The Briefly for August 9, 2019 – The “Our Punching Bag Mayor” Edition

The weekend subway delays, the mayor’s potential ethics violations, the city’s new restaurants, David Chang reacts to Stephen Ross’ Trump fundraiser and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend’s subway disruptions hit seven different subway lines. If you’re planning on getting wherever you’re going via the subway, double-check. (Subway Weekender)

Looking for a beach read for the weekend? This piece in the Times about how Bill de Blasio went from a progressive hopeful to Democratic a laughing stock and punching bag is a good read. (NY Times Magazine)

It’s so common for businesses that close “for renovations” to never reopen that places like Boilermaker in the East Village are changing their signs to explicitly state they’ll be reopening. (EV Grieve)

During the trials for the members of the SPLC designated hate group The Proud Boys for their part in starting fights following a talk from founder Gavin McInnes in Manhattan, the members of the Proud Boys claim that it was the Antifa members that posed a threat and they were simply defending themselves. (NY Times)

8 places to staycation and vacation this summer. (amNY)

When the city put a freeze on the number of cars it allowed for ride-hailing apps, drivers claimed it was unfair because of the price of leasing one of the licensed cars. Now the Taxi & Limousine Commission is investigating those leases. (Patch)

Is this the best egg salad sandwich in New York City? Gothamist believes they’ve found it at Bibble and Sip. (Gothamist)

Michael Collopy was hit and killed by a cyclist on the corner of 23rd and 6th earlier this week, the second pedestrian to be killed by a cyclist in 2019. 23rd and 6th is particularly dangerous, a cyclist was killed at the intersection in June and there have been multiple crashes in the last five years there. (Gothamist)

Stephen Ross, president of the company that owns Equinox, Blink Fitness, SoulCycle, and PURE Yoga and an investor in multiple popular restaurants is hosting a $100k/plate fundraiser for the president’s re-election campaign, “strongly disagrees” with the president, but it’s not stopping him from hosting the fundraiser anyway. (Gothamist)

Stephen Ross was “the only potential investor” in David Chang’s Momofuku. Chang asked Ross to cancel the fundraiser on his podcast but didn’t mention if he actually asked Ross to cancel the fundraiser personally or if he decided that mentioning it on his podcast would absolve him of the situation. (Eater)

Chang isn’t the only chef doing damage control after his connection to Stephen Ross became public. Christina Tosi of Milk took investment from Ross and José Andrés opened multiple restaurants in the Hudson Yards, where Ross is his landlord. Both have issued statements to publicly distance themselves from Ross, but have not made a statement about what they intend to do moving forward. (Grub Street)

BAM commissioned Leo Villareal, Teresita Fernández and Hank Willis Thomas to create public art for its Fort Greene campus, to be completed in the next two years. (6sqft)

Photos from inside the Paley Center’s Marvelous Mrs. Maisel exhibit. (Untapped Cities)

Don’t be alarmed, but a venomous snake may have gotten loose from the Bronx Zoo and no one knows where it is. Not as much fun as the loose cobra from a few years ago, some signs have been posted to keep your eyes open for a “nervous” black and yellow mangrove snake. (Gothamist)

Okay, let’s talk about the summer of White Claw. (Grub Street)

If you’re the kind of person who loves awful experiences, you can watch this 41-minute 43-second interview between Sean Hannity and Bill de Blasio. (Gothamist)

Each generation of commerce ruins the previous generation’s pillars and tenets and the slow and public death of the Sex and the City-type shopping experiences are no different. Even in this piece in the Times which bemoans when shopping “felt like art,” Ginia Bellafante admits that the stores she looks back on fondly are the same stores that signaled “the beginning of SoHo’s end.” (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio has taken his local ethics-violating campaign financing to his failing presidential bid, or as Susan Lerner of Common Cause New York describes him, “a walking ethical disaster.” (Gothamist)

The MTA’s fare hikes won’t help address financial woes, due to the fare hikes outpacing increases in income for poorer New Yorkers. If fares continue to go up, but not wages, mass transit becomes less of an option for the people who need it most. (Patch)

Even hawks need some privacy while destroying a pigeon on the sidewalk. (Gothamist)

Traffic at LaGuardia was so bad last night that the nearby highways and internal roads were full of people abandoning their rides in buses, cabs, and cars to walk in an attempt to catch their flights. (Gothamist)

New York City Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza is popular with parents amid calls for his firing, a new survey shows. Carranza has been accused of sowing racial division due to his push for racial integration of the city’s school. (Patch)

19 new restaurants in NYC. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 3, 2019 – The “Pick A Side: Iced Coffee vs Cold Brew” Edition

Everything you need for July 4, the drink of the summer, new school gender inclusion guidelines, lying roaches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s the deal with the subways and buses on July 4. (6sqft)

Expect massive crowds and tight security if you’re checking out the fireworks over the east river. (Patch)

Safety tips for pet owners on July 4. (amNY)

Each year’s Fourth of July fireworks display in the city starts in the California desert, in 11 underground bunkers in high-security facilities. (NY Times)

What’s open and what’s closed on July 4. (Patch)

The New York Times is never why when it comes to controversy, and they jumped in head-first with this one. Is cold brew better than iced coffee? (NY Times)

Checking in with Tom’s Restaurant on the Upper West Side 30 years after Seinfeld‘s pilot aired. (Gothamist)

The top 10 secrets of Arthur Avenue in the Bronx. (Untapped Cities)

Despite every last inch of Manhattan having been developed, there is still wildlife. With the year half over, coyote sightings in Central Park are at quadruple the level they were for all of 2018. If you encounter one, leave it alone and report it. (I Love the Upper West Side)

While conservatives around the country are mounting challenges to Roe v Wade, New York City has become more accommodating to those seeking an abortion. Charities helping women afford abortions are seeing a higher percentage of those women come from outside the city. The city even set aside a quarter of a million dollars in support for the New York Abortion Access Fund to assist people from outside the city be able to afford an abortion. (Gothamist)

The okapi diorama at the Museum of Natural History is considered to be one of the world’s most impressive taxidermy dioramas. Here’s the story behind the diorama and even the one riddle/practical joke that can be found if you look close enough. (Atlas Obscura)

NYC Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza issued new gender inclusion guidelines to better support the city’s 1.1 million students. The guide touches on sports, name and gender changes, dress codes, and more. While they are still only guidelines, they are being praised by advocacy groups as a good start. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Don’t be alarmed, but we’ve hit “the cockroaches are flying” time of year. (Gothamist)

Right now the city’s homeless shelters turn away people with pets, which becomes a real problem for the 10-25% of people experiencing homelessness who have pets. More than 98% of animals surrendered to the city’s Animal Care Centers in the last six months are due to their owners’ homelessness. Two bills making their way towards the city council could change that. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s restaurants have begun to embrace the latest food trend: chickpeas. (amNY)

Sometimes it’s better not to ask. Like, “What is that black, smelly liquid pouring out of the elevator at Grand Central?” Maybe that’s information we should never know. “Why was it gushing out and why did it smell like sewage?” These are more questions that should not be asked because you probably don’t want to know the answer. (Gothamist)

On any given day you can find multiple photos of NYPD vehicles using the city’s bike lanes like personal parking garages, which makes the mayor’s declaration that the NYPD is going to start taking drivers in the city’s bike lanes laughable. (Streetsblog)

Apologies to our mayor, who had his time in Iowa interrupted to discuss the three bicyclist deaths in the city in the last week. A “crisis,” but not enough of a crisis to deal with it within the confines of the city that he’s supposed to be in charge of. The mayor was short on details, aside from increased NYPD enforcement of pre-existing laws. (Gothamist)

The crackdown is not permanent, but a three-week targeted enforcement. (Streetsblog)

Fact-checking the president’s claims that New York’s taxes are driving people away. (NY Times)

Our president is a serial liar, so no one should be surprised that despite his claims that he’s never had an alcoholic drink that he regularly drank in New York City, according to a new book by Allen Salkin. (Vice)

The first section of a state park honoring the first African-American woman elected to Congress, Shirley Chisholm, is open in Brooklyn. (Curbed)

The city is speckled with the history of the revolutionary war if you know where to look. (amNY)

Remember the city’s styrofoam ban? It’s in effect and the first fines have been issued. (Gothamist)

Central Park’s Belvedere Castle is open after a 15-month renovation. (Time Out)

The drink of the summer: The Gin and Tonic Plus (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for June 28, 2019 – The “These Could Be the Grossest Places in the City” Edition

Subway disruptions during WorldPride, LaGuardia’s Airtrain gets a $2 billion price tag, NYC declares a climate emergency, and more today in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The MTA promised “full service” during WorldPride this weekend. That is, of course, mostly a lie and there are disruptions on 9 subway lines this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

The city’s 53 pools are officially open! (Time Out)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s influence in the Queens DA primary was invaluable to Tiffany Caban, and since AOC won her own primary that took her to Congress, she’s learned to master Washington DC’s game on her own terms. (Politico)

No matter how gross you think the city’s public restrooms are inside of parks, you’d be making an under-estimation. (Gothamist)

The real estate industry is planning on making a constitutional challenge to the state’s rent reform laws, arguing their fifth amendment rights were violated, in an attempt o shot the case to the Supreme Court as quickly as possible. (The Real Deal)

How does the city prioritize road improvements? Take a look at the two streets recently paved in Willets Point and you might find your answer. In preparation for a film shoot, the Department of Transportation rolled out the blacktop carpet. (Queens Crap)

The City Council joined over 600 other localities around the world in declaring a climate emergencytaken its place in the Manhattan County Courthouse, thanks to the Municipal Art Society of NYC’s “Adopt A Monument/Mural” program. (Untapped Cities)

An argument in favor of the peanut butter ice being the flavor of the city’s summer. (Grub Street)

A look at the state legislature’s failed attempt to legalize marijuana through the lens of the Cuomo Catch-22. Everything is too early to talk about until it’s too late to consider. (Gothamist)

The best friend chicken in the city is on Avenue C. The top 20 friend chicken spots in the city. (Grub Street)

A fourth NYPD officer committed suicide in the last month. (Patch)

The state is waiting on the governor’s signature on a bill that would require the makers of floss, tampons, pads, condoms, menstrual cups, and other similar products (floss really stands out as the outlier in that list, right?) to list the ingredients used similar to how it’s done with food in an attempt to force companies to reduce the number of toxic materials used in their products. (Gothamist)

After the demolition of its most historic structures, what does Red Hook’s future look like? (Curbed)

Seven people were arrested in a drug bust in Bushwick that was focused on heroin being sold near an elementary school and inside of the Bushwick Houses public housing development. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

All of NYC’s Congressional delegates are asking NYC Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza to conduct lead-dust testing in public school buildings after a WNYC investigation found lead four schools. In addition, they asked for the results to be made public, and to have a plan to move students in schools where lead-dust is found. The mayor, instead of supporting their calls, is questioning the test WNYC employed. (Gothamist)

The Knuffle Bunny, a character created by Park Slope’s Mo Willems, will live in bronze statue form outside of the Brooklyn Public Library’s Park Slope branch. (amNY)

The New York Botanical Garden’s corpse flower started to open on Thursday at 2pm, so if you hurry you can still experience that “rotting meat in the sun” scent. (Gothamist)

Take a look at the designs of the LaGuardia Airport of the future that will bring it in line with “New York standards,” according to the governor. Hopefully, he’s referring to a different set of standards we have for the subways. (Gothamist)

The LaGuardia AirTrain’s cost was estimated at $450 million in 2014. In 2019? We’ve just arrived at $2.05 billion. (amNY)

The mayor stepped out of the debate in Miami and firmly planted his foot in his mouth when “accidentally” quoting Che Guevara. Now the entire country gets to feel what only city residents have felt. (NY Times)

If you’ve been outside Hook & Ladder 8 (Ghostbusters HQ), you’re seeing the remnants of Paul Rudd’s announcement that he’ll be in the next Ghostbusters movie. (Gothamist)

If you’re still stinging from being left out in the cold by MoviePass, the Alamo Drafthouse in Brooklyn is testing out a Season Pass at the cost between $20 or $30 a month. (BrooklynVegan)

There’s a small area of Bed Stuy that’s been plagued with a mysterious sound that’s been causing hangover-like headaches for more than a month. (Patch)

It’s so hot (how hot is it?) that the DOT was hosing down the Metropolitan Ave bridge because it wouldn’t close because of the heat. (Gothamist)

Video: Decoding the secret language of the city’s street signs, numbers, and letters. (Quartz)

Say hello to the baby peregrine falcons near the Bayonne Bridge who recently made their first flights. They have been given the World War II-themed names Rosie, Martha, And Juno. (Gothamist)

Google is trying to predict how crowded your subway, bus, or train will be. Even if they only ever displayed “very crowded,” it would be believable. (amNY)

A very specific list: Where to go when confronting your BFF about sleeping with your crush. (Eater)

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