The Briefly for April 13, 2020 – The “Cutting Your Hair Yourself at Home” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Inside the latest fight between de Blasio and Cuomo, a clarification on the mass burials on Hart Island, caterers go delivery, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 65˚
Rain and dangerously windy until evening.

Photos: NYC landmarks lit up blue in support of frontline COVID-19 workersª. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A look at what happens to NYC rents during a recession. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Absolutely have to cut your hair and stuck at home? Advice on how to cut your hair at home from salons across the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Poll: 56% of Democrats polled by Club for Growth would prefer Cuomo over Biden for 2020. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

Governor Cuomo is setting a high bar for himself coming out of the COVID-19 pandemic. On Good Morning America, he said “There has to be some lesson that we take from this so we’re better for it because we paid a very high price. One of them is, let’s understand what happened with the African American/Latino communities, and let’s fix it and let’s understand broadly how this lapped and what we missed so this doesn’t happen again.” (Gillian Smith for Patch)

Who was at fault between de Blasio and Cuomo for the public debate about who can close the city’s schools? It’s de Blasio, of course. Before making his “we’re closing the schools” announcement, de Blasio left a text message with the governor a few minutes before making the announcement. (Jesse McKinley, Eliza Shapiro and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

It was only a few hours before the governor had to teach Mayor de Blasio who has the legal authority to close the city’s schools. The answer, by the way, is Governor Cuomo. (Sally Goldenberg and Anna Gronewold for Politico)

The MTA claims overcrowding isn’t a problem on the subways, Mayor de Blasio isn’t buying it. The mayor wants the MTA to increase their capacity, but the MTA’s workforce has been his disproportionally hard by COVID-19. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The MTA is checking temperatures of its workers at 22 of its locations to test 2,000 workers a day. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

58 of the city’s 110 nursing facilities have been cited for infection control problems. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

If you want a look at what NYC’s pandemic open streets could have been, take a look at Oakland’s plan for 74 miles of streets for cyclists and pedestrians. (Roger Rudick for Streetsblog)

A clarification on the bodies buried on Hart Island, the mayor has said that anyone who has a family or friend who wants to make funeral arrangements, the body will be held until it is possible. Unclaimed bodies will be interred on Hart Island. (Robert Rozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Fairway is trying to argue in bankruptcy court that its bonuses of $2.3 million for executives are well deserved. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

A $769,000 studio that’s roughly 350 square feet on Billionaire’s Row is being called “reasonable” by 6sqft. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Metropolitan Opera is continuing its streams of opera performances this week. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

A guide to the city’s caterers that are pivoting to home delivery. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

The Briefly for March 20, 2020 – The “Someone Check on Jen Carlson” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: COVID-19, how to help restaurants, landlords find a loophole in the eviction moratorium, some mortgages are paused, alcohol delivery & pickup guide, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 72˚
Possible light rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 34˚ High: 50˚

Governor Cuomo suspended mortgage payments for anyone who lost hours or is working part-time. The full details of who is eligible are not available yet, but it’s a step in the right direction. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Okay but what about rent? (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

If you heard that New York was freezing medical and student debt, you didn’t hear the whole story. As usual, it’s more complicated than it sounds and isn’t nearly as wide-spread as it should be. It specifically refers to delinquent debt owed to state-run institutions that were been referred to the Attorney General’s office for collection. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

In the era of coronavirus, 911 calls are getting weird. (EV Grieve)

Someone check on Jen Carlson at Gothamist, because she seems to have fallen in love with the pre-Governor Cuomo press briefing announcement music and dubbed it “Cuomocore.” (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Chinatown’s Nom Wah Tea Parlor is 100-years old. It’s seen the Great Depression, multiple wars, and now COVID-19. Can it survive? (Joshua David Stein for Grub Street)

Video: A bike ride through a desolate Chinatown. (ActionKid)

Whole Foods added an early hour for customers over 60 to allow the most vulnerable to COVID-19 to feel comfortable while shopping for necessities. (EV Grieve)

Our parks will never go unappreciated again, they’ve provided us with a place to go and still stay distant from other New Yorkers. (Ariama Long for Kings County Politics)

“We’re writing to let you know that a positive case of the coronavirus (COVID-19) was found at our facility today.” -A text sent on Wednesday announcing COVID-19 had found its way inside of an Amazon warehouse in Queens. (Olga Khazan for The Atlantic)

Amazon reopened the warehouse after four hours, saying it was disinfected, but employees are skeptical and continue their calls for the company to do more to protects its workforce. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is still cleaning up the panic and confusion that Mayor de Blasio created when he off-handedly decided to make a comment about how he may order the city to shelter-in-place. The governor is the only person who can declare that and he has said multiple times that he never would. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The mayor, desperate, asked Elon Musk for help making ventilators via Twitter. Elon Musk’s companies have never made ventilators, but that didn’t stop him from Tweeting that he thinks that they could. (Danielle Muoio for Politico)

Are you stir-crazy enough to sing “Yellow Submarine” with your neighbors? (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

A judge put a moratorium on new eviction cases last week, so why can new eviction cases still be filed this week? Landlords have, of course, found a loophole and the confusion is dangerous. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Photos: The city’s transit hubs are barren. (Michelle Young with photos by Aaron Asis for Untapped New York)

The governor further restricted the maximum percent of any company that will be allowed to work onsite to 25% from the previously mandated 50%. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

There are free breakfast and lunch available at local schools for students, but not many are taking advantage of it. (Tribeca Citizen)

“Who cleans those outfits?” is not a common question when it comes to Broadway, but someone has to clean them, right? Unfortunately with Broadway closed, Tony Award winners Ernest Winzer Cleaners is hurting. They give out Tony awards for dry cleaning? I’ve got to re-align my EGOT strategy. (Nancy Coleman for NY Times)

Rose O’Donnell is bringing back ‘The Rosie O’Donnell Show,’ virtually, for one night to raise money for The Actors Fund. You can catch the show streaming on The Actors Fund’s YouTube channel on Sunday at 7 pm. There are over 40 guests lined up for the show. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A look at The Tiny Cupboard, the self-proclaimed “world’s smallest venue.” It’s up three flights of stairs, behind multiple doors and artist’s spaces, and yes, it’s in Bushwick. How did you know? (Serena Tara for Bedford + Bowery)

Add Marie’s Crisis to the list of streaming activities you can take part in during a… crisis. If you’re looking to get loaded and poorly belt out some Broadway tunes, here’s your opportunity. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

Biqtch Puddiń is bringing a drag show with over 20 performers to Twitch. You can catch Digital Drag: An Online Drag Show on Friday, March 20 at 7pm. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

New York City’s ambulance crews, which are stretched thin, have been told to work even if exposed to the coronavirus — as long as they are asymptomatic. Last week there was one paramedic infected, now 150 are in quarantine. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

As the city’s hospitals are becoming overwhelmed with patients, 1,000 retired health care professionals are returning to service. Between retired, student, and faculty volunteers, 1,746 have stepped up to help. (Adan Nichols for Patch)

An interview with Rafael Espinal, President of the Freelancers’ Union. (Tyler Wetherall for Brooklyn Based)

The Metropolitan Opera, the largest performing arts organization in the U.S., has laid off all of its union members, including all of the opera’s musicians, chorus singers, and stagehands. The remainder of the Met’s season has been canceled and union employees have been offered health care coverage through the crisis. Non-full-time performers are out of luck. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

This year is the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Wonder Wheel in Coney Island. One day we may be able to celebrate that. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

An interview with and lockdown advice from the author of “How to Drag a Body and Other Safety Tips You Hope to Never Need.” (Alix Strauss for NY Times)

15 NYC bookstores offering curbside pickup and delivery. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Stuyvesant High School admitted ten black students this year, up from seven last year, out of a freshman class of 760. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)
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A list of galleries that are creating online viewing rooms to exhibit art. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

A first look at Staten Island’s drive-through center for COVID-19 testing. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Eight Rikers Island detainees have shown COVID-19 symptoms after one inmate in his 30s tested positive. 40 detainees who are considered higher risk are being considered for release in an attempt to prevent further spread. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Use some of your time to do something good this weekend. The Library of Congress has a program called “By the People!,” which is asking for your help to transcribe significant documents. You can even do it while you re-watch Parks & recreation for the 2nd time this year. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

New York City Council Members Inez Barron (East New York, Brooklyn) and Richie Torres (Bronx) have tested positive for COVID-19. Inez Barron’s husband Assemblymember Charles Barron announced a few days ago he tested positive. (East New York News)

Dispatches from the last night of drinking in bars. (Nick McManus for Bedford + Bowery)

Here’s what restaurant and delivery workers need to know about the new paid sick leave laws. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

How to help restaurants and bars right now. One thing: Stop using Seamless or GrubHub to order. They haven’t waived their fees (which can be up to 25% of your bill), they’ve only deferred them. Use Seamless to make your decision, but actually call the restaurant and give them all your money directly. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The alcohol delivery & pick-up guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Chris for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 19, 2020 – The “Rat, Roach, and Mouse Census of 2020” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The East Village’s most resilient dive bar, Manhattan rents are the highest in the country, the best Italian restaurants in the West Village, and more

Today – Low: 29˚ High: 46˚
Clear throughout the day.

Another reminder to start bringing your tote bags around, because the plastic bag ban is coming. (Alyssa Paolicelli for NY1)

The story of The Hard Swallow, the East Village’s most resilient dive bar and its owners Sasha and Lee Lloyd. (Drew Schwartz for Vice)

A coalition of North Brooklyn residents and environmental groups are fighting to stop National Grid’s plan to extend a natural gas pipeline through Bushwick, Williamsburg and Greenpoint. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

A census of rats, roaches, mice, and vermin. After a special “rat academy,” the NYCHA is ready to count its pests. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

The NYPL has released a list of its favorite 125 books of all time. They aren’t ranked, so you don’t get to brag that your favorite Harry Potter book is #1. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Luna Park and its Italian owner company Zamperla have been trying to kick Lola Star Souvenir Boutique off the boardwalk for a decade and they finally got what they wanted after raising the rent on the gift shop 500% and “negotiating” down to 400%. Zamperla doesn’t care about Coney Island the neighborhood, they only care about owning Coney Island and this is proof. (Rose Adams)

High Fidelity’s filming locations, listed. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Do you operate an historic boat? Brooklyn Bridge Park would like to know if you want to show it off. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

Trader Joe’s is looking to expand on the Upper East Side in the former location of the Food Emporium under the Queensboro Bridge. (6sqft)

14 cozy bars to stay warm at all winter. (Lidia Ryan)

Congratulations to Manhattan for having the highest rents in the entire country for the month of January at $4,210. The national average is $1,463. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Apartment Porn: Inside the newly listed $8 million and $18 million apartments of the landmarked Steinway Building. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

President Trump pardoned former NYPD Commissioner Bernie Kerik, who was imprisoned from 2010 to 2013 on tax fraud and corruption charges. He accepted a quarter million dollars from a company tied to organized crime to renovate his apartment and lied to the Department of Homeland Security. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The MTA is boasting the best on-time performance since 2013 for January. Hidden in this article is the fun fact that congestion pricing will require federal approval, so that’s another fight we can all look forward to. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

What’s it take to be a “real” New Yorker? (Jessica Leibowitz and Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

FedEx and UPS receive over a thousand parking violations a day, but they’ll never pay the full price of the tickets they receive because they pay in bulk and at a steep discount, thanks to the Stipulated Fines and Commercial Abatement program. Offering an immediate discount on parking fines allows delivery companies to flout parking laws or clog the city’s street by parking illegally. The city’s attempted to update its double parking laws for trucks, but if these companies won’t pay for their violations what does it matter? City Councilmember Costa Consantinides put forward a bill to abolish the abatement program, but it’s stalled in committee. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

This is the headline: “Sexy Time for Tompkins Square Hawks” (Laura Goggin)

The New York City Planning Commission is looking into developing a 2.4 million-square-foot urban living complex close to the East New York, Brooklyn waterfront that includes 13 new buildings ranging in height from 2 stories to 17. (Gowanus Lounge)

The best Italian restaurants in the West Village. (Bryan Kim & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)