The Briefly for March 28, 2019 – The “Everyone Flushes Their Dog’s Poop Down the Toilet, Right?” Edition

A bagel abomination, the NYPD fights new parking placard laws, the NYC James Beard Award finalists, no one wants to see more cops on buses, and more in today’s daily NYC news brief.

Here is an argument that Times Square is not the Gowanus Canal dining options and it is actually a good neighborhood for food. (Grub Street)

The latest bagel abomination is bagels sliced like loaves of bread instead of a sandwich. Arrest this man. (Gothamist)

The state and city’s Democrats have no love for the real estate industry. Can they successfully lobby the left to do their bidding? (The Real Deal)

The answer appears to be “yes.” The proposed pied-à-terre tax would affect 280 people, and in the face of opposition by the real estate industry, the state’s legislators have appeared to back down in favor of a transfer tax. The estimated difference in revenue is $250 million ($400 million for the transfer tax and vs $650 million for the pied-à-terre tax). A $250 million reduction for the benefit of 280 people. (Curbed)

You bring your dog’s poop home in bags and flush it down the toilet, right? Well, that’s what a deputy director at the Department of Sanitation thinks you should do. Legally, it is 100% legal to toss those poop bags in a public garbage can. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is seeking support (and signatures) in opposition of a rezoning that would cast a literal shadow over portions of the garden, causing irreparable harm to the plants. (bbg.org)

A truck driver hit and killed a cyclist in Midtown, the third driver from Approved Oil to kill a pedestrian or cyclist in two years. The driver allegedly fled the scene but was not charged with leaving the scene of a crash, which is a felony. (Gothamist)

Just when you thought a commute couldn’t get worse, a water main break caused 7th Avenue to close between 27th and 34th St. (NY Post)

NYC restaurants lost jobs (3.4%) for the first time in ten years in 2018. At the same time, the total number of restaurants increased by 2,000. (Eater)

The city’s 2019 James Beard Award finalists are in. Make your reservations while you still can. (Eater)

Time Out has some feelings about the list. (Time Out)

The city wants your feedback on these ideas for the Shirley Chisholm monument in Prospect Park. (amNY)

Yankees and vintage train fans have something to look forward to. Today’s home opener this year will be accompanied by a 102-year-old subway train bringing fans to the stadium on the 4 train. (6sqft)

Where to eat at Yankee Stadium. (Eater)

A new Grand Street Bridge will be complete by 2027. Now we just have to hope that the current span between Queens and Brooklyn will last that until then. (QNS)

Turns out no one wants cops on city buses enforcing everyone pay their fares. 75% of bus riders are people of color with a median income under $30k and advocates and politicians are see the idea of policing that specific demographic as racial profiling. (Streetsblog)

The death of one-year-old Darwin Gonzalez-Santana in December was ruled a homicide after fentanyl and heroin were found in his system. His father is not in police custody and his mother is already in custody for another offense. (NY Post)

Eight remnants of colonial NYC that you can still touch. (Untapped Cities)

For $25,000, you can dine (and attempt to influence) Governor Cuomo. Who needs campaign finance reform when it costs 19 ounces of gold to share a meal? (NY Times)

The review process for Mayor de Blasio’s Rikers Island alternative jail system is underway. (Bklyner)

Horrifically, someone fell face first onto the track of the L train in Brooklyn. Witnesses couldn’t get him off the tracks in time, but they were able to signal to the conductor to stop the train before he was run over. (Gothamist)

Mark your calendars, Fleet Week is May 22 – 28. (Gothamist)

Congestion pricing, explained. (Curbed)

If you don’t know what Williamsburg looked like in the 90s, you owe it to yourself to take a look at the neighborhood pre-hipster. (Bedford + Bowery)

The latest volley in the legal battle between the city and Ballyhoo Media, the operator of the floating LED billboards in the city’s waterways, is a lawsuit form the city with $25,000 fines for each day the city says Ballyhoo broke zoning rules. (Patch)

Mayor de Blasio said delivery workers who are caught using electric bikes won’t be directly targeted by legal action. The NYPD doesn’t care what he says. (Gothamist)

The socialite grifter’s lawyer has an interesting defense planned: She’s just like Sinatra. (NY Post)

The City Council has unlikely opposition in their quest to fight parking placard abuse: the NYPD. The city’s likely biggest abusers say that the job they’re doing is already top notch. (amNY)

TGI Friday’s, have you no shame? (NY Post)

An interview with Brittany Bond, the purveyor of Common Books, the pushcart bookstore that can be found in the Lower East Side year round. (Bowery Boogie)

A list of good places to break up with someone in public. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 26, 2019 – The “Hey Chicago, Do You Have Any Ideas?” Edition

Bed bugs on Broadway, the MTA asks Chicago for help, subway ridership continues to decline, the history of the best $1 pizza, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Governors Island is getting a new arts center in an old munitions warehouse. If you’ve been to the island before, it’s the building near the Manhattan ferry landing with public bathrooms. (Curbed)

An investigation has found credible allegations of sexual misconduct at Saint Ann’s School, the Brooklyn private school known for an experimental approach to education, including male teachers having sex with students. (NY Times)

The MTA, out of ideas on how to stop the 7 train from literally falling apart, is asking Chicago if they have any ideas. (NY Post)

The origin story of the city’s best $1 pizza chain. Isn’t the best $1 pizza akin to the sexiest magician? (Viewing NYC)

New York has fond feelings for a mayor’s 2020 presidential run, and it ain’t de Blasio. (NY Times)

The MTA claims subway performance is increasing, while ridership continues to decline. (NY Post)

A Lyft driver was found unconscious in the back of his vehicle early on Saturday morning. He was pronounced dead of an apparent suicide. This marks the ninth taxi suicide in about 16 months. (Patch)

A preview of Astoria’s Socrates Sculpture Park spring 2019 lineup. (We Heart Astoria)

The city nurses’ strike has been postponed while negotiations are ongoing. (amNY)

Is installing facial recognition software at the entrance of a rent-stabilized apartment building going too far? (Gothamist)

The city’s proposed pied-à-terre tax could cut the most expensive apartments’ price in the city in half. Don’t worry, they’ll still be unattainable. (6sqft)

It’s like a Lyft, but helicopters between Manhattan and JFK for $195 a seat. (NY Post)

Marijuana legalization has failed in New Jersey. (NY Times)

Thanks to a $600,000 from real estate developer iStar, Coney Island’s free summer concerts will continue through 2025. (BrooklynVegan)

Longtime Bronx congressperson Jose Serrano announced he will not seeking reelection in 2020 because he has been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. (Politico)

Maybe you heard there was an avocado recall. The brutal berries are in Arizona, California, Florida, New Hampshire, North Carolina, and Wisconsin. Not New York. (Grub Street)

Jumaane Williams’s old 45th Council District is headed for a special election on May 14 after Jumaane Williams won the special election for the Public Advocate. There are nine hopefuls who plan to run for the seat. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Are you ready for a LEGO-but-not-actual-LEGO-themed bar? (Time Out)

The city’s proposed “express” bus route once the L train rehab begins is anything but express. (Curbed)

A breakdown of how the $78 million sewage tanks for the Gowanus Canal actually cost over over $1.2 billion. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

State Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie said the state is “ready to go forward” on congestion pricing. (amNY)

More controversial than congestion pricing is the city’s plans to replace Rikers Island with four smaller jails in every borough except Staten Island. The first step of the application process is complete. (Patch)

Did you know the fountain of youth is in the Bronx? (Atlas Obscura)

From the “don’t go anywhere ever again” files, theater goers on Broadway claim to have “eaten alive” by bedbugs during a performance of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. The theater denies the claims. (Gothamist)

A fire prevented the Islamic Society of Mid-Manhattan from prayers on Friday and the Reform Jewish congregation of Central Synagogue stepped up to provide space for their prayers. (HuffPost)

20 restaurants you can actually get into. Tell your friends you “know a guy who can get you in” and be a hero. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for New Year’s Eve, 2018 – The “One Million Soaking Wet People in Diapers Looking Up” Edition

Happy New Year from The Briefly! Corey Johnson will become acting NYC public advocate, no umbrellas in Times Square, the best New Year’s brunch, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

You can’t leave to go to the bathroom and other things you need to know about Times Square tonight. (You’ll need diapers.) (amNY)

The NYPD will have 1,225 cameras in Times Square, including the first time use of drones at a large-scale event. (NY Post)

Today’s forecast calls for rain starting in the afternoon and going past the ball drop at midnight, which adds a hurdle for the masses in Times Square who are not allowed to bring umbrellas into the heavily policed area. (NYC.gov)

Hush hush, Mayor de Blasio wants to reduce city noise. (NY Post)

It started as investigating a gas leak and ended with the discovery of two grow houses in the Bronx. (Gothamist)

Everyone wants a piece of legal weed, including unions. The Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union has hopes to unionize the thousands of workers who will handle or sell cannabis once it’s legal. (NY Post)

Add another entry to the “do not do this on the subway” list. This one’s for everyone, not just the perverts, weirdos, or man-spreaders. (Gothamist)

Everything you need to know about getting around tonight. (Curbed)

The Fair Fares program, which will provide reduced transit fares for low-income New Yorkers, is scheduled to launch in January, but the are no details about the program released by the mayor’s office. (NY Post)

The 12 hottest brunch spots in the city. (Eater)

Take a front row seat to last week’s Astoria Borealis with these videos. (Gothamist)

The East Side Access project connecting the LIRR and MetroNorth has hit a crippling obstacle: bureaucracy. (NY Post)

Could Letitia James’ focus on President Trump backfire with judges that may see a political vendetta instead of a pursuit of justice? (NY Times)

The special election for Public Advocate will be held on February 26, 2019. (NY Post)

Until a new public advocate is elected, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will pull double duty, taking on on the role of acting public advocate. (NY Times)

A retired Internal Affairs detective, Staten Island’s William Nolan, was arrested for allegedly sending threatening emails to former colleagues in the NYPD. A cache of weapons was also seized. He was described as a “ticking time bomb” and is out on bail. (NY Post)

“This isn’t Rikers. … We do what we want here.” A lawsuit alleges that Rikers inmates are sent upstate to skirt NYC laws where they are beaten, put in solitary confinement, and forced to undergo rectal searches. (Yahoo)

City employees have over $650,000 of unpaid parking tickets and violations. Of all of the employees to have received tickets or summonses, one person has had their driving privileges revoked. (NY Post)

The Gowanus Canal seems like an odd inspiration for Calvin Klein, but you can buy a Foundation Trucker Jacket in the color”Gowanus Black.” (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD busted the Fausto Stillo barber shop in Sunset Park for running an illegal cockfighting operation. (NY Post)

16 hangover-busting dishes for New Years Day brunch. (Eater)

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