The Briefly for September 18, 2019 – The “Is Astoria the Coolest Neighborhood in the City?” Edition

How to make congestion pricing work, National Grid continues to hold customers’ service hostage, everyone hates the new license plates, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Elizabeth Warren hit Washington Square Park on Monday night to give a presidential speech on corruption. (NY Times)

Kopitiam is the only restaurant in the city to be on Bon Appétit’s 10 Best New Restaurants in America list. (Grub Street)

Time Out put together a list of the 50 coolest neighborhoods to visit in the world. On the list? Astoria. Here are three spots in Astoria to visit.(Time Out)

How will congestion pricing pay for the MTA’s 2020-2024 capital plan? A flat fee of $6.62 that could go up to $9.18 during the day and $3.06 at night and with no exceptions. (Gothamist)

Uber and Lyft drivers are showing their true power over the city with a protest against Uber and Lyft’s non-compliance with the state’s minimum wage laws by driving slowly in packs down some of the city’s busiest roads like FDR Drive and the Brooklyn Bridge. (Gothamist)

If you don’t have $11 million on hand, you can still see what an 11-room residence looks like in the Dakota on West 72nd Street. (6sqft)

The Department of Transportation is installing 50 public charging stations for electric vehicles across the city with each station being able to charge two vehicles. (Jackson Heights Post)

Six places to go apple picking near the city without a car. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“I am unequivocally against, and will never, ever, allow Industry City to move forward with a rezoning proposal through ULURP in the form that they submitted to the City Planning Commission in February earlier this year.” – City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca (Curbed)

Turns out 60% of voters polled are opposed to the new rule to replace license plates over ten years old. 75% of voters polled oppose the $25 fee for the newly designed plates. (Patch)

Donald Trump’s childhood home is up for auction in Queens. You’ve got until November 14 to bid. (Curbed)

National Grid continues to hold customers’ gas service hostage in protest of the state’s rejection of the billion-dollar Williams Pipeline that would terminate in the Rockaways over concerns it could contaminate the New York Harbor. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here are the views from the top of the city’s tallest residential building. (Curbed)

Is Sunnyside Yards the next Hudson Yards? (Greenpointers)

A food tour of Little Italy’s Feast of San Gennaro. (6sqft)

Rates of violence in Rikers Island is up across the board, including violence between inmates, inmates assaults against staff, use of force against prisoners, and use of force against adolescent inmates. (Politico)

The ten oldest and intact cemeteries in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The city has spent $673 million on NYC Ferry but hasn’t spent a dime on Citi Bikes. NYC Ferry averages 17,842 riders per day, Citi Bike recently hit a new record of 91,529 trips on Thursday, September 5. (Streetsblog)

Here’s who over 100 people will be crawling down 1.5 miles on Manhattan’s streets this weekend. (Untapped Cities)

26 of the Upper East Side’s best bars and resaurants. (Eater)

thanks to reader The Unisphere from Lindsey for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for August 26, 2019 – The “This Comes With A $10k Toilet” Edition

The US Open owes $300,000 in rent, Corey johnson writes for food access, New York’s red flag gun law goes into place, new restaurant openings and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Monday means another week of late-night subway changes and disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Queens Public Library’s Hunters Point branch is opening on September 24, after 4 years of construction. (Curbed)

All the big tech companies in the city, mapped. (The Real Deal)

Would you expect anything less than a $10,000 toilet in a $29 million home? (Architectural Digest)

The U.S. Open generates more than $750 million per year in “direct economic impact” to New York City and employs over 7,000 people each, but it also owes the city $300,000 in rent. (amNY)

Welcome to the weirdest office in the city. (Untapped Cities)

New York’s “red flag” gun bill went into effect over the weekend, which allows removal of their guns if a family member, law enforcement officer or educator successfully petitions the court. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Pacific Park, which was previously named Atlantic Yards, is the epicenter of the latest city vs state battle. The state gave approval for a massive underground gym to be added to the development and local officials are outraged that no concessions were made, especially since the developers are already behind in their commitment to creating affordable housing. (Brooklyn Paper)

Via for Schools will give parents and students the ability to track their bus’ locations in realtime. Last year thousands of kids experiencing multi-hour bus rides home from school. (Gothamist)

A federal appeals court upheld a rule that bans for-hire vehicles like Uber and Lyfts from having ads inside and on top of the vehicle.

New York’s license plates are changing, but the way they’re made will not be. License plates are made by prisoners earning $0.65/hour at the Auburn Correctional Facility. (Gothamist)

There have been no new measles cases reported in August and with the number stopped at 654, this may signal the end fo the measles outbreak that started in September 2018. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Department of Corrections at Rikers Island cannot legally put an 18 – 21-year-old in solitary confinement, but that doesn’t mean they haven’t found a new form of extreme isolation, this one without any restrictions. (Gothamist)

The Spotted Pig has been in trouble since owner Ken Friedman was accused of groping his female staffers and other sexual misconduct. Foot traffic is down because a declining number of people want to support a business owned by that kind of monster. Now, with foot traffic and revenue down, Ken Friedman sees the writing on the wall and is open to selling. (Eater)

Here are the buildings in the city with the most elevator complaints. (Curbed)

She’s been making breakfast on the city’s streets for over 35 years. Meet the woman behind Mama Jo’s Breakfast Cart and self-proclaimed oldest street vendor in New York City, Mama Jo. (Viewing NYC)

You may not be invited over to Meryl Streep’s townhouse, but you can see what it looks like on the inside through this $18.25 million real estate listing. (Curbed)

It’s late August and someone on the corner of First Ave and third Street just put their Christmas tree on the curb. Amazing. (EV Grieve)

Photos from the Official Animal Rights March. (EV Grieve)

6 ways to celebrate National Dog Day in New York City. (amNY)

Be careful with your children and dogs in Central Park, Prospect Park, and Morningside Park. Deadly, toxic algae blooms have been found in all three parks. The Prospect Park Dog Beach is still safe. These blooms are likely side-effects of the recent, intense rains which have been linked to climate change. (NY Times)

A look back at Mayor David Dinkins, 30 years after his historic 1989 election to become the first black mayor of New York City. (Gotham Gazette)

Corey Johnson’s latest op-ed argues that access to adequate, nutritious food is a human right. (Chelsea Now)

7 new restaurant openings. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to Leah Bassity for today’s featured image.

The Briefly for August 13, 2019 – The “Polling at 0.11% and Not Giving Up” Edition

Corey Johnson opposes the 14th St busway, a Keith Haring work is getting restored, how much can a roommate save you, the history of Gotham, and more in today’s daily NY news digest.

Get ready for some heavy patches of rain today and through tomorrow morning. Good news, it will be clear for John Trivialta at Parklife on Wednesday night! (Patch)

After 100 years of business on the Bowery, Faerman Cash Register Co. has closed its doors for the last time. It’s not high rent that’s pushing them out, it’s real estate taxes. As a result, the family is putting the building up for sale. (Untapped Cities)

Never a person who learns from failure, the mayor says he plans on campaigning even when he doesn’t qualify for the third set of Democratic primary debates in September. The mayor received 23 out of about 20,000 votes in the Iowa “Corn Poll” last week. (Politico)

A video surfaced of the horrific car crash on Coney Island Avenue in Midwood that resulted in the killing of Park Slope’s Jose Alzorriz. This is the second death on Coney Island Avenue in a month and one of 578 crashes in the last year. The mayor was distracted from eating corn dogs and walking around Iowa while polling at 0% support long enough to give a statement. (Gothamist)

Ten secrets of Gracie Mansion, the home of the mayor when he’s actually in the city. (Untapped Cities)

Patience and Fortitude, the lions outside the New York Public Library, are going to be laser cleaned and have their cracks repaired (the cement ones). (6sqft)

Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson story “The Lightning Thief” is getting a limited run on Broadway that starts in September and runs through January. Also headed to broadway? “Diana,” a musical about Princess Diana will begin in the same theater as “The Lightning Theif” in March. (NY Times)

87 percent of NYCHA apartments went without heat or hot water at some point last winter. Believe it or not, that number represents a decrease from the previous winter. (Curbed)

Layleen Cubilette-Polanco’s family is suing the city for placing her in solitary confinement when her medical conditions should have forbidden the Department of Corrections from placing her there. (Patch)

We are a month away from the 25th anniversary of ‘Friends’ dominating the city, so the release of a Central Perk LEGO set shouldn’t be a surprise. (6sqft)

Should you move to New York City? Probably not. (Curbed)

The city’s annual topless parade is August 25, one day before Women’s Equality Day, which starts on W 58th and Eighth Ave and continues to Bryant Park. (amNY)

Keith Haring’s “Crack is Wack” on Harlem River Drive in East Harlem is being restored. (6sqft)

“When you see someone being ableist to you or someone else, don’t ignore it, correct it. And for the record, if you see a complete stranger who is also differently-abled, it’s not weird to say “hi.” In a world full of abled body people it’s nice to know that there is someone just like us.” -Sasha Bogen, 2019 graduate of Achievement First Brooklyn High School (Kings County Politics)

The NYPD admitted it subpoenas Google and uses location data collected from Google Maps and other Google applications in order to locate suspects or witnesses. (Gothamist)

Veggie Castle is expanding into Brooklyn. (Time Out)

Arthur Schwartz is the public face of the 14th St busway opposition and protests are scheduled on Wednesday outside of his W. 12th St home. (The Villager)

Corey Johnson, who has regularly stated he wants to break the city’s car culture came out in opposition of the 14th St busway. (amNY)

Roommates in NYC. Can having one save you money? How much can they save you? Let’s find out. (Curbed)

Where did the “Gotham” nickname come from? It’s an insult lobbed at the city by Washington Irving of “Sleepy Hollow” and “Rip Van Winkle” fame. (StreetEasy)

The mayor is questioning the circumstances surrounding Jeffrey Epstein’s suicide. (NY Times)

Should government-run and -affiliated pension funds divest from fossil fuel company stock? A look at the politicians pro and anti divestment. (Gotham Gazette)

After her defeat in the Queens DA primary, what’s next for Tiffany Cabán? (NY Times)

Prescriptions for free fruits and vegetables? Yes, as apart of the Pharmacy to farm program. (Huff Post)

Williamsburg’s L’industrie Pizzeria sits atop Eat This, Not That’s list of the best pizza in the state of New York. (Patch)

The best new restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)