The Briefly for January 11, 2019 – The “Long On Promises, Short On Details” Edition

A closer look at the State of the City, “Rhode Island-style” pizza, election reform, UCB East is closing, a “bike mayor” for the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s scheduled subway service changes: The 5 is gonna be super slow, the 7, J and M trains are out between Queens and Manhattan, and that’s just the start of it. (6sqft)


Mayor Bill de Blasio’s 2019 State of the City address highlights:

Watch the 2019 State of the City address given by Mayor Bill de Blasio

Five takeaways from the State of the City. (NY Times)

“Plenty of money in the city. It’s just in the wrong hands!” The mayor preached distribution of wealth, came up short on the details. (NY Times)

The speech was focused on equality, workers and tenants’ rights, and income inequality, to go “bigger, bolder, and aim higher.” (Politico)

The city’s free 3-K program will expand to districts 6, 8, 9, 19 and 32. (Bklyner)

Bus speeds should increase 25% by the end of 2020 from 7.44 to 9.03 mph. Some tactics will be adding between 10 and 15 miles of dedicated lanes, revamp five miles, and installing barriers to protect bus lanes from drivers. The NYPD will also add a team of tow truck drivers dedicated to clearing bus lanes. (amNY)

New and modified ferry routes: Staten Island will be connected to Battery Park and W 39th Street and a new Coney Island line will stop at Bay Ridge on its way to Wall Street. The Soundview, South Brooklyn and Astoria routes will be expanded. (Curbed)

The mayor created the Office of Tenant Protection, whose details were long on promises and short on details. The office will seize the buildings of the city’s “worst landlords,” which is an interesting phrase considering the worst landlord in the city was recently declared to be… the city. (The Real Deal & Curbed)

Free eyeglasses will be provided to kindergarteners or first graders need them starting next school year in a partnership with Warby Parker. (Chalkbeat)

While the mayor touted successes on old pledges like the styrofoam ban and a plan to divest the city’s pensions from fossil fuels, there was no plans for new green initiatives. (Politico)

Also missing? The NYCHA crisis. (Gotham Gazette)


Albany is looking to make some sense out of our state’s elections, limiting donations from LLCs, create early voting, combining election days, voting by affidavit, and pre-registering to vote at the age of 16. (Politico)

The modernist treasures of Queens. (Curbed)

A Bike Mayor? Transportation Alternatives has a petition looking to add the position to champion cycling across city agencies. Is it any more odd than a “Night Mayor?” (Streetsblog)

The average jail population in the city is at its lowest since 1980. (Daily News)

UCB will close their East Village theater on February 9 amid financial problems. Some shows will be moved to SubCulture. (Vulture)

LIRR will begin service to Grand Central Terminal by the end of 2022. (6sqft)

The secrets of the St. Marks historic district. (6sqft)

The most dangerous neighborhood to walk in Queens? Flushing. (Streetsblog)

Okay, what the hell is “Rhode Island-style” pizza? (Bedford + Bowery)

A teacher who was fired for allegedly forcing black students to lie on the floor while she stepped on their backs is planning on suing the city for one billion dollars. (NY Post)

The 15 most anticipated restaurant openings this winter. (Eater)

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The Briefly for January 3, 2019 – The “Who Are These People Waiting In Hour Long Lines for Pizza” Edition

The Ridgewood serial toilet theif may have been caught, Manhattan apartments dip below $1 million, EGG ROLL SQUIRREL, Times Square on the water and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Six ways that 2019 will change New York City. (Curbed)

The city outlaws the LED billboards that have been seen on barges surrounding Manhattan, but there has ben zero enforcement. Welcome to our waterways, the new Times Square. (Gothamist)

The NYPD has arrested Kwame Johnson, the man who allegedly groped a 4-year-old girl on the subway last week. He was charged with sex abuse, forcible touching, acting in a manner injurious to a child, menacing, and harassment. (NY Post)

After becoming the surprise first New York attorney general in history, Barbara Underwood is going back to her post as solicitor general under newly elected Letitia James. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Finally, someone does the things the rest of us only think about doing. Asking the tourists waiting in line for pizza in DUMBO “WHY?” (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio announced Julie Menin, the head of the city’s film and television office, will add the role of Census Director to oversee the city’s implementation of the 2020 census. (Daily News)

The Wendy’s in Ridgewood can rest easy knowing that Richard Mirabile, their alleged serial toilet thief, was arrested last week. (Bushwick Daily)

The deadly six-car accident in Tribeca last weekend was caused by a car going 100 mph. Sherman Harrison hit Amy Philipson’s car, which flipped and burst into flames, killing Philipson. (NY Post)

Yes, the Brooklyn Borough President took the Coney Island Polar Bear Plunge this year, but also when was the last time any borough had president with visible abs? (Bklyner)

Cancel everything. Watch this squirrel eating an egg roll. (Gothamist)

Webster Hall returns in the spring of this year. Hipsters, prepare your complaints about how much better it was before. (BrooklynVegan)

The new campaign finance laws will get their first test during February’s public advocate election. The public advocate’s office has a budget of $3.5 million and the Board of Elections estimates the cost of the elections at $15 million. (NY Post)

The best bathtub in the city can be yours for the low cost of $7,000 per night. (NY Times)

Step back in time into a 1970’s bar in Murray Hill, just don’t expect 1970’s prices. (Eater)

A Manhattan federal jury cleared NYPD officer James Grant of charges of trading favors for gifts, including cash, diamonds, and sex on an airplane with a prostitute. His co-defendant Jeremy Reichenberg was found guilty of bribery and conspiracy charges. (Gothamist)

The city/state rivalry is bubbling up with the MTA trolling the mayor for not announcing any details about the Fair Fares program. (NY Post)

The median price of an apartment in Manhattan just barely dipped below $1 million for the first time since 2015. (NY Times)

Subway traffic on the Williamsburg Bridge came to a complete stop on Wednesday night because a dog had found its way onto the tracks. The dog was safely rescued. (NY Post)

The NYPD’s crackdown on e-bikes has been anything but fair to restaurant delivery workers. A new directive will shift enforcement of the e-bike ban towards the business and not the individual. From January 2018 through October, the city’ issued 509 citations to individuals and only 204 to businesses. (Gothamist)

Where to eat when you’re trying to not spend money. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for December 27, 2018 – The “Losing Your Job Over Poppy Seed Bagels” Edition

An NYPD’s accidental shooting victim sues the city, Long Island City primes its real estate, NYC’s immigration courts are a mess because of the government shutdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Let’s explore some NYC ghost stories, from the hellbeasts, to the Staten Island murder mansion, to the hellmouth at Hell’s Gate. (Gothamist)

There’s a ghost subway tunnel that sits above the Broadway stop on the G. The Second System was an abandoned 1929 expansion of the subway system, which would have included an additional tunnel between Williamsburg and Manhattan. That would have been helpful with the impending shutdown of the L. (Greenpointers)

America’s oldest mosque is just around the corner from the Lorimer stop on the L. (Bedford + Bowery)

The FIRST STEP Act, which is aimed at reforming the federal prison system and reducing recidivism, has roots in New York. US Representative Hakeem Jeffries, who represents parts of Queens and Brooklyn, crafted the bill. (Kings County Politics)

IT’s the most wonderful time of the year: Mulchfest! (6sqft)

If you think that you can’t fail a drug test because of poppy seed bagels, you might want to talk to officer Eleazar Paz. Paz was just reinstated to his post on Riker’s Island after being fired over his failed test in January. (NY Post)

Rising rents will claim Chelsea’s The Half King on January 2 after 18 years. (Eater)

Turns out the Queens podiatrist that helped President Bone Spurs dodge the Vietnam War draft did so for preferential treatment from his landlord: Trump’s daddy. (Gothamist)

A tribute to Larry Eisenberg, The New York Times‘ most prolific commenter (whose 13,000 comments were mostly in limerick form), who died on Tuesday at 99-years-old. (NY Times)

Eight minutes of NYC in the 1920’s. (Viewing NYC)

The home of the $18 coffee has closed. Yes, it was in Brooklyn, how did you know? (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

New York is the 15th state to establish a bill of rights for sexual assault survivors. New protections include the right to consult with a victim assistance organization during physical exams and interviews, examinations, preventive HIV treatment and other services at no cost, among others. (amNY)

The federal immigration courts in the city have been thrown into chaos due to the federal shutdown. The Javitz Building’s immigration court, which has a backlog of 105,000 cases, is closed while the Varick Street court remains open. (Gothamist)

The city’s minimum wage increases on December 31. For employers with 11 or more employees, $15 is the new minimum wage. Companies with less than 11 employees will have a $13.50 minimum wage. (amNY)

82% of shots fired by police miss their targets. Irene Ureña Perez was accidentally shot in the abdomen by one of the 27 shots fired plainclothes NYPD officer Juan Gomez while in pursuit of a suspect in early December. Perez is still recovering, has endured multiple surgeries and is suing the city for $10 million. (Gothamist)

Two of the men who were caught on video allegedly assaulted an NYPD officer on a subway platform in Chinatown have been arrested. (NY Post)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s 2018 transit wishlist. (Streetsblog)

As Long Island City girds itself for the delivery of Amazon’s tech bros, prices on prime real estate are going up. (NY Times)

The top restaurant standbys of 2018. (Eater)

30 New Year’s Eve events $35 and under. (the skint)

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