The Briefly for August 13, 2019 – The “Polling at 0.11% and Not Giving Up” Edition

Corey Johnson opposes the 14th St busway, a Keith Haring work is getting restored, how much can a roommate save you, the history of Gotham, and more in today’s daily NY news digest.

Get ready for some heavy patches of rain today and through tomorrow morning. Good news, it will be clear for John Trivialta at Parklife on Wednesday night! (Patch)

After 100 years of business on the Bowery, Faerman Cash Register Co. has closed its doors for the last time. It’s not high rent that’s pushing them out, it’s real estate taxes. As a result, the family is putting the building up for sale. (Untapped Cities)

Never a person who learns from failure, the mayor says he plans on campaigning even when he doesn’t qualify for the third set of Democratic primary debates in September. The mayor received 23 out of about 20,000 votes in the Iowa “Corn Poll” last week. (Politico)

A video surfaced of the horrific car crash on Coney Island Avenue in Midwood that resulted in the killing of Park Slope’s Jose Alzorriz. This is the second death on Coney Island Avenue in a month and one of 578 crashes in the last year. The mayor was distracted from eating corn dogs and walking around Iowa while polling at 0% support long enough to give a statement. (Gothamist)

Ten secrets of Gracie Mansion, the home of the mayor when he’s actually in the city. (Untapped Cities)

Patience and Fortitude, the lions outside the New York Public Library, are going to be laser cleaned and have their cracks repaired (the cement ones). (6sqft)

Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson story “The Lightning Thief” is getting a limited run on Broadway that starts in September and runs through January. Also headed to broadway? “Diana,” a musical about Princess Diana will begin in the same theater as “The Lightning Theif” in March. (NY Times)

87 percent of NYCHA apartments went without heat or hot water at some point last winter. Believe it or not, that number represents a decrease from the previous winter. (Curbed)

Layleen Cubilette-Polanco’s family is suing the city for placing her in solitary confinement when her medical conditions should have forbidden the Department of Corrections from placing her there. (Patch)

We are a month away from the 25th anniversary of ‘Friends’ dominating the city, so the release of a Central Perk LEGO set shouldn’t be a surprise. (6sqft)

Should you move to New York City? Probably not. (Curbed)

The city’s annual topless parade is August 25, one day before Women’s Equality Day, which starts on W 58th and Eighth Ave and continues to Bryant Park. (amNY)

Keith Haring’s “Crack is Wack” on Harlem River Drive in East Harlem is being restored. (6sqft)

“When you see someone being ableist to you or someone else, don’t ignore it, correct it. And for the record, if you see a complete stranger who is also differently-abled, it’s not weird to say “hi.” In a world full of abled body people it’s nice to know that there is someone just like us.” -Sasha Bogen, 2019 graduate of Achievement First Brooklyn High School (Kings County Politics)

The NYPD admitted it subpoenas Google and uses location data collected from Google Maps and other Google applications in order to locate suspects or witnesses. (Gothamist)

Veggie Castle is expanding into Brooklyn. (Time Out)

Arthur Schwartz is the public face of the 14th St busway opposition and protests are scheduled on Wednesday outside of his W. 12th St home. (The Villager)

Corey Johnson, who has regularly stated he wants to break the city’s car culture came out in opposition of the 14th St busway. (amNY)

Roommates in NYC. Can having one save you money? How much can they save you? Let’s find out. (Curbed)

Where did the “Gotham” nickname come from? It’s an insult lobbed at the city by Washington Irving of “Sleepy Hollow” and “Rip Van Winkle” fame. (StreetEasy)

The mayor is questioning the circumstances surrounding Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide. (NY Times)

Should government-run and -affiliated pension funds divest from fossil fuel company stock? A look at the politicians pro and anti divestment. (Gotham Gazette)

After her defeat in the Queens DA primary, what’s next for Tiffany Cabán? (NY Times)

Prescriptions for free fruits and vegetables? Yes, as apart of the Pharmacy to farm program. (Huff Post)

Williamsburg’s L’industrie Pizzeria sits atop Eat This, Not That’s list of the best pizza in the state of New York. (Patch)

The best new restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 1, 2019 – The “There Are Many Reasons to Dislike Mayor de Blasio” Edition

The Governor’s strategy to stay in the news, mustard ice cream, a call for bike lanes in Long Island City and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Congrats to Queens’ Dalilah Muhammad for breaking a world record in the 400-meter hurdles. (Patch)

Sunday is Lou Reed Thai Chi Day at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch. (amNY)

It took four days of public pressure, but the mayor has finally acknowledged the Brownsville tragedy as a mass shooting. According to the mayor, he’s “come to realize it’s critical we call this what it was.” Would he have changed his mind if not for being publicly chastized about his choice of words? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“De Blasio Appealing To Rural Voters By Touting Destruction Of New York City Under His Watch.” This article from The Onion is so close to reality it’s almost not funny. (The Onion)

All of the 2020 candidates’ favorability ratings increase with the most national exposure they have, except Bill de Blasio. The mayor is the only presidential candidate with a net favorability rating that is under zero. (FiveThirtyEight)

The biggest problem with the mayor is that there are a lot of petty reasons to dislike him, from the time he maybe killed a groundhog in Staten Island to his refusal to not be driven eleven miles to work out, to just being painfully uncool, but for every petty reason there is a substantive reason like his handling of Eric Garner’s death or his multiple ethics scandals or his handling of the Amazon HQ2 situation. Who would continue to run for president despite being universally disliked and polling at virtually zero? The same kind of person that would see 75% of the city he is the mayor of doesn’t want him to run for president in the first place and do it anyway. (Vox)

The mayor is on the presidential trail claiming the city will pass a paid personal leave bill this year, but the city council is not committed to his timeline. (Gotham Gazette)

15 new public art installations not to miss this month. (Untapped Cities)

Governor Cuomo signed a bill into law that prohibits school districts to allow teachers or administrators from carrying guns in schools. To quote the governor, the answer to the nation’s school shooting problem “has never been and never will be more guns.” (NY Times)

Have you noticed a steady stream of news about the governor signing bills into law this month? It’s a strategy that Cuomo uses to stay in the news during an otherwise quiet month of the year. (Politico)

Video: What is Louise Jean Signore from the Bronx’s secret to living to 107? Never get married! (Welcome2TheBronx)

The roof of Essex Crossing houses the Essex Crossing Farm. At 10,000 square feet, it’s the largest urban farm in Manhattan and their annual goal is at least 10,000 pounds of produce a year. (Bedford + Bowery)

7 minority-owned businesses in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The mayor is still on pace to hit 300,000 new affordable housing units by 2026, but production has dropped by 22% this year. The difference from 32,344 to 25,299 can partially be attributed to a rare deal made in 2018 for 5,000 units, and not the rent reform laws passed this year, as landlord advocates have claimed. (Gothamist)

The city could do a lot with $40 million, but it’s spent that amount on misconduct lawsuits against the NYPD since January. (Gothamist)

A look at Jay Myself, a documentary which takes a look at the longtime owner of one of the city’s most enigmatic buildings. (Curbed)

City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer is calling for a Long Island City bike lane network. (LIC Post)

What has the city done to prevent cyclists from getting doored? “Basically nothing,” according to the founder of the Dutch Reach project. (Gothamist)

How to stay safe as a cyclist, and of course all drivers should know about the Dutch reach. (Brooklyn Based)

A group of luxury homeowners sued to try to stop the city from installing protected bike lanes on Central Park West. It was denied by a judge and construction has begun. (Gothamist)

An interview with Sally Tallant, the new director of the Queens Museum. (Untapped Cities)

The story of 24-year-old David Ballinger, who learned the hard way through a nearly unbelievable series of events that when it comes to finding an apartment in New York City, don’t trust anyone. (Gothamist)

City Comptroller and mayoral hopeful Scott Stringer’s latest opinion piece: We need a childcare revolution in N.Y.C. (The Villager)

Mayoral hopeful and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams’s latest opinion piece makes the appeal for the Brownsville shooting not to reduce the neighborhood to a stereotype, drawing comparisons to the president’s recent treatment of Baltimore. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Have you noticed that Amazon seems to be interested in all of New York City except Long Island City? (LICtalk)

Three Republicans in the state’s legislature want to make throwing water on police officers a felony. The Legal Aid Society called the proposed legislation “embarrassing.” (Patch)

The cause of death for Layleen Cubilette-Polanco, the transgender inmate found dead in her Rikers Island cell last month, was due to an epileptic seizure. (Gothamist)

The top 10 hidden beaches in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

A day on City Island, which sounds like a little slice of a small New England beach town in the city. (NY Times)

Spend a day in Little Odessa, a neighborhood in complement to Brighton Beach. (amNY)

A look at the fascinating history of Coney Island’s Sea Gate community. (6sqft)

A third person has drowned at Rockaway Beach this year. (amNY)

Mustard ice cream? Yeah, it’s a thing and Coolhaus is giving some away this weekend for National Mustard Day, sponsored by French’s Mustard. (Gothamist)

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The Briefly for July 10, 2019 – The “20,000 People Buried Under Washington Square Park” Edition

Today’s US Women’s National Team parade, a series of stabbings, here comes an express F train, the latest in the BQE rehab, Arcade Bakery is closing, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Saw Mill Playground in Mott Haven reopened with the added bonus of being outfitted with infrastructure that can handle stormwater runoff, up to 1.3 million gallons a year. (Bronx Times)

The cross-town rivalry has been rekindled, but replace town with the country. With DeNiro opening a new studio complex and Netflix expanding big in New York, we’re ready to challenge Hollywood. (NY Times)

Transit Alternatives held a “mass die-in” in Washington Square Park on Tuesday, protesting the street safety crisis that has lead to 15 cyclists killed by drivers in 2019. (amNY)

If you’re someone who gets creeped out at the idea of bodies being buried in common locations in the city, this story isn’t for you. Bone fragments that were found during construction in Washington Square Park were removed during construction will be reinterred at the park. Washington Square Park was once a potter’s field, a common mass grave, and there’s an estimated 20,000 who were buried there. (Downtown Express)

Everyone loves a sale, except when it comes to real estate. It’s counter-intuitive, but the numbers show that price cuts on homes in NYC don’t work in the same fashion as they do at Old Navy. (Street Easy)

If you’re looking for your first home to purchase, congrats, NYC is among the country’s worst places to buy your first home thanks to metrics like friendliness to first-time buyers, affordability, real estate taxes, and crime. (Patch)

8 no car needed day trips away from the city. (NY Times)

Take a look at the first section of Shirley Chisholm State Park that recently opened. (Untapped Cities)

You can live like a convicted felon! Two of Paul Manafort’s homes are for sale as he sits in jail for seven-and-a-half years. (Street Easy)

So, uh, maybe in 2019 it’s time for Big Gay Ice Cream to change the name of their “Salty Pimp” ice cream? (Eater)

The mayor is calling for more transparency and oversight surrounding taxi medallions after a 45-day review of what’s lead to the financial crisis in the taxi industry. Medallion owners and a portion of the city council were calling for a bailout, but the mayor’s plan falls short of including one. (Gothamist)

The Wing is expanding its women-only coworking empire with an additional outpost in Williamsburg and another in Bryant Park. (Curbed)

The mayor’s plan to close Rikers, explained. (Curbed)

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams isn’t having it, asking the city to reduce the size of the detention complex planned for Atlantic Avenue to 900 beds from 1,150. Adams also requesting for more health services in jails to reduce recidivism. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you never want your Stranger Things experience to end, Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein are performing music from the show in October at Brooklyn Steel. Tickets go on sale this Friday. (BrooklynVegan)

Has summer finally made the city feral? A New Jersey man crashed his car into a blockade near a federal building downtown claiming he had a bomb in his car. The bomb squad determined he did not. (Gothamist)

A woman was stabbed to death at the Sutter Avenue-Rutland Road 3 train station on Monday night. Someone was taken into custody, but no charges were files at publication. (amNY)

A woman was stabbed in the Gowanus Whole Foods parking lot on Monday night. A suspect, Rodney Robinson, was arrested and charged. The victim was treated at a nearby hospital. (Gothamist)

One of the city’s go-to spots for French pastries, Arcade Bakery, will be closing. Roger Gural cites rheumatoid arthritis as the reason he’s closing. (Eater)

Roger Gural’s and Karen Bornarth’s recipe for croissants. With 33 steps, it’s probably easier to experience them yourself at the bakery. (Serious Eats)

The NYPD wasted no time towing cars away from the newly demapped area of Willets Point, freeing up the area for redevelopment. (QNS)

It’s an alternative community art space that’s in the location of a former taxi cab garage. No, this one’s no in Bushwick, it’s in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

There are 114 uncounted votes in the Katz/Cabán primary that were rejected for errors by poll workers. The current vote separation is 16 and are hundreds of ballots that were rejected and with such a slim lead, each one will become a legal fight of its own. (The Indypendent)

Watch a time-lapse of the installation of Phenomenal Nature—Mrinalini Mukherjee at the Met Breuer. (Viewing NYC)

The BQE rehab panel won’t accept any new concepts and have hinted that they will be suggesting a less severe plan than the ones that would require the removal of the Brooklyn Promenade. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here comes DragCon. (amNY)

How to watch today’s U.S. Women’s National Team’s parade, which starts at 9:30 this morning. (Curbed)

Some Nike subway ads featuring Megan Rapinoe were vandalized in what the NYPD says is a potential hate crime. (amNY)

When the parade is all over, 350 sanitation workers and 19 trucks will begin their job of cleaning up the revelry. (amNY)

Pre-foreclosures are up 43% in the city, with the largest number of them coming from East New York. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The MTA is adding some F express trains in Brooklyn to the morning and evening commutes in an attempt to shave some commuting times down. (amNY)

9 great theater district restaurants for before or after a show. (NY Times)

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