The Briefly for February 26-27, 2021 – The “NYC Anarchy No More” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The breakfast burrito worth a wait in the cold, sexual harassment claims against Governor Cuomo, Jojo Siwa plays MSG first, and more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 42˚
Possible light rain overnight.
This weekend – Low: 40˚ High: 48˚

• Turns out the Maluma concert in October isn’t MSG’s first show of the year. JoJo Siwa will play MSG on July 30. MSG will have a 10% capacity and everyone will need proof of a negative PCR test within 72 hours, not a rapid test. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

7 queer-friendly barbershops in Brooklyn. (Nick Gallagher for Brooklyn Magazine)

We’re no longer anarchists in the eyes of the federal government. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Former NYPD officer Thomas Webster was turned himself in on charges that he assaulted a Washington police officer during the January 6 insurrection. (Jonah E. Bromwich for NY Times)

The anti-Nicole Malliotakis PAC raised more than $20,000 in three weeks to help push out the freshman Republican congressmember. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

• Malliotakis says she will vote against the Covid-19 stimulus package, citing unspent money from the last relief bill. (Faraz Toor and AP for NY1)

NYC Beer Week will be virtual this year from February 28 – March 7. (Brew York)

• Moynihan Train Hall has a new photo installation, Penn Station’s Half Century, with photos form the original Penn Station from 1910 to 1963. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

• Turns out Century 21 isn’t dead. Without specifics, they announced a relaunch for later this year. (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

Tracing the travels of the Frito Pie from the invention from Teresa Hernandez in New Mexico in the 1960s to New York City. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

• Video: Defunctland covers Coney Island’s history. (Defunctland)

• The MTA is trying to keep the pandemic-level of service on the C and F trains moving forward, Transport Workers Union Local 100 is fighting against them. (Jose Martinez for The City)

• The hottest slice of pizza right now is the pizza made from Gabriele Lamonaca’s kitchen in Harlem. How can you get some in your mouth? Bartering! (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

• A survey shows that after restaurants implemented the city’s optional Covid-19 surcharge, restaurant workers tips declined. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

North Brooklyn gay bars to support during the pandemic. (Billy McEntee for Greenpointers)

Cy Vance has eight years of Donald Trump’s tax returns. (Jonah E. Bromwich for NY Times)

A new variant of the Covid-19 virus is spreading in New York. Say hello to B.1.526, which is different fro the UK and South African variants. (Apoorva Mandavilli for NY Times)

• Dr Howard Zucker, Commissioner of Health for New York State, defended the use of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin in state-run nursing homes early in the pandemic. (Dean Russell for The City)

Lindsey Boylan’s post about her experiences of abuse with Governor Cuomo. (Lindsey Boylan)

• Mayor de Blasio is calling for an independent investigation into the accusations of sexual harassment against Governor Cuomo. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Peter Luger filled its main dining room with wax figures from Madame Tussauds. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

A definitive ranking of celebrity wax figures at Peter Luger. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

NYPD Chief Terence Monahan is retiring and taking a new role as senior adviser for public safety under newly-named “recovery czar” Lorraine Grillo. Monahan has been partially blamed for the NYPD’s response to the George Floyd protests over last summer. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Lincoln Center will be opening ten new outdoor performance and rehearsal spaces on April 7, part of their Restart Stages initiative. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

• Since its recovery, the wreckage of TWA flight 800 has been in a warehouse in Virginia, used for training plane crash investigators. It’s scheduled for destruction later this year. (Michael Gold for NY Times)

• Mayoral candidate and City Comptroller Stringer released out a detailed 27-point compendium of progressive housing goals called “Housing is a Right, Not a Privilege,” rebutting Mayor de Blasio’s approach. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

• Podcast: Maya Wiley discusses her run for mayor. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

The Harlem Chocolate Factory’s Golden Brownstone chocolate bars, inspired by Harlem’s brownstones, landed on Oprah’s favorite things list. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The Queens Drive-In will return on March 5 with a free screening of Coming 2 America. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

9 Brooklyn restaurants with great patios for outdoor dining. (Andrew Cotto for Brooklyn Magazine)

• Waiting in line for trendy food is back and Ryan Sutton says the line for a breakfast burrito at Ursula in Crown Heights is worth the wait, even in the winter. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 21-22, 2021 – The “Take the Tone Down” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The NYPD loses another lawsuit over misconduct records, the Empire Station Complex plans, Brooklyn gets crabs, and more

Today – Low: 30˚ High: 34˚
Clear throughout the day.

• After a group of trans leaders called on Heritage of Pride (HOP) to hand over control of New York City’s Pride festivities to Black and Brown transgender individuals, a planned meeting between the two sides was cancelled — and a bitter controversy flared up. (Tat Bellamy-Walker for Gay City News)

Joe’s Pizza, Scarr’s Pizza and Uncle Mike’s Hometown Pizza are NYC’s favorite pizza places, according to Google Maps searches in 2020. (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

Indoor dining will increase in capacity on Friday, February 26 from 25% to 35%. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

• Now that he’s in deep shit with state and federal investigations into how his administration hid nursing home death numbers, the state’s legislature is about to strip him of his emergency powers, and public sentiment is turning against him, Governor Cuomo wants to “take the tone down.” (Christopher Robbins and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

92% of NYC restaurants were either unable to pay some or all of their rent in December. 46% were able to pay some, 45% couldn’t pay any. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Farewell Jing Fong, Chinatown’s legendary Chinatown dim sum banquet hall, open since 1972. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

“Ghost kitchens have been meticulously engineered to be infinitely adaptable and fantastically efficient. The Wall Street Journal loves them. But what they really are is a trend that manages, triumphantly, to strip away all joy from the act of eating. They are devoid of every feature that makes restaurants great, and they are not, despite what the many, many headlines say, the true future of the restaurant industry.”
-Rachel Sugar, Ghost Kitchens Will Always Be Dumb, for Grub Street

• Pete Wells goes a bit behind-the-scenes on what it’s been like being a restaurant critic during a pandemic that has shattered all of our norms about eating outside (and sometimes inside) the home. It’s hard to remain anonymous when your name is on your delivery order. (Pete Wells for NY Times)

• Podcast: They’re more than just the front door to the Teenage Mutant Nina Turtles’ home. Looking at the history of manhole covers. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

• Apartment Porn: Actress Sela Ward’s $5.8 million Soho loft, with 14-foot ceilings, exposed brick walls, a deep soacking tub, whatever a smart toilet is, a 300-bottle wine fridge, and more. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

• A majority of Democratic candidates running for Manhattan District Attorney are promising to end the agency’s use of software from Palantir, whose invasive surveillance software has been seen as unreliable and rife with racial justice and privacy issues. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

• Manhattan DA Cy Vance added Mark F. Pomerantz to the Donald Trump criminal investigation team. Pomerantz has a history of investigating and defending white-collar and organized crime cases. (William K. Rashbaum, Ben Protess and Jonah E. Bromwich for NY Times)

The NYPD’s secret misconduct records must be made public after a judge ruled against the Police Benevolent Association and other unions. This is the 50-a shielding law that’s been the focus of conversation for some time. The records have not been made public yet as Mayor de Blasio waits for clearance from the court about when the records can be released. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

A video shows an NYPD officer repeatedly punching a man as he’s held down on the ground at the South Ferry subway station during an arrest for allegedly smoking a cigarette on the platform on Tuesday. Is this what 500 more cops will look like in the subways? (David Cruz for Gothamist)

• How the NYPD’s Strategic Response Group, an anti-terror squad, became the city’s tool for cracking down on protests. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

• One day after signaling his plan not to enforce basic education standards within the community’s yeshivas Andrew Yang is the frontrunner for the ultra-Orthodox vote. Yang credits a month-long course on the Bible he took at a Westchester prep school as his reason for his stance. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A focus on the City Council showdown in Coney Island. (Rose Adams for Kinds County Politics)

• Corey Johnson got out of the mayor’s race, but now he’s thinking about running for comptroller. (Jeffery C. Mays and Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

• Podcast: Quanda Francis on her campaign for mayor. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

• Maya Wiley, the former MSNBC analyst and legal counsel to Mayor Bill de Blasio running for mayor, has the endorsement of Local 1199 of the Service Employees International Union, The National Health Care Workers’ Union, which also endorsed Mayor de Blasio before he was elected. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

• Congratulations Brooklyn, you have the lowest vaccination rates in the city. (Jake Samieske for Brooklyn Magazine)

Meet artist Devon Rodriguez, whose drawings of strangers on the subway is providing sparks of joy on his Instagram and TikTok accounts. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

KAWS: WHAT PARTY is coming to the Brooklyn Museum from February 26 – September 5. (Brooklyn Street Art)

RIP Arturo Di Modica, the sculptor of the Charging Bull statue. (NY1)

• Remember the Tribeca “bean” by Anish Kapoor, the creator of the Chicago bean, on Leonard St? It’s only partially built, half shiny bean, half plywood construction site. (Michael Young for New York YIMBY)

11 Black-owned wine shops across the city. (Hannah Albertine and Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

A Park Slope Food Co-Op member started a GoFundMe to raise $10,000 to sue the organization, alleging racial discrimination. (Erika Adams for Eater)

• Move over lobster, here come the crab boils. (Ellie Plass for Bklyner)

The city will not test rising kindergarteners for admission to gifted programs, the education department announced Wednesday. Instead, students will be evaluated by their pre-K teacher or sign up for an interview. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Black Seed Bagels is getting into pizza, but disappointingly there are no pizza bagels on the menu. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The top 10 places to find the best pastrami in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The state’s plan for the 20-million-square-foot Empire Station Complex surrounding Penn Station was adopted by the board of directors of Empire State Development. The plan calls for five buildings over 1,000 feet tall, up to 1,300 feet. For reference, the Empire State building’s roof is 1,250 feet tall. The project is expected to be completed by 2038. (Vanessa Londono for New York YIMBY)

Five snacks to try across the city. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for February 14-15, 2021 – The “It’s Not Good News for Governor Cuomo” Valentine’s Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Latest on the subway stabbings, restaurant and bad curfew raised to 11pm, Amazon sues Letitia James, and the best new bakeries in NYC

Today – Low: 30˚ High: 36˚
Overcast throughout the day.

What’s open and what’s closed on Presidents’ Day. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

• Governor Cuomo is facing allegations of a coverup of the Covid-19 death toll in nursing homes. Melissa DeRosa, a top aide, admitted that the state withheld data because they feared an investigation by the Trump Justice Department. In an unrelated accusation, Attorney General Letitia James accused the governor of undercounting Covid-19 deaths connected to nursing homes. As a result, the state legislature is considering ending the emergency powers given to Governor Cuomo earlier in the pandemic. (Jesse McKinley and Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

• In other Governor Cuomo-connected bad news, Cuomo is trying to distance himself from a state-run nursing home that was gave more than 60 residents a combination of antibiotics and hydroxchloroquine last spring. (Dean Russell for The City)

• Over 100 candidates and supporters are suing Governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio over the signature collecting requirement ahead of the June primaries, arguing that the practice is unconstitutional because it poses a direct threat to public health. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The barricades in front of Trump Tower have come down. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

• Did You Know: There are two landmarked trees in NYC. Weeping Beech & Magnolia Grandiflora. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

• The city’s Open Culture program that will begin issuing permits for socially distanced street performers on 100 specified streets. The city will also help venues, workers, and organizations who are applying for federal relief through Save Our Stages grants. The state has its own live performances in public places program called NY PopsUp, which seems to be competing with the city’s Open Culture program. NY PopsUp starts February 20, 10 days before the city’s program starts. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

• Starting tonight outdoor dining is being allowed until 11pm. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

• As restaurants are partially open for indoor dining and the Barclays Center will host its first basketball game with a crowd in nearly a year, there is no word on if or when Coney Island will be able to reopen. (Brooklyn Eagle)

• After four stabbings along the A line within 24 hours, the NYPD is sending 500 officers into the subway system. The stabbings, two of which were fatal, happened at the Fort-Washington-181st St, the Mott Ave and Beach 22nd Street, and the West 207th St and Broadway stations. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

• Detectives are questioning a person of interest in connection with the stabbings. (Robert Pozarycki for QNS)

• Advocates for homeless New Yorkers sued the MTA over a series of Covid-19 rules that the suit says unfairly target people who shelter in the city’s subways. (Andy Newman for NY Times)

1.7 million counterfeit N95 masks were seized from a Queens warehouse. The masks were fake 3M masks. If you have 3M masks, you can check that they are genuine using barcodes and lot numbers on their website. All N95 masks include approval numbers that can be checked on the CDC’s website. (Ron Lee for NY1)

A crane on top of a 31-story building in Greenpoint partially collapsed on Thursday afternoon. There were no reports of injuries or anything hitting the ground. Developers are blaming the collapse on a malfunction. The crane’s girlfriend said it happens to a lot of cranes. Oof, sorry, that was an awful joke. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

In praise of Red Hook’s The Record Shop. (Gene Bray for Red Hook Star-Revue)

• This is a weird one. Amazon is suing Attorney General Letitia James in order to prevent her office from bringing charges against Amazon after investigating Amazon’s workplace safety, claiming she does not have the right to investigate workplace safety during the Covid-19 pandemic. Does that seem like a pre-admission of guilt to anyone? (Karen Weise for NY Times)

How to celebrate Mardi Gras in NYC (it’s on Tuesday). (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Top ten secrets of the Morris-Jumel Mansion, one of Manhattan’s oldest buildings. (Untapped New York)

The Frick Collection has announced that it will open its temporary home at 945 Madison Ave on March 18. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

What is a City Comptroller and why should you care? (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

• Interview: Carlos Menchaca discusses his run for mayor. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

• “We Are: The Brooklyn Saints” tells the story of a boys’ youth football team in East New York and is available on Netflix now. (Brian Braiker for Brooklyn Magazine)

The best new bakeries in NYC. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!