The Briefly for May 11, 2020 – The “A Huge Amount of Restraint by the NYPD” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Governor Cuomo did not extend NY PAUSE past May 15, the Rent Guidelines Board explained, the NYC dessert delivery guide, Spike Lee’s NYC love letter, & more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 60˚
Possible light rain in the morning.

NY is not extending PAUSE through June 6. Early reporting stated that incorrectly. What happened over the weekend is Governor Cuomo extending New York’s state of emergency. Regions of the state that meet the state’s criteria will be opening, but in the city we can all but guarantee that we’re going last. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Apartment Porn: An Upper East Side Townhouse with an indoor pool, a wild spiral staircase, and a dining room larger than most apartments. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Details on the deal that resulted in New York paying some schmuck $86 million for ventilators that never materialized. Maybe New York is the schmuck in this deal. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Thomas Kaplan for NY Times)

Black and brown New Yorkers received more than 80 percent of social distancing summons handed out by the NYPD. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“I was on the floor, I thought I was going to die.” A first-hand account from Adegoke Atunbi of being arrested by the NYPD’s 75th precinct, the most-sued precinct in NYC. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

There’s been a huge amount of restraint by the NYPD” -Mayor de Blasio, on the very obvious bias in policing of social distancing observed anecdotally but also in numbers released by the NYPD. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

After a week of violent arrests of minority New Yorkers and criticism of how differently the NYPD is handling overcrowding in parks, the mayor decided to limit the number of people allowed Hudson River and Domino Park. That fixes everything, right? (NY1)

Take a look at the latest filings for Pacific Park, the set of apartment buildings planned for the Atlantic Yards. (Norman Odler for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Edible Queens will close at the end of the month, after a three-year run. Each Edible publication is independently owned. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Allowing bars and restaurants to sell cocktails to go has been a lifeline to some bars, but to the bars in the city whose appeal is the community and not the cocktails, they continue to struggle. The damage of the ongoing closure is putting the city’s remaining lesbian bars in danger. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

While restaurants are fighting to survive, Grubhub is reporting record revenue. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Whenever the city’s restaurants are allowed to open back up, expect reduced capacity and new social distancing rules to be put in place. If you thought going back to restaurants and bars was going to be the “all clear” signal, we’ll still have a long road ahead. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The first death of a child due to the syndrome linked to Covid-19 was reported at the end of last week. On Friday, there were 73 children in the state hospitalized because of the syndrome. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

NYC’s reaction to JetBlue’s low-altitude flyover was a general “could you please not?” (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Gray’s Papaya on the Upper West Side has reopened. It’s not 24 hours (yet), but it’s nice to have an NYC institution back. (Carol Tannenhauser for West Side Rag)

Revel has continued its expansion during the pandemic, reaching into the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The Rent Guidelines Board (RGB) will vote on June 17 on adjustments for the city’s 1 million rent-stabilized apartments for the coming year. Your questions from “What is the RGB?” to “When does their decision go into effect” explained. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Tae Kyong Kim and Jung Soo Lee have been arrested and charged with price gouging for selling face masks for $45 a pack at Whitestone grocery store Raspberry Farm. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Welcome to 2020, where heroin is branded “Coronavirus.” Over a million dollars of Coronavirus heroin and fentanyl was seized in a University Heights bust. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Spike Lee’s short film New York New York is “A Love Letter To It’s People. Plain And Simple”. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Governor Andrew Cuomo extended the deadline for filing new childhood sexual abuse claims under New York’s Child Victims Act from August 14, 2020, to January 14, 2021. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

This weekend my wife found a place on Franklin Ave in Crown Heights that put itself online as an ice cream delivery store. It’s a corner store, but they found their angle to get themselves online. They’re not the only ones, in another example of finding your angle to get online, Annie’s Blue Ribbon General Store in Park Slope has 1,000 piece puzzles for those of you clamoring for new puzzles. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Ben Benson, whose career took him from helping create TGI Friday’s, to creating Smith and Woolensky, to eventually creating his own steakhouse, Ben Benson’s. (Kim Severson for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio put NYC Health + Hospitals in charge of the city’s Covid-19 testing and tracing programs instead of the Department of Mental Health and Mental Hygiene, a decision universally disliked by the City Council, City Comptroller Scott Stringer, and health officials. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

This week’s streaming performances from the Metropolitan Opera. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

Over the weekend, as temperatures dropped into the 30s, the MTA still closed the subways for disinfecting, and provided “bus shelters” for the homeless New Yorkers that were removed from the trains overnight. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Op-ed: Acting New York City Transit president Sarah Feinberg in her own words on the subway shutdown. (Sarah Feinberg for amNewYork Metro)

Video: In defense of liking New York. (Jeremiah Moss for Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

Who the hell thought it was a good idea for the Lower East Side’s open streets to only be open from 8am to noon? Doesn’t anyone know it’s a pandemic? Time has no meaning anymore! We can sleep until whenever we want! (Bowery Boogie)

What do you miss about New York? How about everything. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

The dessert delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for March 27, 2020 – The “No One is Stopping You From Leaving” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The best to-go cocktails available, hospitals begin to share ventilators, the Brooklyn Navy Yard steps up, restaurants become wine shops, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 64˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 46˚ High: 56˚

Okay, real question. How do we do our laundry now? (Sanam Yar for NY Times)

Here’s what you can and can’t do in the city right now. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

When the governor announced that the state would be making 100,000 gallons of hand sanitizer a week using prison labor, we were a little short on details and we still are. The sanitizer is being bottled in state prisons by Corcraft, the public-facing brand name of the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision’s Division of Industries, but as the reporting has discovered, it’s unknown where it’s actually being produced. (Katie Way for VICE)

The summer is approaching, when the city’s wealthy abandon our streets and flee upstate and to the Hamptons. Despite calls for a vacation home travel ban, the governor has no plans to put one in place. (Erik Engquist for The Real Deal)

Here are the streets the city will close this weekend to give us some space. There is one closure in each borough. One. Instead of creating more space for us to stretch out in, the city has created one destination inside each borough, especially the six blocks of Park Ave in Midtown. I predict this pilot program will be hailed as a success because of this weekend’s rain and not because one street in each borough was closed. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

If you’ve got a bike gathering dust, donate it to someone who needs it. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Choice bike rides in each borough, even if the weather this weekend isn’t looking great for a leisurely ride. (Lillia Panych for Untapped New York)

It seems we can’t be trusted with basketball courts without breaking physical distancing guidelines, so the basketball hoops in 80 parks across the city have been removed. (Greenpointers)

For the third time this week a Trader Joe’s store, the Chelsea location, is closed due to multiple staffers testing positive for COVID-19. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The story of one couple who saw the ban on partners in the delivery room at NewYork-Presbyterian, left the city. (Catherine Pearson for HuffPost)

Revel quietly expanded its service area into Manhattan, above 65th Street, and doubled the area in Brooklyn and Queens. Healthcare workers can receive free rides by registering online. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Where to find a birthday cake in the age of the coronavirus. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Imagine you’re a college student and you’re given 24 hours to vacate your dorm room. Now Imagine the world went to shit while you were on Spring Break and you never went back to the college because all classes were held online. If you don’t live near the city, how do you vacate your dorm room? What if you’re a student who lives abroad but is studying in New York? What do you do with 24 hours to go home? (Dylan Campbell for Gothamist)

Some restaurants with expansive wine catalogs are pivoting during the pandemic and becoming impromptu wine shops, offering a selection of bottles that would otherwise be difficult to find. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

Hey drivers, don’t be idiots just because the roads are clear. Exactly what this city doesn’t need is more people in hospitals, like this five-vehicle accident on Ocean Parkway. (Julianna Cuba for Streetsblog)

Governors Ball is canceled. Refunds are available or you can transfer your ticket to next year. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Legal Aid filed suit against New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services Wednesday requesting the immediate release of 22 teens, ages 13 through 17, held on Family Court charges at detention facilities. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“I never thought I would write those words, but I do miss the tourists.” Is it crazy to miss the tourists on the Brooklyn Bridge or are we all yearning for the resemblance of normalcy? (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

The Freelancers Union is launching the Freelancers Relief Fund, a direct aid fund that will help independent workers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic so they can pay for their expenses like rent, utilities, and groceries. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Advice: What you can do if you can’t pay your mortgage or rent due to the pandemic. (Cate Corcoran for Brownstoner)

Where to get sushi delivery and takeout, mostly in Manhattan. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Amateur Night at the Apollo is going all digital. (Devi Lockwood for NY Times)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard has sprung into action during previous world wars and crises, and this is no different. Bednark, a manufacturing company, is churning out thousands of face shields a day. Kings County Distillery and perfume company DS. & Gurga are making sanitizer and tailor Kingsbridge is making face masks. They didn’t call it “The Can-Do Shipyard” for nothing. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Photo: You approach a roll of pristine toilet paper on the street. What do you do? (EV Grieve)

The Four Seasons Hotel in New York City will be providing health care workers responding to the coronavirus pandemic with free lodging. (Jenna Amatulli for HuffPost)

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital has begun sharing ventilators between two patients because “the other option is death.” (Brian M. Rosenthal, Jennifer Pinkowski and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

RIP Fred “Curly” Neal, one of the Harlem Globetrotters’ biggest stars. (Marc Stein for NY Times)

The Tenement Museum is struggling to stay afloat, as the COVID-19 shutdown eliminated foot traffic and steady funding. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

The best to-go cocktails available right now at bars and restaurants in NYC. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The Briefly for August 16, 2019 – The “Everyone is Moving Slower Than We Used To” Edition

This weekend’s subway changes, a look at “environmental review,” real estate brokers are finding ways around rent reforms, de Blasio eats a corn dog and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend’s subways are seriously taking a break from normal service with disruptions on the 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, D, F, M, N, and the Staten Island Railway. (Subway Weekender)

What is “Environmental Review” and why NIMBY lawsuits cite it as a reason to kill projects like the Central Park West bike lane or 14 St busway. (Streetsblog)

A Bronx man will serve a three-to-nine-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to second-degree manslaughter after fleeing the scene of a drunken car crash that killed Jose Cardoso. (Brooklyn Paper)

In the last 10 years, the average speed of a taxi below 60th St has gone from 9mph to 7mph, traffic speeds in midtown are down to 4.9 mph, subway and bus ridership declined, and it’s faster to get anywhere in midtown on a bike. Wherever we’re all going, we’re all getting there slower than ever, unless we’re on a bike. (Gothamist)

There will not be any charges against the driver who killed Aurilla Lawrence with a truck in a hit-and-run crash on February 28. It appears that if a driver claims they didn’t know they hit anyone, the NYPD won’t bring charges. (Streetsblog)

I believe we can all agree gentrification is inevitable, with both positive and negative outcomes,” says a man who is developing “co-living” real estate (read: dorm living for adults) in Bushwick who refuses to call himself a real estate developer. (NY Times)

Only for the brave: You can canoe the Gowanus Canal. (Brooklyn Based)

A guide to the city’s rental-finding websites. (Curbed)

Tribeca, NoLita, and Soho have remained the most expensive neighborhoods to live in for years, but Cobble Hill, Red Hook, and Grammercy Park are climbing that list quickly. (StreetEasy)

Everyone loves a list of hot spots unless it means a literal list of America’s hot spots where temperatures are rising dangerously fast and are past the point of “catastrophic effects.” (Patch)

Revel has added classes in August and September for people who feel trepidation about jumping on an electric moped for the first time. (Streetsblog)

Lobster rolls can be pretty expensive at times, but at $100, the roll at BK Lobster is “infused” with 24K gold. Thirsty for more gold? You can wash it down with wine with 23K gold flakes. (Eater)

Manero’s opens this weekend, the only slice shop on Mulberry St in Little Italy. If the name is familiar, it’s because it’s named for Tony Manero, John Travolta’s character in Saturday Night Fever and even features a double-decker slice in honor of the movie’s opening scene. (Gothamist)

State Attorney General Letitia James’s office has the Sackler Family, the seeming creators of America’s opioid crisis and founders and owners of Perdue Pharma, in its sights. The AG is investigating if the owners hid billions of dollars in an effort to hide profits. (NY Times)

There’s a connection between the rise of Uber and the popularity of late-night and overnight badminton. (Gothamist)

37 chefs give their neighborhood gems. (Grub Street)

Before the Vanderbilts were the Vanderbilts, there was Cornelius Vanderbilt, the man who built the family’s fortunes. In 1794 he was born 209 Port Richmond Ave. You won’t find a monument to the man on that spot, you’ll find No. 1 Chinese Takeout. (Untapped Cities)

Where to eat after going for a run in Williamsburg, but also after you’ve had a shower and changed your clothes. (The Infatuation)

If you want to watch the mayor eat a corn dog, there is a video of his iconic corn dog-eating moment at the Iowa State Fair that is as cringe as it gets. (@marcusdipaola)

There’s a place in this world for masochism, there really is,” was the mayor’s answer on The Daily Show for if he’s just a sucker for punishment by being the city’s mayor and a presidential candidate. (Gothamist)

An Upper East Side plastic surgeon was arrested in Westchester this week when police found a car full of loaded assault rifles and ballistic armor in the course of responding to a domestic incident. (Gothamist)

Continuing the summer of hate, hundreds of anti-semitic flyers were scattered around the Halsey stop on the L on Wednesday. (QNS)

Say hello to a $10 cup of coffee that might be worth it. (Grub Street)

A list of how companies connected to Stephen Ross have attempted to distance themselves from the man who raised $12 million for President Trump during a single meal last Friday. (6sqft)

Real estate brokers are already finding loopholes around some of the state’s new rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

The city removed a round if applications from the middle and high school admissions process this week. This change doesn’t touch the mayor’s promise to get rid of the SHSAT. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Are you one of the people among the city’s 82,473 DNA profiles in its genetic database? (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo is looking to expand consequences for mass shooters that are motivated by hate. His proposal would classify killings on the basis of race, religion, creed, or sexual orientation as terrorism and punishable by life in prison without parole. (Gothamist)

16 superior breakfast sandwiches. (Eater)