The Briefly for March 27, 2020 – The “No One is Stopping You From Leaving” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The best to-go cocktails available, hospitals begin to share ventilators, the Brooklyn Navy Yard steps up, restaurants become wine shops, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 64˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 46˚ High: 56˚

Okay, real question. How do we do our laundry now? (Sanam Yar for NY Times)

Here’s what you can and can’t do in the city right now. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

When the governor announced that the state would be making 100,000 gallons of hand sanitizer a week using prison labor, we were a little short on details and we still are. The sanitizer is being bottled in state prisons by Corcraft, the public-facing brand name of the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision’s Division of Industries, but as the reporting has discovered, it’s unknown where it’s actually being produced. (Katie Way for VICE)

The summer is approaching, when the city’s wealthy abandon our streets and flee upstate and to the Hamptons. Despite calls for a vacation home travel ban, the governor has no plans to put one in place. (Erik Engquist for The Real Deal)

Here are the streets the city will close this weekend to give us some space. There is one closure in each borough. One. Instead of creating more space for us to stretch out in, the city has created one destination inside each borough, especially the six blocks of Park Ave in Midtown. I predict this pilot program will be hailed as a success because of this weekend’s rain and not because one street in each borough was closed. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

If you’ve got a bike gathering dust, donate it to someone who needs it. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Choice bike rides in each borough, even if the weather this weekend isn’t looking great for a leisurely ride. (Lillia Panych for Untapped New York)

It seems we can’t be trusted with basketball courts without breaking physical distancing guidelines, so the basketball hoops in 80 parks across the city have been removed. (Greenpointers)

For the third time this week a Trader Joe’s store, the Chelsea location, is closed due to multiple staffers testing positive for COVID-19. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The story of one couple who saw the ban on partners in the delivery room at NewYork-Presbyterian, left the city. (Catherine Pearson for HuffPost)

Revel quietly expanded its service area into Manhattan, above 65th Street, and doubled the area in Brooklyn and Queens. Healthcare workers can receive free rides by registering online. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Where to find a birthday cake in the age of the coronavirus. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Imagine you’re a college student and you’re given 24 hours to vacate your dorm room. Now Imagine the world went to shit while you were on Spring Break and you never went back to the college because all classes were held online. If you don’t live near the city, how do you vacate your dorm room? What if you’re a student who lives abroad but is studying in New York? What do you do with 24 hours to go home? (Dylan Campbell for Gothamist)

Some restaurants with expansive wine catalogs are pivoting during the pandemic and becoming impromptu wine shops, offering a selection of bottles that would otherwise be difficult to find. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

Hey drivers, don’t be idiots just because the roads are clear. Exactly what this city doesn’t need is more people in hospitals, like this five-vehicle accident on Ocean Parkway. (Julianna Cuba for Streetsblog)

Governors Ball is canceled. Refunds are available or you can transfer your ticket to next year. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Legal Aid filed suit against New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services Wednesday requesting the immediate release of 22 teens, ages 13 through 17, held on Family Court charges at detention facilities. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“I never thought I would write those words, but I do miss the tourists.” Is it crazy to miss the tourists on the Brooklyn Bridge or are we all yearning for the resemblance of normalcy? (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

The Freelancers Union is launching the Freelancers Relief Fund, a direct aid fund that will help independent workers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic so they can pay for their expenses like rent, utilities, and groceries. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Advice: What you can do if you can’t pay your mortgage or rent due to the pandemic. (Cate Corcoran for Brownstoner)

Where to get sushi delivery and takeout, mostly in Manhattan. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Amateur Night at the Apollo is going all digital. (Devi Lockwood for NY Times)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard has sprung into action during previous world wars and crises, and this is no different. Bednark, a manufacturing company, is churning out thousands of face shields a day. Kings County Distillery and perfume company DS. & Gurga are making sanitizer and tailor Kingsbridge is making face masks. They didn’t call it “The Can-Do Shipyard” for nothing. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Photo: You approach a roll of pristine toilet paper on the street. What do you do? (EV Grieve)

The Four Seasons Hotel in New York City will be providing health care workers responding to the coronavirus pandemic with free lodging. (Jenna Amatulli for HuffPost)

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital has begun sharing ventilators between two patients because “the other option is death.” (Brian M. Rosenthal, Jennifer Pinkowski and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

RIP Fred “Curly” Neal, one of the Harlem Globetrotters’ biggest stars. (Marc Stein for NY Times)

The Tenement Museum is struggling to stay afloat, as the COVID-19 shutdown eliminated foot traffic and steady funding. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

The best to-go cocktails available right now at bars and restaurants in NYC. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The Briefly for August 16, 2019 – The “Everyone is Moving Slower Than We Used To” Edition

This weekend’s subway changes, a look at “environmental review,” real estate brokers are finding ways around rent reforms, de Blasio eats a corn dog and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend’s subways are seriously taking a break from normal service with disruptions on the 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, D, F, M, N, and the Staten Island Railway. (Subway Weekender)

What is “Environmental Review” and why NIMBY lawsuits cite it as a reason to kill projects like the Central Park West bike lane or 14 St busway. (Streetsblog)

A Bronx man will serve a three-to-nine-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to second-degree manslaughter after fleeing the scene of a drunken car crash that killed Jose Cardoso. (Brooklyn Paper)

In the last 10 years, the average speed of a taxi below 60th St has gone from 9mph to 7mph, traffic speeds in midtown are down to 4.9 mph, subway and bus ridership declined, and it’s faster to get anywhere in midtown on a bike. Wherever we’re all going, we’re all getting there slower than ever, unless we’re on a bike. (Gothamist)

There will not be any charges against the driver who killed Aurilla Lawrence with a truck in a hit-and-run crash on February 28. It appears that if a driver claims they didn’t know they hit anyone, the NYPD won’t bring charges. (Streetsblog)

I believe we can all agree gentrification is inevitable, with both positive and negative outcomes,” says a man who is developing “co-living” real estate (read: dorm living for adults) in Bushwick who refuses to call himself a real estate developer. (NY Times)

Only for the brave: You can canoe the Gowanus Canal. (Brooklyn Based)

A guide to the city’s rental-finding websites. (Curbed)

Tribeca, NoLita, and Soho have remained the most expensive neighborhoods to live in for years, but Cobble Hill, Red Hook, and Grammercy Park are climbing that list quickly. (StreetEasy)

Everyone loves a list of hot spots unless it means a literal list of America’s hot spots where temperatures are rising dangerously fast and are past the point of “catastrophic effects.” (Patch)

Revel has added classes in August and September for people who feel trepidation about jumping on an electric moped for the first time. (Streetsblog)

Lobster rolls can be pretty expensive at times, but at $100, the roll at BK Lobster is “infused” with 24K gold. Thirsty for more gold? You can wash it down with wine with 23K gold flakes. (Eater)

Manero’s opens this weekend, the only slice shop on Mulberry St in Little Italy. If the name is familiar, it’s because it’s named for Tony Manero, John Travolta’s character in Saturday Night Fever and even features a double-decker slice in honor of the movie’s opening scene. (Gothamist)

State Attorney General Letitia James’s office has the Sackler Family, the seeming creators of America’s opioid crisis and founders and owners of Perdue Pharma, in its sights. The AG is investigating if the owners hid billions of dollars in an effort to hide profits. (NY Times)

There’s a connection between the rise of Uber and the popularity of late-night and overnight badminton. (Gothamist)

37 chefs give their neighborhood gems. (Grub Street)

Before the Vanderbilts were the Vanderbilts, there was Cornelius Vanderbilt, the man who built the family’s fortunes. In 1794 he was born 209 Port Richmond Ave. You won’t find a monument to the man on that spot, you’ll find No. 1 Chinese Takeout. (Untapped Cities)

Where to eat after going for a run in Williamsburg, but also after you’ve had a shower and changed your clothes. (The Infatuation)

If you want to watch the mayor eat a corn dog, there is a video of his iconic corn dog-eating moment at the Iowa State Fair that is as cringe as it gets. (@marcusdipaola)

There’s a place in this world for masochism, there really is,” was the mayor’s answer on The Daily Show for if he’s just a sucker for punishment by being the city’s mayor and a presidential candidate. (Gothamist)

An Upper East Side plastic surgeon was arrested in Westchester this week when police found a car full of loaded assault rifles and ballistic armor in the course of responding to a domestic incident. (Gothamist)

Continuing the summer of hate, hundreds of anti-semitic flyers were scattered around the Halsey stop on the L on Wednesday. (QNS)

Say hello to a $10 cup of coffee that might be worth it. (Grub Street)

A list of how companies connected to Stephen Ross have attempted to distance themselves from the man who raised $12 million for President Trump during a single meal last Friday. (6sqft)

Real estate brokers are already finding loopholes around some of the state’s new rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

The city removed a round if applications from the middle and high school admissions process this week. This change doesn’t touch the mayor’s promise to get rid of the SHSAT. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Are you one of the people among the city’s 82,473 DNA profiles in its genetic database? (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo is looking to expand consequences for mass shooters that are motivated by hate. His proposal would classify killings on the basis of race, religion, creed, or sexual orientation as terrorism and punishable by life in prison without parole. (Gothamist)

16 superior breakfast sandwiches. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 12, 2019 – The “LaGuardia Airport: A Hellhole of Hellholes” Edition

Zombie homes, free subways and buses on holidays, the ultra-rich New Yorkers funding Trump’s campaign, the Islanders are leaving Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are extensive, double-check the trains before staying out late. (Subway Weekender)

The second phase of the Hudson Yards construction involves something pretty common to NYC: delays from the MTA. (6sqft)

A history, explanation, and timeline of the LaGuardia construction. (amNY)

Saying LaGuardia Airport sucks in 2019 is underselling the sheer nightmare that is trying to escape the city from an airport where 90% of people are using private transportation to get to. Thursday’s disaster scenario of people walking on the highways and ramps to catch their flights was blamed on it being of the 45 peak travel days for the summer. Between the MTA’s stellar track record for buses, the Port Authority’s control of the airport, the DOT’s control of the roads and individual airlines’ construction on terminals, this is a problem that will persist for years.

Where’s the governor on all of this? He’s called this whole mess “unavoidable,” while also taking no specific action to make traveling to the airport any less hellish. If you’re traveling on any of the 19 “peak” days in August, the Port Authority suggests leaving multiple hours earlier to account for the travel disaster waiting for you. (Gothamist)

The “zombie homes” in Sheepshead bay are becoming a real problem for the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York state has a case against ExxonMobil for misleading its shareholders by lying about knowledge of climate change as early as 1977, and now the state has caught ExxonMobil attempting to intimidate the witnesses. Opening statements are scheduled for October 23. (Inside Climate News)

If you’re the type of person who hates having money and loves martinis, maybe The Algonquin Hotel’s $10,000 martini is for you, which comes with a diamond ring. (Untapped Cities)

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade replaced animals from the Central Park Zoo with balloons in 1927. The company turned to Greenwich Villager Tony Sarg to create the first iconic balloons for the parade. (GVSHP)

Incomplete data and sporadic surveys make measuring storefront vacancies difficult, but a study from the Department of City Planning shows the problem doesn’t exist everywhere in the city. Jackson Heights has the lowest vacancy rate of the areas surveyed at 5.1% compared to Canal Street, which is at 25.9%. (Curbed)

The history of how a natural gas pipeline turned into a 30-mile offshore windfarm. (The Indypendent)

This week’s forced restaurant closures do not disappoint with two different places being closed by the Department of Health, both scoring over 100 violation points in the process. (Patch)

The worry over rentable Revel scooters in Brooklyn and Queens is just that, worry. The company’s mission enjoys rare support from both the Department of Transportation’s Polly Trottenberg and Transportation Alternatives, and if they proved to be dangerous, you’d be reading about the danger they pose to pedestrians in The Briefly on a regular basis. (NY Times)

These are the city’s top high schools. (Patch)

The city is transforming two East Harlem lots into all below-market-rate apartments with 30% set aside for the homeless as part of the East Harlem Housing Plan. (Curbed)

Does no one ride the subways on major holidays because the MTA cuts service or does the MTA cut service because no one rides the subways on holidays? City Councilmember Justin Brannan will propose a non-binding resolution to request the MTA offer free subway and bus service during New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day in a similar fashion to how parking meters are suspended on those days. The MTA is, of course, against anything that would promote more people to take the train or buses. (6sqft)

85% of people stopped for mass transit fare evasion are black or Latinx, which echoes the unmistakable racist enforcement of stop and frisk. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Islanders are getting a permanent home in Belmont Park with a 19,000 seat arena for the team is dead last when it comes to attendance figures for the last two seasons. (QNS)

A list of the 1% of the 1% of New York City that is fueling Trump’s reelection campaign. Of course, the city’s worst musician and Knicks owner James Dolan is on the list. (Gothamist)

The condo board of 25 Central Park West is asking neighbor buildings for money to continue to fight their lawsuit against a protected bike lane that could have saved the life of cyclist Madison Lyden. (Streetsblog)

Mike Chen is testing the six top burgers in the city, which will come out ahead? (Viewing NYC)

Already tired of the 2020 primary race among Democrats? Here is a list of possible 2021 hopefuls for NYC mayor. (amNY)

As Sunset Park becomes more popular thanks to a gentrifying neighborhood and Industry City, Third Avenue’s dangers become more pronounced. The death of Em Samolewicz is one of eight fatalities and 2,000 injuries on Third Ave since 2011. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A judge issued a stay and once again blocked the 14th St busway from becoming a reality. Every single headline about this story has used some variation of the phrase “slams brakes on” like it was legally mandated. (Downtown Express)

29% of the 15,500 structural components at subway stations were found to be worn or damaged, and that number is up since 2012. Comforting, right? (amNY)

Anti-ICE protestors shut down the West Side Highway at 26th St on Saturday for an hour. (Splinter)

Were you among the 10,253 people treated by the FDNY between 2011 and 2018 whose personal information, including social security number, was accidentally left on a hard drive and misplaced? (amNY)

The New York Philharmonic’s Free Fridays are returning, giving away tickets to people between 13 and 26 with an online reservation system. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jeffrey Epstein is dead of an apparent suicide, but the investigation into his crimes is not. The FBI and prosecutors will turn their attention to his accomplices. (NY Times)

The city’s 19th cyclist was killed by a teenage driver on Sunday in Midwood. (Brooklyn Paper)

City Hall Park is now adorned by “Estructuras Monumentales“, works by 104-year-old local artist Carmen Herrera and will be on display through November 8. (Downtown Express)

A deep look into Corey Johnson’s plans to kill the city’s car culture. (Gotham Gazette)

35 solid happy hours. (Eater)