work will conclude by November 2. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

“The local government’s responsibility is to enforce the law.” – Governor Cuomo is making more threats towards the city, this time accompanied by a $10,000 daily fine for lack of enforcement. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Add the nearly 70-year-old Old John’s Luncheonette on the Upper West Side to the list of restaurants that have closed in the pandemic. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Things are awful. It’s okay to talk about art sometimes. Here’s an interview with Hillary Clinton about her love of Broadway. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

A guide to better understanding the city’s Covid-19 data. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Something strange is happening in Boro Park when it comes to Covid-19. Anonymous Yiddish robocalls are targeting Boro Park and Williamsburg urging people against getting tested “as this drives up the numbers,” in the Bobov Hasidic community, leaders are encouraging anyone who already had the virus to get tested to also drive the numbers down, and there are reports that some providers are withholding reporting test results. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Alright, it’s currently flu season and it’s been Covid-19 season since February. Here’s how to identify different symptoms of either. (Donald G. McNeil Jr for NY Times)

The biryani delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

This story is about how the governor sent Trump a “recovery basket” of buffalo wings, bagels, and cheesecake, but also did you know that Cuomo declared the official state snack to be Greek yogurt in 2014? (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Holy shit, Cellino & Barnes’ Steve Barnes died in a plane crash. (Juliana Kim for NY Times)

Brooklyn’s Third Avenue claimed another life as a bicyclist was hit and killed by a motorcyclist on Saturday morning. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Staten Island to NYC regarding budget woes: “Don’t tread on me.” (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

“The time to address this challenge is now – before the area’s growth and changes cause even more displacement. Industry City will grow and change even without their proposed rezoning. The campus will continue to attract more jobs and more residents. We cannot pretend these changes aren’t occurring. Sunset Park must vigorously preserve the affordable units it has, better protect tenants and begin to support development without displacement that creates truly and permanently affordable housing.”
-Michelle de la Uz, Executive Director of Fifth Avenue Committee & Neighbors Helping Neighbors, Industry City is dead, but Sunset Park still needs help for amNewYork Metro

NYC has a corn maze. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Bronx Zoo’s holiday light show is returning this November for something to do outdoors while we’re still locked indoors. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Everything is canceled, so here are 8 places to personally celebrate Oktoberfest. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

Thanks to reader Sarah for today’s featured photo from the Staten Island side of the Verrazzano.

The Briefly for August 6, 2020 – The “NYC is Horny for Books” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: More on the mayor firing Dr. Oxiris Barbot, the MTA’s bad options to continue operating, where to eat in Queens, can you afford an apartment, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 81˚
Rain overnight.

Liquored up ice cream is now legal in New York. The new liquor ice cream can be alcoholic up to 5% by volume. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Photos and Video: Inside an abandoned Brooklyn warehouse and a look at the treasures left behind. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

In parts of the city, the fireworks stopped shortly after July 4. Apparently Norwood didn’t get the message because there was a 45-minute fireworks display over the weekend in a memorial for James Wimmer, who was a lifelong resident, on what would have been his 45th birthday. In 45 minutes, how many police showed up? Exactly zero. (Norwood News)

Mayor de Blasio wants you to know that he fired Dr. Oxiris Barbot, the city’s former health commissioner, and she did not resign in protest. Yes, it makes total sense to fire your top health official in the middle of a health crisis. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The city’s libraries’ grab-and-go service has proven one thing: New Yorkers are horny for reading. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Why did Mayor de Blasio push Dr. Oxiris Barbot out in the middle of a pandemic? He says he wants the “atmosphere of unity.” Nothing says unity like people quitting your administration in frustration and forcing out the top health official in the middle of a health emergency. That must also be why you keep around NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea, who shit talks in public. Bill, we all know you’re a simp for cops. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

There are six botanical gardens you can visit in the city this summer. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

A look through the archives of the Brooklyn Eagle at Irving Kaufman’s photography, with a focus this week on NYC construction in the 1930’s. (Phil Kaufman for Brooklyn Eagle)

RIP Pete Hamill, a celebrated NYC reporter whose work was featured in nearly any publication you can name. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

There were still nearly 100,000 customers without power after Tropical Storm Isaias on Wednesday night as ConEd reports it may take days to restore power across the city. Governor Cuomo directed the Department of Public Service to investigate ConEd’s response to the storm. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

If you thought that the city’s bootleg bartenders selling drinks from coolers was going to dwindle in the pandemic, you’re wrong. (Avery Stone for Eater)

With Isaias fresh in mind and with repairs from Hurricane Sandy still going, it’s a good time to examine the loopholes that allow home sellers from disclosing if their home may flood or not. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Where to get takeout and delivery in Queens, updated for August. (Eater)

It’s like a “Why I’m leaving New York” personal essay, but it’s about a restaurant. Why the Banty Rooster is leaving New York. (Matthew Sedacca with Delores Tronco-DePierro and John DiPierro for Grub Street)

The city will be installing checkpoints to identify out-of-state travelers who are required to quarantine and handing out fines up to $10,000 for violations. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced firings of 79 employees, 181 furloughs, and 93 voluntary retirements. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

This is a good link to have when someone asks you if you think they can afford an apartment in NYC: What is a good rent-to-income ratio in NYC. I’ve always used the 40:1 rule, but this goes a bit deeper. (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

“If you’ve never been to courts in New York City, even the newest buildings are teeming with people and their germs. Just to call a single case, there have to be at least 10 people in the room. One judge. One clerk. One court reporter. Four court officers. One prosecutor. One defense attorney. One person who stands accused of a crime and possibly their family members. So when OCA tells us that it will only have 10 cases on at once, that doesn’t mean just 10 people confined to one courtroom, but many, many more, all at risk of contracting and spreading the same virus that killed so many, including my colleague.”
-Martha Lineberger, public defender for the Legal Aid Society, Lives Hang in the Balance as Courts Resume In-Person Work for City Limits

Welcome to the first day after Governor Cuomo’s eviction moratorium is over. Without protections form the state, this could be the start of mass evictions and a huge jump in preventable homelessness in the city. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

NYC will dedicate a team of contact tracers to investigate coronavirus cases in schools, but based on the city’s contact tracing program so far (reminder: the NY Times called it a “disaster”), don’t get your hopes too high. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Go home, NY Times, you’re drunk. Headline: New York’s Sidewalk Prophets Are Heirs of the Lascaux Cave Artisans (Seph Rodney for NY Times)

According to RentHop’s rental report, rents dropped 5% year-over-year in Manhattan. (RentHop)

A rundown of all of the bad options the MTA has now that it seems clear that the federal government is not going to be helping and congestion pricing isn’t happening anytime soon. Reduced service with raised fares? Check. Signal upgrade delays? Check. Shelving new construction? Check. It’s like a Choose Your Own Adventure book, but every choice past page one is bad. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

The best places to eat sushi outside” is a very 2020 headline. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)