The Briefly for December 4, 2019 – The “Another Reason Not to Eat Sushi From Walgreens” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Mayor de Blasio says a new stupid thing, the most popular dog names in the city, a french fry shortage is on the horizon, the Rock Center tree, and more.

The city won’t reveal its master plan for the Sunnyside Yards at a traditional town hall meeting, instead favoring a digital town hall, requiring participants to register in advance. Does the EDC expect a massive turnout and couldn’t find an appropriate space or are they trying to suppress opposition to their plan? (Michael Dorgan and Christian Murray for LIC Post)

If you’re the Governors Ball-going type, tickets are available for presale and they’re dropping hints about the lineup on Instagram. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

There’s a recall of ready-to-eat sushi, salads, and spring rolls from Trader Joe’s and Walgreens due to a contamination of Listeria. Trader Joe’s has reported no illnesses and if you have contaminated food you can bring it back for a refund. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Is Hurricane Dorian going to cause a french fry shortage? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A cargo delivery bike pilot program will be announced today with Amazon, DHL, and Whole Foods among its participants. The bikes look to be part truck and part bike, but will take up a much smaller footprint in regards to carbon and parking. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

More info on the cargo bikes: They’ll be big, but also pedal assisted, allowed in commercial loading spaces, and will be concentrated from 60th to the Battery. (Winnie Hu and Matthew Hang for NY Times)

The process to make Rikers Island a public space kicked off this week to make way for the jail’s closing in 2026. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall is getting a $550 million remodel. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

Has Mayor de Blasio’s control over the city’s schools been effective? The state Assembly will hold a hearing on the 16th. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s coming to Off-Broadway this December. (Matt Windman for amNewYork)

Vending machines like the CVS machines in Union Square and Chambers St station is both a new and nearly 120 year old idea. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A holiday tipping guide: How much to tip your doorman, super, porter, and more. (Brick Underground)

New York spends the most per student than any other state in the country and has the 13th lowest graduation rate. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Quickly: What’s the different between hemp and marijuana? The Brooklyn District Attorney’s office doesn’t know either. Earlier this year they boasted about stopping 106 pounds of marijuana from hitting the streets, but it was hemp, and they arrested Oren Levy from Green Angel CBD under the same assumption. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’ll be easier to prove tenant harassment from landlords thanks to new bills signed into law by Governor Cuomo. The laws expand the definition of harassment, remove the requirement that tenants prove they’ve been physically hurt by their landlords, and increases punishment for landlords who try to force out rent-regulated tenants. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 Rockefeller enter Christmas tree. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

New Yorkers pride themselves on knowing the best alternatives. The best delis that aren’t Katz, the best pizza in DUMBO that isn’t from Grimaldi’s, the best food that isn’t outside your neighborhood, etc. Here are 20 Christmas trees that aren’t in Rockefeller Center. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A new public light installation at Brookfield Place called Light Up Luminaries creates a canopy of multi-colored, lit up cubes suspended from the ceiling with a “show” every hour. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

Lord & Taylor is returning to the city for two weeks in December in the form of a 2,400 square foot pop-up shop in Soho, a far cry from their 676,000 square foot Fifth Avenue flagship location that was shuttered at the beginning of the year. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

The NYPD has been shooting surveillance films of “individuals and enemies of the state” for decades and thanks to the Handschu agreement, over a hundred hours of digitized footage from the 1960s through the 1980s is available through the Department of Records & Information Services. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The laws passed on Tuesday are only the start of what advocates hope will be a fruitful 2020 session when it comes to rent reforms. Multiple bills addressing evictions, tenant protections and housing stability are still in-process in Albany. (Mark Hallum for amNewyork)

The mayor is venturing towards full-on idiot mode with every passing day. When asked if the NYPD should be allowed to publicly display Thin Blue Line flags on NYPD property, the mayor said “There’s a lot of Photoshop in this world, so we’ll see.” The Thin Blue Line flag has been adopted by neo-Nazis and white supremacists in response to the Black Lives Matter movement. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

40 inexpensive dining destinations. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New Yorkers speak 637 languages, and the Endangered Language Alliance has mapped them all. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Let’s start with the obvious, we did not arrest Wolverine.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

How much did your school’s PTA bring in last year? (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

The most popular dog names in the city and Max and Bella. You’ve gotta step up your dog naming game. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden is offering free admission Tuesday to Friday, noon to 4:30pm. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

At least five Rikers Island correction officers have been suspended as investigators examine their failure to stop an 18-year-old detainee’s suicide attempt. (Ed Shanahan and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

Where to go when you’ve eaten everywhere in Williamsburg. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for November 18, 2019 – The “Curiously Timed Stop & Frisk Change of Heart by Bloomberg” Edition

De Blasio opposes commercial rent control, the Lizzo of scones in Prospect Heights, Cuomo goes after the Proud Boys, a $350 axe, and more in today’s Daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway disruptions are taking large chunks of the 4, 6, 7, A, D, E, L, and Q lines out of service. (Subway Weekender)

Mayor Bloomberg is “sorry” for supporting stop-and-frisk and the trust he lost from supporting it still bothers him. He has had a very opportune change of heart that timed coincidentally alongside his future-failed presidential run. (HuffPost)

Mayor Bloomberg marketed stop-and-frisk as a way to reduce crime by deterring it before it happened. Instead it was a policy of indirect racial profiling of young black and Latino and was used in an unconstitutional manner. (NY Times)

It was not lost on anyone that a majority of the families first in line for a recent open house were white and wealthy. They were some of the 500 parents paying $200 for a newsletter that gives them the advantage when it comes to high school tours and open houses. (NY Times)

Meet Ashley James, the Guggenheim’s first full-time black curator. (NY Times)

Is anyone surprised to find Mayor de Blasio siding with the real estate industry when it comes to commercial rent control? (Gothamist)

A look at the violent history of Randy Santos, the man arrested for killing four homeless men in Chinatown, and claims he remembers nothing from the night he was found with a bloody metal bar in hand and recorded on video making the attacks. (NY Times)

A look at Decolonize This Place, the activist group behind the viral videos of the NYPD arresting churro ladies and teens in the subways. (NY Times)

Today starts an official effort by City Council staffers to unionize over pay disparities, long hours, and low wages. (Politico)

Congestion pricing goes into effect in January of 2021, which isn’t a lot of time for the MTA’s board to get moving on getting the details of the program together. (Streetsblog)

“Crawl back into your hole, Bigot Boys — there’s no place for hate in our state.” Governor Cuomo may not be the best with insulting nicknames, but it’s good to see him telling the neo-fascist group the Proud Boys to go to hell on behalf of all New Yorkers. (amNewYork)

Of the city’s $20 billion in contracts to private businesses, only 4.9% of them went to minority- or women-owned businesses, which seems like an insanely low number. (amNewYork)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health is relatively tame, but still unnerving. (Patch)

Three people were convicted of manslaughter in the 2015 East Village building explosion that killed two men and triggered by an illegally installed gas line. (amNewYork)

The head of the state’s Committee on Open Government, Bob Freeman, committed a series of inappropriate touching and sexual harassment according to a report from the state’s inspector general. He was fired in June. (Gothamist)

What the hell is anyone in New York City going to do with a $350 axe? No matter, now you can buy one in Williamsburg. (Bedford + Bowery)

Getting real-estate developers to create low-income housing was a fight, getting them to remove “poor doors” was a fight, and getting them to treat all their tenants equally is just as much a fight. (Gothamist)

15 great Caribbean restaurants around the city. (Eater)

An extension of LaGuardia Airport? A solar farm? Homes? Let the speculation on what replaces Rikers Island begin! (NY Times)

Brooklyn Bazaar is closing at the end of the month and is having a liquidation sale. (Brooklyn Vegan)

This review of MeMe’s Diner in Prospect Heights compares its pretzel scone to Lizzo, so take that as high praise. (Grub Street)

Maya Lin’s Eclipsed Time hung from the ceiling in Penn Station for 25 years and while I’ve lived in or near the the city for 100% of that time, I never once noticed it while making my way around the dreadful station. It’s been disassembled and stored off-site while renovations continue, perhaps one day to be noticed and appreciated. (Untapped New York)

Photos: The Penn Station renovations have uncovered some pieces of the original station, the Guastavino tiles and vaulted ceilings of a passageway that was sealed up in the 80s. (Gothamist)

Things are not going great in the contract talks between the MTA and transit union workers. No talks of a strike like in 2005 just yet, even if a strike is technically illegal. (amNewYork)

A guide to NYC’s casual Italian restaurants. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for October 30, 2019 – The “Would You Like A Cocktail For Your Subway Ride?” Edition

Pete Wells drops zero stars on Peter Luger, Elizabeth Warren endorses Jumaane Williams, the 4/5/6 gets a speed increase, stealing an ATM, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Sections of the 4, 5, and 6 lines have had speed increases north of Canal Street that will go into effect this Friday. (amNewYork)

A duplex with a rooftop pool in Flatiron, only $30 million. (Curbed)

Video: Watch someone try to do a wheelie across the entire Brooklyn Bridge during rush hour. (r/nyc)

F&F Pizzeria gets high marks from Ryan Sutton at Eater, comparing the pizza to Scarr’s and Paulie Gee’s. (Eater)

Some people try to steal money from ATMs, others just steal the whole ATM. (Gothamist)

9 best dog breeds for NYC apartments. The real answer is to adopt a dog from a shelter. (6sqft)

Before phones or even telegraphs, fire watchtowers overlooked the city. Designated a landmark in 1967, the Harlem Fire Watchtower is the last of its kind in the city and its five-year restoration is complete. (Untapped Cities)

For a brief time in 1962, there was a bar on the subway, along with flowers, carpeting, draperies, and pastel lighting. Cheers to an awful idea! (Gothamist)

It’s official: Peter Luger is dead. ZERO stars from Pete Wells. (NY Times)

Let the Peter Luger opinions commence! (Eater)

Industry City submitted its expansion plans to the city. The approval process is seven months long and is still in question as Councilmember Carlos Menchaca hasn’t given the plan his thumbs up. (Kings County Politics)

As the temperatures dip, it’s important to know your rights as a renter when it comes to heat and hot water. (StreetEasy)

Ahead of a possible rezoning, the Landmarks Preservation Commission designated five Gowanus buildings as historic. (Brownstoner)

The minimum-wage increase in New York has lead to revenue and employment increases in restaurants, according to a study by the National Employment Law Project. The job growth is stronger than 12 other cities without minimum-wage increases. (Grub Street)

Read hero Kelly Bachman’s piece in the Times, explaining why she spoke up calling out Harvey Weinstein in the crowd at a show. (NY Times)

The population of Rikers Island is down, but reports of officers using force is at its highest since a federal monitor was installed four years ago. (Gothamist)

Rikers is supposed to close in 2026, but Governor Cuomo has his doubts. (amNewYork)

Say hello to the spookiest house in all of Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

Elizabeth Warren endorsed Jumaane Williams for reelection as public advocate. This is your daily reminder that early voting is now available. (Politico)

The Museum of Food and Drink is in Williamsburg, which feels right. (Atlas Obscura)

Housing Works employees walked off the job for an hour to demand better pay and working conditions and in an effort to have their efforts to form a union recognized. (Gothamist)

Why hasn’t the MTA hired additional workers to clean the subways? Are clean subways not as important as The transit union’s $500 contest for the filthiest subway car has yielded some nasty results. (Patch)