The Briefly for March 3, 2020 – The “Kill it! Kill It All With Bleach!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Inside a Bushwick arts collective, Gale Brewer accidentally violates the Civil Rights Act of 1968, the tale of two of “the city’s best” burgers, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 58˚
Light rain starting in the afternoon.

A look inside Bohemian Grove, part venue, part apartment building full of artists and performers that are all paying under $1,000 rent and that is, yes, in Bushwick. (Kim Kelsey for NY Times)

Video: A POV experience going to the top of One World Observatory. (ActionKid)

An argument that restaurant letter grades, health inspections, and fines work against the public interest and instead are a great source of revenue for the city. (Demian Repucci for Grub Street)

Governor Cuomo directed NY health insurers to waive cost sharing associated with testing for coronavirus, including emergency room, urgent care and office visits. (@NYGovCuomo)

KILL IT WITH BLEACH. That the’s MTA’s plan to fight the spread of coronavirus on our buses, trains, and schools. New York will never be so clean again. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The numbers of New Yorkers infected with coronavirus will go up, but it does not mean that the virus is spreading. It means we’re identifying the people who have it already. In the meantime, cough and sneeze into your elbow, wash your hands with soap, and please stop touching your face. Are you doing it right now? Stop it. (Jesse McKinley and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

Top 5 pizza shops in the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Whoops. Gale Brewer’s stated argument against the rezoning for Lenox Terrace technically goes against the 1968 Civil Rights Act. Brewer specifically says the rezoning should be stopped to prevent a decrease in the area’s Black population. Attempts to preserve racial composition of a neighborhood goes against the act, even if it the original intention was to criminalize keeping white neighborhoods white. The argument made here lays it on a bit thick, but it highlights why our politicians need to be careful when laying out their arguments. (Nikolai Fedak for New York YIMBY)

Rendering: The Waldorf Astoria’s residents-only pool, 6,000 square feet with 19-foot ceilings and a retractible roof. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The Democratic Socialists of America have allies in City Councilmember Costa Costantinides, State Senator Michael Gianaris, and Assemblymembers Ron Kim and Brian Barnwell in replacing Con Ed with publicly owned power. (Max Parrott for QNS)

Amtrak has a new chief executive in William J. Flynn, the third in the last three years. Good luck. ((Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

RIP Joe Coulombe, Trader Joe. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

A moderate Democrat drops out of the race in hopes that it ives another moderate enough of the vote to beat the Democratic Socialist at the top of the ticket. No, this isn’t about Mayor Pete or Amy dropping out of the race in hopes of stopping Bernie, this is Fernando Cabrera dropping out of the race for 14th Congressional District against Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez in hopes that Michelle Caruso-Cabrera has a better chance. (David Cruz for Norwood News)

Residents in East New York are looking to Albany to declare a cease-and-desist zone for house flippers after reporting multiple phone calls and door knocks a day from people attempting to buy their homes unsolicited. (Allison Dikanovic for The City)

A Q&A with the new Interim President of New York City Transit, where Feinberg offers no good answer as to why she supports hiring 500 additional cops with no measure of success on the job would look like for them and at the same time cutting 700 operational positions to save money. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Free rent and getting paid to explore downtown Manhattan. Welcome to the Explorer-in Chief job. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Without visible enforcement, the rules get relaxed. That’s what’s happening in Sunset Park as truck drivers are deviating from the city’s legal through streets and getting stuck in attempts to make impossible turns. The NYPD issued 16 tickets for commercial vehicles on residential streets in all of Brooklyn in January. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Could this be the year the city takes decisive action to protect pedestrians against drivers? State Sen. Andrew Gounardes is sponsoring a package of bills at the state level aimed at making the city’s streets safer. You’d think the City Council would be leading the way on this, but I’m glad to see that someone is attempting to take action. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A carriage horse was euthanized shortly after she collapsed in Central Park on Saturday. The incident that lead to the horse’s death was captured on video. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio as yet to make good on his campaign promise from 2013, where he said he would ban horse carriages from Central Park on day one. A promise which earned him the support of animal rights activists over Christine Quinn in the Democratic primary. (Elizabeth Titus for Politico)

The Sergeants Benevolent Association and Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, two loudmouth organizations when it comes to bail reform, are suspiciously quiet when it comes to the case of narcotics officer Stephen Abreu, who was charged with attempted murder, criminal possession of a weapon and other charges. Awaiting a felony murder charge, he was released without bail. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Kudos to Streetsblog, who heard about the stupid campaign in Staten Island to tie yellow ribbons around phone poles to warn drivers of speed cameras, and decided to go to Staten Island to tie as many ribbons around as many poles as they could find in protest. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Mayor de Blasio ran for president and his campaign died. He endorsed Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden is seeing a resurgence. Now he’s taking his kiss of death home to Chirlane McCray in hopes that he can help make his wife the next Brooklyn borough president. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

Scarr’s Pizza is moving, but only down the street to a larger location on Orchard St. Get your slices now so you can talk down to people waiting on line for pizza at the new location. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Sometimes you can’t pass up a sign (or two in this case) declaring the best burger in New York City. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

10 new public art installations not to miss in March. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Thank you to reader Dylan for sending in today’s featured photo from outside the Brooklyn Museum of this Leon Karssen sticker.

The Briefly for January 24, 2020 – The Weekend “Train Daddy Andy Byford Quit His Job” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: A bed bug shuts down a subway station, e-bike legalization is on the horizon, cashless stores are a thing of the past, the best hot chocolate and more

Today – Low: 37˚ High: 49˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 36˚ High: 51˚

A headline that cuts right to the bone: Millennials Love Zillow Because They’ll Never Own a Home. (Angela Lashbrook for OneZero)

How many bed bugs does it take to shut down and evacuate a subway station? One. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Stonewall Democratic Club of New York City endorsed Elizabeth Warren for president. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

A list of the “absolute best” hot chocolate in the city, with L.A. Burdick at the top of the list. (Leah Koenig for Grub Street)

Say farewell, Train Daddy has left the city. Andy Byford has quit as the president of New York City Transit. (Christina Goldbaum and Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

In two years on the job, Andy Byford actually seemed to be doing good work. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Why Andy, why? The likely reason we’re being left behind is the impending MTA restructuring. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

I don’t think there’s any truth that Byford couldn’t get along with me” -Governor Cuomo, who almost 100% had trouble getting along with Andy Byford. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Will the MTA’s progress be delayed because of Byford’s departure? According to City Councilmember Joe Borelli, “Unfortunately, we lost the good guy and we’re stuck with Andrew.” (Gloria Pazmino for NY 1)

Limited edition ‘Star Trek: Picard’ MetroCards are available at the 14th St and 7th Ave on the 1/2/3, 28th St and 7th Ave on the 1, 57th St and 6th Ave on the F, 42nd St at Union Square on the 4/5/6/L/N/Q/R/W, and 28th and Broadway on the R/W. The MetroCards will be available for the next three weeks. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A preview of the new Hayden Planetarium space show Worlds Beyond Earth, narrated by Lupita Nyong’o. (Jennifer Vanasco for Gothamist)

What’s going to replace Fat Baby on Rivington? Who knows, because the replacement has already been evicted. If you’ve got $23,000 a month, it could be yours. (Bowery Boogie)

Governor Cuomo will push the state’s legislature to pass his electric bike and scooter legalization bill next week, with April 1 being the worst case scenario. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The comments about pushing the legalization came when talking criticizing the de Blasio administration’s “arbitrary” enforcement of the ban with “no uniformity.” Where he sees no leadership from Mayor de Blasio, he intends to create it himself. (Gresh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Cashless stores are a thing of the past. The City Council passed a ban on cashless stores on Thursday, citing that a cash-free business is discriminating against consumers who aren’t in a position to have a back banking you. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Anyone Comics in Crown Heights is hosting a 24-hour comic book creation marathon on February 1.

According to a new study, the two most livable neighborhoods in the city are Battery Park and Brooklyn Heights. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Five sights that show how much lower Manhattan has changed. (Jane Margolies for NY Times)

Fairway filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy and will sell off five stores to complete a sale to the company that operates ShopRite and Gourmet Garage. The stores it will sell off are the Upper West Side, Upper East Side, Chelsea, Harlem and Kips Bay. (Chris Crowley is Grub Street)

Mean Girls: The Musical is becoming a movie. Mean Girls: The Movie: The Musical: The Movie: The Book, coming to theaters soon? (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

Governor Cuomo’s $2 billion AirTrain to LaGuardia has ulterior motives: more overall parking. (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

The Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald portraits of Barack and Michelle Obama are coming to the Brooklyn Museum on August 27 and will be there through October 24. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Six of the oldest cars on the Upper West Side. (David Cunningham for I Love the Upper West Side)

Seven years ago, Brooklyn borough president Marty Markowitz announced Brooklyn would gets its own friendship arch as a gift from the Chinese government to be placed to welcome people to Brooklyn’s Chinatown. After years of planning and announcements, the project appears to be dead. (Yoav Gonan for The City)

Op/Ed: The argument against rezoning Soho/Noho to allow more affordable housing to be built is an argument that recognizes when the city talks about rezoning for affordable housing, they also rezone for super-luxury apartment buildings. (Andrew Berman for GVSHP)

This Sunday is Australia Day, here are 11 ways to celebrate. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Chopt is buying Dos Toros. The new owners are keeping the restaurant chains separate, but they will share a loyalty program. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Congrats to ActionKid on his silver YouTube play button, celebrating 100,000 subscribers. He celebrated by taking a sunrise walk with his new plaque into Manhattan. (ActionKid)

Luxury condo prices are at their lowest levels since 2013, hitting $3,816,835, and the surplus of unsold luxury apartments is still high. Over 25% of Manhattan’s luxury apartments are sitting empty. (Valeri Ricciulli for Curbed)

Photos: For the last few days, a Bald Eagle has been seen in Riverside Park. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

How John Mulaney spends his Sundays. (Paige Darrah for NY Times)

21 restaurants ideal for solo diners. (Diana Hubbell for Eater)

The Briefly for December 26, 2019 – The “Christmas Trees Don’t Belong on the Beach” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: When to throw out your Christmas tree, the secret economy and industry of five cent deposits, Cuomo’s feud with Trump heats up over weddings, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 45˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

A look back at the City Hall Christmas tree lighting, a bygone NYC tradition. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The Rockefeller Center Christmas has an 88-year history. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Video: The inspiring story of Sydney Mesher, the first Rockette with a visible disability. (The Rockettes)

Videos and Photos: The Saks Fifth Avenue Frozen 2 holiday lights. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

How long should you keep your Christmas tree up? At least until January 6, because that’s the first day of the Department of Sanitation’s tree disposal. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

Video: No matter what you read on Facebook, don’t leave your old Christmas tree at the beach. (Anginas Gonzalez for NY1)

Tompkins Square Park has some new trees. (EV Grieve)

Governor Cuomo vetoed a bill that would have allowed federal judges, Trump’s judges, to officiate weddings in New York state. I guess federal judges will have to become online ministers if they want to officiate weddings, just like the rest of us. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The fascinating history of 28 Old Fulton St, from old Dutch farmland to Revolutionary War battle site, from the Eagle pressroom to a warehouse for silver, furniture and then electoral ballots, to its latest use as luxury apartments. (Chase DiBenedetto for Bedford + Bowery)

Years ago two toy stores within a few blocks of each other would be at war around the holidays, but in 2019 Stationary and Toy World and West Side Kids in the Upper West Side are joining forces to fight back against online shopping. (Sara Lewin Lebwohl for I Love the Upper West Side)

Video: Got $75,000 lying around? You can afford one night at the Mark Hotel. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

With the mayor's potentially illegal "horse trading" collusion with ultra-Orthodox state lawmakers surrounding a Department of Education report about the quality of education at the city's yeshivas, advocates are calling for accountability. The city has made no indication of punishment for the 26 of 28 failing schools, instead requiring "timelines for improvement" by January 15 with no information about if schools fail to meet the deadline. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

A state Supreme Court judge has struck down an upcoming New York City rule that would have restricted the amount of time app-based drivers for companies like Uber and Lyft can spend cruising without passengers below 96th Street in Manhattan. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Profiles of five African-American high-profile prisoners from New York City who were convicted of violent crimes that included murder and attempted murder. All committed their first crimes as teenagers. All are now in late middle age, ranging from 48 to 61 and seeking release. A great piece from students at CUNY's Craigs Newmark Graduate School of Journalism. (Stephanie Chukwuma, Trone Dowd, Jeffery Harrell, Brenda León, Hannah Miller, Rosemary Misdary, Rachel Rippetoe, Maria Robins-Somerville, Sean Sanders, and Annie Todd for Gothamist)

8 cultural attractions to visit on NYC’s Museum Mile. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

StreetEasy and Douglas Elliman appear to be ready to lock horns. While the details aren’t exciting, it could portend a coming fracturing of real estate listings. (E. B. Solomont for The Real Deal)

A train delay because of a pencil. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A Bronx police officer is facing accusations of groping a 14-year-old teenager while she was handcuffed in the back of a squad car last month. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Christmas is gone. No literally, Christmas is literally buried in Green-Wood Cemetery. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

The city doesn’t just get rid of its useless junk, it auctions it off. (Winnie Hu and James Sprankle for NY Times)

What’s the opposite of a Christmas miracle? Ask the 1,000 residents in NYCHA housing in Coney Island who woke up with no heat or hot water on Christmas. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

As of this week, bicyclists can use the walk/won’t walk indicators rather than the lights are use. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The latest in the seemingly never-ending battle of Industry City’s rezoning is that things are looking bleak for Industry City after the city is refusing to provide funds for new schools, housing and tenant programs to benefit the neighborhood. The decision to move forward rests with City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, who has been skeptical of the process since the start. It would be unheard of for the city to commit funds for a private application, Menchaca is justifying the request based on how dramatically the rezoning would change Sunset Park. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Has Midtown South become more pleasant for residents in the last few years? Finally, an answer to the eternal question of “who lives here?” (Aileen Jacobson for NY Times)

There is an entire underground economy centered around plastic bottle and metal can deposits, where the world turns five cents at a time. It’s all in a legal gray area that the city turns a blind eye towards, but once you have an understanding of how the canner economy works, you can understand why there is opposition to expanding the five cent deposit program. (Andy Newman for NY Times)

After eating at 300 restaurants this year, Scott Lynch picks his 16 best bites of 2019. (Scott Lynch for Eater)