The Briefly for April 30, 2019 – The “Luxury Living in a Toxic Waste Flood Zone” Edition

A gun buyback program in Queens, the NYPD strays from following the law, the new Airbnb/office building hybrid takes Rockefeller Center, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Borough President Melinda Katz put forward a plan to address Queens’ gun violence, including a 24/7 gun buyback program and new education programs. We’re two weeks from the primary for the Queens District Attorney and Katz is a candidate. (QNS)

The allergy forecast continues to be at “high” or “very High” without a sign of “moderate” in sight. Stay indoors. (Patch)

The 6 oldest buildings in the Bronx. (Untapped Cities)

30-story buildings on toxic waste sites that are in flood zones. Welcome to the Gowanus rezoning. (Curbed)

Another hidden tax. Restaurants have begun charging customers fees for paying with a credit card. (MarketWatch)

Photos from Sakura Matsuri Cherry Blossom festival at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden. (Gothamist)

Watch a time-lapse of the Goethals Bridge construction. (EarthCam)

Sounds like no one like Rhode Island style “pizza.” (Eater)

Welcome to the neighborhoods in the city with seven playgrounds for every 10,000 kids, the playground deserts. (Patch)

10 stories of a 33 story office building in Rockefeller Center will be converted from offices to Airbnbs. This is one of a few office/hotel hybrids coming to the city. (Curbed)

Take a historic tour of the 2,200 buildings of Greenwich Village, 50 years after it was given landmark designation. (6sqft)

Seems like The Palm is the new Spotted Pig. The chain is accused multiple times over of nurturing an atmosphere of sexual harassment. The restaurant’s attorney denies the claims. (Eater)

The story of how McGuinness Blvd became McGuinness Blvd, from its start as the cobblestone Oakland Street. (Greenpointers)

AOC had her first town hall, fielding questions about the Green New Deal and Amazon HQ2. (QNS)

Legal Aid is suing the city in an attempt to get the NYPD to actually follow the law and stop penalizing workers who use electric bikes for deliveries. (Gothamist)

The big boards at Grand Central Terminal are going all digital and it’s hard not to see that as a loss, no matter how convenient the upgrade may be. (Gothamist)

Uber and Lyft’s explosive growth in the city has stopped on a dime, as neither are hiring new drivers. The city’s pay regulations appear to be having the intended effect. Since the $17.22 minimum wage for drivers went into effect, drivers have earned $56 million more than they would have otherwise. (Politico)

The B39 bus gets the New York Times profile treatment. (New York Times)

Six of the season's best neighborhood food festivals. (6sqft)

Everything new you need to know about camping on Governors Island. (Time Out)

“IT WAS PROFISIZED [sic] IN THE LATE 20th CENTURY. AN Angel OF DEATH SHALL WASTE THIS PLACE. NOW I ASK YOU DO YOU BELIEVE IT TO BE TRUE?….THE DOCTOR.” No one asked for this on their mozzarella cheese packaging. (Gothamist)

“By entering these premises you agree not to run for President of the United States in 2020 or in any future presidential race,” says the signs at the YMCA that Mayor de Blasio visits to work out. Not all heroes wear capes. (Patch)

Early voting is likely coming to NYC. The mayor proposed 100 early voting sites for the 2019 general election, the 2020 presidential primary, and the 2020 June primary. (amNY)

The Right to Know Act went into effect in October, which mandated that NYPD officers give business cards to people they stop and ask permission to perform stop and frisk searches. According to the Justice Committee, they haven’t been doing either. (Patch)

The MTA’s express buses are no longer accept cash, but without the OMNY system and without MetroCard machines at express bus stops, some New Yorkers are feeling their commutes threatened. While less than 1% of people use cash, that 1% likely depend on it for their ability to pay the $6.75 fare. (Gothamist)

The five best burritos in New York this week. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for October 26, 2018 – The “New York’s Vampire King Will See You Now” Edition

All the weekend’s scheduled subway changes, another bookstore announces a closure, the ultimate list of Halloween events, the Right to Know Act, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

New York’s Vampire King has seen a resurgence since the city’s 1990 goth club phase, as the immortal curiosity and the internet have brought New York’s vampire culture back from the dead. (NY Times)

This weekend’s scheduled subway changes includes bad news for the L, Q, and 7 trains.

The ultimate list of 75+ Halloween events for $35 and under. (the skint)

Billboard barges are the new norm. (Bowery Boogie)

All of Terminal 5 at JFK’s bathrooms were completely shut down on Thursday for multiple hours due to a broken water main. Yikes. (Gothamist) Okay, that’s pretty bad, but here’s some good news for travelers. WiFi is now free in JFK, LaGuardia and (if you must) Newark airports! (amNY)

10 secrets from FDR Four Freedoms Park on Roosevelt Island. (Untapped Cities)

This is the last outdoor weekend for Smorgasburg and the last weekend for the Queens Night Market. (Eater)

Did someone projectile vomit on you while riding the M train? She would like to apologize. (@anateboteo)

Are all the city’s bookstores closing? After 101 years, The Drama Book Shop on W 40th is set to close in 2019. (Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about the Right To Know Act. (Bklyner)

See Broadway, from Bowling Green to 56th St, as it was in 1899 with these pectoral descriptions that pre-date Google Street View by a few years. (NYPL)

They met on OKCupid, went back to his place, and she left with his $10,000 watch. (NY Post)

Halloween Impalement returns to Cobble Hill this year. (Gothamist)

WinterFest, and an ice skating rink, is coming to the Brooklyn Museum. (6sqft)

The Sunnyside Yards project offers the city an amazing opportunity, but even with community involvement, will they find a way to ruin it? (Sunnyside Post)

During the NY Senate debate between sitting Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and Chele Farley, Gillibrand made it clear she has no intentions of running for president in 2020. (ABC7)

What the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights $5 million Mass Bailout action is all about, from a volunteer’s perspective. (Gothamist)

The coach bus driver who killed a man on a CitiBike will be going to jail for the maximum amount of time allowed by law, 30 days, after being convicted of a misdemeanor and traffic infraction. (NY Post)

How far is too far for the influence national politics has on a local scale? (NY Times)

The best lunch spots in 40 different neighborhoods. (Thrillist)


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