The Briefly for May 21, 2019 – The “Great White Sharks in NYC Waters” Edition

The city gets serious about Long Island City, the era of OMNY has arrived, the MTA cuts bus service and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The bill that would criminalize “texting while walking” is DOA. (Streetsblog)

“I told all my friends they’re never going to see me in the Staten Island Mall again.” (Curbed)

The new logo for privately owned public spaces was unveiled from 600 entries. It’s three chairs. (amNY)

Scared of sharks? A ten-foot long great white shark was spotted a few dozen miles from the city. Just in time for the holiday weekend! (Patch)

Right now students can get a half-priced MetroCards if they live within walking distance of their school. Students often wind up paying the remainder in coins, causing the bus system to grind to a halt. This is why the city wants to get rid of them in favor of free MetroCards, good for three rides a day from 5:30am to 8:30pm for school-related activities. (Patch)

A Brooklyn Community Board approved of a protected bike lane on Flatbush Avenue from Grand Army Plaza to Empire Blvd, mirroring Prospect Park West’s lanes. (Streetsblog)

The history of New York City’s original rooftop bars. (6sqft)

Punk Island added a slew of bands to the lineup of the free punk festival on Randall’s Island, with the addition of a stage whose goal is to raise awareness for mental health and drug addiction in addition to free Narcan training and distribution. (BrooklynVegan)

Photos from Saturday’s 13th Dance Parade in the East Village. (Gothamist)

Say hello to Summer Sucks, an ongoing series from Gothamist. (Gothamist, duh)

Where to get all dressed up and not feel stupid. (The Infatuation)

It seems that only now that Amazon’s HQ2 is a distant memory, city officials are getting serious about developing the Long Island City waterfront and this time around they’re including the neighborhood in the discussions. (The Real Deal)

The state’s Attorney General opened an inquiry into more than a decade of lending practices that left thousands of immigrant taxi drives in debt, while the mayor ordered an investigation into the brokers who arranged the loans. (NY Times)

No one wants to talk to Steve Doocy. (HuffPost)

The Vendy Awards, New York’s awards for street eats, will come to a close after 15 years. (Grub Street)

Attention. If you lost an absolutely gargantuan inflatable pink flamingo in the East River, it has been found. (Gothamist)

Idea: Buses can’t run late if there are no buses! The MTA is curring service on 13 bus lines this summer. (Streetsblog)

How’re the subways treating you? The MTA says they’ve hit a five-year high of being on time. The percentage? A solid C+ at 79.8%. (Sunnyside Post)

Welcome to the era of OMNY. (mtainfo)

Meet some of the 42 heroes who are fostering 90 kittens for the ASPCA. (amNY)

Four Department of Education executives claim that they are victims of “reverse racism.” (The Root)

Here’s a look at what’s open and closed on Memorial Day. (Patch)

A look back at the Coney Island that was, through the archive of the New York Times’ photography. (NY Times)

“I consider it a social experiment, I wanted to see how people would respond to this character.” The character the saran wrapped Shiva. (Bushwick Daily)

There has been an 82% rise in anti-semitic attacks in the city compared to last year. (Bklyner)

In light of the spike, Speaker Corey Johnson is calling on the mayor to fully fund the Office of Prevention of Hate Crimes, which was approved by the city council this winter. The mayor has only funded 70% of the office. (amNY)

A gang member who participated in the killing of 15-year-old Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz said that a mistake led to the attack. (NY Times)

The MTA reports that the L Train Slowdown is going as planned. Is anyone else tired of hearing about how resilient New Yorkers are? (amNY)

Congratulations to this year’s Obie Award winners. The Obies honor Off Broadway and Off Off Broadway work, and “What the Constitution Means to Me” was named best new American play. (NY Times)

“What is art,” you may ask yourself while looking at photos of slop buckets from a restaurant in Park Slope. (Viewing NYC)

24 ideal outdoor bars in the city. (Eater)

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The Briefly for April 30, 2019 – The “Luxury Living in a Toxic Waste Flood Zone” Edition

A gun buyback program in Queens, the NYPD strays from following the law, the new Airbnb/office building hybrid takes Rockefeller Center, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Borough President Melinda Katz put forward a plan to address Queens’ gun violence, including a 24/7 gun buyback program and new education programs. We’re two weeks from the primary for the Queens District Attorney and Katz is a candidate. (QNS)

The allergy forecast continues to be at “high” or “very High” without a sign of “moderate” in sight. Stay indoors. (Patch)

The 6 oldest buildings in the Bronx. (Untapped Cities)

30-story buildings on toxic waste sites that are in flood zones. Welcome to the Gowanus rezoning. (Curbed)

Another hidden tax. Restaurants have begun charging customers fees for paying with a credit card. (MarketWatch)

Photos from Sakura Matsuri Cherry Blossom festival at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden. (Gothamist)

Watch a time-lapse of the Goethals Bridge construction. (EarthCam)

Sounds like no one like Rhode Island style “pizza.” (Eater)

Welcome to the neighborhoods in the city with seven playgrounds for every 10,000 kids, the playground deserts. (Patch)

10 stories of a 33 story office building in Rockefeller Center will be converted from offices to Airbnbs. This is one of a few office/hotel hybrids coming to the city. (Curbed)

Take a historic tour of the 2,200 buildings of Greenwich Village, 50 years after it was given landmark designation. (6sqft)

Seems like The Palm is the new Spotted Pig. The chain is accused multiple times over of nurturing an atmosphere of sexual harassment. The restaurant’s attorney denies the claims. (Eater)

The story of how McGuinness Blvd became McGuinness Blvd, from its start as the cobblestone Oakland Street. (Greenpointers)

AOC had her first town hall, fielding questions about the Green New Deal and Amazon HQ2. (QNS)

Legal Aid is suing the city in an attempt to get the NYPD to actually follow the law and stop penalizing workers who use electric bikes for deliveries. (Gothamist)

The big boards at Grand Central Terminal are going all digital and it’s hard not to see that as a loss, no matter how convenient the upgrade may be. (Gothamist)

Uber and Lyft’s explosive growth in the city has stopped on a dime, as neither are hiring new drivers. The city’s pay regulations appear to be having the intended effect. Since the $17.22 minimum wage for drivers went into effect, drivers have earned $56 million more than they would have otherwise. (Politico)

The B39 bus gets the New York Times profile treatment. (New York Times)

Six of the season's best neighborhood food festivals. (6sqft)

Everything new you need to know about camping on Governors Island. (Time Out)

“IT WAS PROFISIZED [sic] IN THE LATE 20th CENTURY. AN Angel OF DEATH SHALL WASTE THIS PLACE. NOW I ASK YOU DO YOU BELIEVE IT TO BE TRUE?….THE DOCTOR.” No one asked for this on their mozzarella cheese packaging. (Gothamist)

“By entering these premises you agree not to run for President of the United States in 2020 or in any future presidential race,” says the signs at the YMCA that Mayor de Blasio visits to work out. Not all heroes wear capes. (Patch)

Early voting is likely coming to NYC. The mayor proposed 100 early voting sites for the 2019 general election, the 2020 presidential primary, and the 2020 June primary. (amNY)

The Right to Know Act went into effect in October, which mandated that NYPD officers give business cards to people they stop and ask permission to perform stop and frisk searches. According to the Justice Committee, they haven’t been doing either. (Patch)

The MTA’s express buses are no longer accept cash, but without the OMNY system and without MetroCard machines at express bus stops, some New Yorkers are feeling their commutes threatened. While less than 1% of people use cash, that 1% likely depend on it for their ability to pay the $6.75 fare. (Gothamist)

The five best burritos in New York this week. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for April 29, 2019 – The “Here Comes Another Disease We Have to Worry About” Edition

We have begun the era of the L Train Slowdown, there’s a struggle for control of Governor’s Island, Pete Davidson moves in with his mom, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are the late night subway diversions you can expect this week. (Subway Changes)

Rockefeller Center is turning into a sculpture park for Frieze New York. Tell that to your friend that wants to drag you up to Storm King. (Untapped Cities)

Are the NYPD’s gang raids about justice or vengeance? A new report from CUNY Law Professor Babe Howell shows most of the people caught in gang raids in the Bronx were not accused of violence. Many of the arrested’s offenses were already resolved or dismissed at the state level. (Gothamist)

Great to hear that we have another horrid disease to worry about. Chagas disease, the “kissing bug,” which is usually never found North of South Carolina. Climate change? What climate change? (Patch)

The state’s budget is at the heart of the constant back-and-forth between the state’s legislature and the governor. Queens Assemblymember Brian Barnwell is looking to change that with a proposed constitutional amendment that will wrestle some of the control away from the governor. (Gothamist)

“What do those hawks that fly around the city eat?” Well this one ate a damn pigeon in broad daylight while standing on top of a car. (Viewing NYC)

The city abandoned plans to bring 200 dockless bikes to Coney Island. Locals were worried that allowing bikes to be stashed anywhere would be chaos, even for a neighborhood nicknamed ‘Sodom by the Sea.’ (Brooklyn Paper)

How “protected” could a bike lane be if the only protection is some paint? (Streetsblog)

A look at the nine different bills that could change how rent works in New York state. (amNY)

This week’s high score violation points among the nine restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health is 99. (Patch)

The 2019 Astoria outdoor dining guide. Make a note for when you find yourself in Astoria this summer with no idea where to eat. (We Heart Astoria)

BABY LEMUR! (Wildlife Conservation Society)

The Lit. Bar is open, and the Bronx finally has a bookstore. (Curbed)

How much would you be willing to pay for a used MTA garbage can? Bet it’s not $375! (Gothamist)

RIP Michael Fesco, whose gay clubs were trendsetters in Manhattan and Fire Island. (NY Times)

The man who allegedly threw a cup on urine on two MTA workers has been arrested. Still super gross. (NBC New York)

New York Archdiocese named 115 priests and five deacons who were accused of sexually abusing a child. (NY Times)

The Daily Meal’s 101 best pizzas in the nation include 29 NYC pizzas. Not #1, which makes the whole list suspect. (Patch)

How New York is this beer? It’s literally made from bagels. (6sqft)

Ever move back in with your parents after a bad breakup? Pete Davidson bought a $1.3 million house with his mom on Staten Island. (The Real Deal)

It would be more surprising if the L Train Slowdown happened flawlessly. The problems with the slowdown started 30 minutes before the slowdown did. Before the trains were expected to arrive, the first train took 40 minutes. Eventually, the MTA hid their shame by taking their countdown clocks offline. But really, it the L train service any worse than what the MTAs been shoveling our way for years? (Gothamist)

It wasn’t a total disaster of a weekend, but let’s not get our hopes up too high. (amNY)

There’s a block in Jamaica where it appears the raccoons have taken over. Welcome to Trash Panda City. (Patch)

A look at the history of 143 East Houston, from church to fight club to Sunshine Cinema to wrecking ball. (Ephemeral New York)

Of New York City’s 10,000 bodegas, 4-6,000 of them are owned by Yemeni-Americans. In 2017, they closed their shows to protest President Trump’s travel ban. Now they’re taking a stand against the New York Post. (NY Times)

There’s a power struggle over who can control the fate of Governor’s Island as former Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen, Mayor de Blasio’s point person for his real estate initiatives, seemed to have pushed out Michael Samuelian, the President and CEO of the Trust for Governors Island, in a political power play. (Politico)

If you’re registered to vote and live in the city, the city’s Board of Elections has posted your name, address, and political party affiliation online. (WNYC)

Sick of tapas? Where to eat when you’re sick of being told to order 2-3 small plates each. (The Infatuation)

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