The Briefly for July 11, 2019 – The “Poison Ivy is Growing All Over the City” Edition

Photos and highlights from the USWNT’s ticker-tape parade, Citi Bike is failing NYers of color and the poor, WORD’s summer reading list, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Here’s an overview of where the Queens DA race is at the moment. (amNY)

The governor has a bill on his desk that can end the Cabán/Katz election lawsuit. Why hasn’t he signed it? (NY Times)

The state passed rent reform, but that’s no reason to let your guard down. Here are four new ways that landlords will try to raise your rent. (Gothamist)

The city started to make good on a promise made 15 years ago to bring a park to Downtown Brooklyn. The first portion of Willoughby Square Park is open to the public on the corner of Gold and Duffield. (Curbed)

Can you identify poison ivy? No? Here’s a primer, since apparently, it grows all over the city. (Gothamist)

The oldest 13 restaurants in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

Adda, Atomix, and Kopitiam are now on Eater’s best new restaurants in America list. (Eater)

Photos from the World Cup USWNT Parade. (amNY)

Team captain Megan Rapinoe’s speech was full of hope and ended with a truism: “New York City, you’re the motherfucking best!” (Huff Post)

The glorious signs at the parade. (Huff Post)

If you’ve still got soccer fever, here’s a list of new or soon-to-be-built soccer fields across the city. (Localize Labs)

A history of ticker-tape parades. (6sqft)

RIP Michael Seidenberg, owner of Brazenhead Books, an Upper West Side speakeasy bookstore that held late-night salons. (Untapped Cities)

Congrats are in store to the first Trailblazers Awards from the Brooklyn Cannabiz Collective, honoring people of color who are pioneers in the cannabis industry. (Brooklyn Paper)

What’s on your summer reading list? Here’s an offering from WORD Bookstore. (Brooklyn Based)

The city announced a decrease in the size of the community jails planned as a replacement for Rikers Island. (amNY)

Activists disrupted the meetings to shout down Deputy Director of the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice Dana Kaplan’s testimony. (Patch)

MAMACHA café was known for it’s CBD infused drinks, snacks, and soft-serve ice cream. Unsurprisingly, it closed the same day the city’s CBD-food and drink ban was put into place. (Bedford + Bowery)

A new contract agreement between pre-K teachers and the city will bring them one step closer to pay parity with the rest of the city’s teachers, bumping up the salaries of some Community Based Organization (CBO) teachers by $20,000. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Dave Chappelle is Dave Chappelle, even when he’s on Broadway. Of course, he’s gonna stir up some controversy. (BrooklynVegan)

A new report shows that Citi Bike is failing to include New Yorkers of color and the poor. The median household income of people who lives close to a Citi Bike dock is $90,400, while the median household income of someone is $54,700. The report calls for Citi Bike to expand into 11 specific neighborhoods with “high social vulnerability.” (Curbed)

Camp Junior, named for Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, is open this summer after a two-year renovation. The camp is open for 9-to-13-year-olds from neighborhoods in the Bronx with a risk of gang activity. (Patch)

Dean & Deluca owes small businesses hundreds of thousands of dollars for providing the chain with cookies, bread, pastries, and etc and will be closing stores in an attempt to stay in business. (NY Times)

This year’s Summer Streets dates have been announced. Get ready to take over Park Ave on three Sundays in August. (Viewing NYC)

The Studio Museum in Harlem’s artist-in-residence program has selected this year’s artists. E, Jane, Elliot Reed, and Naudline Pierre. The group show from the previous cohort is up at MoMA PS1, which will also host next year’s edition. (NY Times)

How to spend a day in the Rockaways. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for April 5, 2019 – The “Even the Raccoons Are Moving to Manhattan” Edition

This weekend’s subway changes, no one can agree on how to fix the subways, sales tax for online purchases is coming to New York, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you’re going to Wrestlemania and all the Wrestlemania adjacent events this weekend, you’ll want to know what fresh hell the subways will be over the weekend. (Subway Changes)

How many luxury condos in the city are “ghost apartments?” (The Real Deal)

There’s a private island between Hart and City Island’s, purchased by Alex Schilbi in 2011 for $176,000. Now he wants to turn it into a yoga, canoeing, and fishing retreat. (Welcome2TheBronx)

How the hell did a raccoon wind up in the 14th Street subway station? (Gothamist)

The 13 most anticipated restaurant openings of spring 2019. (Eater)

Sales taxes are coming to your online purchases in June. Another day, another tax. (NY Post)

How’s your Valyrian? Shake Shack has two Game of Thrones items on the menu, but you’ll have to order them in the George R. R. Martin fantasy language. (Gothamist)

A badly burnt body found in a Staten Island storage unit is believed to be missing teacher Jeanine Cammarata, who has been missing since Tuesday. (Gothamist)

You’re damn right Ben Stiller gives up his seat on the subway for others. (Viewing NYC)

Mark it on your calendars, Buffalo Exchanges $1 sale is on Earth Day, April 20. The proceeds will be donated to the Humane Society’s Animal Rescue Team. I’m not saying you should get super high and buy a bunch of weird clothes, but I’m also not not saying that. (Time Out)

The city just made it a little easier to search for affordable housing. Actually getting it is another story. (Curbed)

Watch Adam Platt, New York Magazine‘s restaurant critic, on his hunt for the perfect croissant. (New York Magazine)

10 best new hotels opening in NYC this year. (Curbed)

The mayor was trying to hide who was hosting his Boston fundraiser. The New York Times found out anyway. (NY Times)

Yeah, these new city jails are gonna be big, but the city wants you to know that they aren’t taking advantage of every possible square inch they could use. (Chelsea Now)

Governor Cuomo, the new head of the MTA, and the president of the New York City Transit Authority don’t see eye to eye on how to fix the subways. Shocking. (amNY)

Here’s what you need to know about The Shed now that it’s finally open. (NY Times)

“I expect all of you to use our subways and bus systems when possible,” doesn’t sound like the MTA is “demanding” staffers take mass transit. (NY Post)

The Brooklyn Eagle’s new editorial director has some questions for you. Tell him The Briefly sent you. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“I’m a Queens boy. Only very rich people can drive into Manhattan. You have to pay the toll. You have to pay parking . . . it probably comes close to $100 a day.” Does the governor know about all the bridges that don’t have tolls or the mayor who drives in and out of Manhattan every day to go to his Park Slope gym? (NY Post)

Even as Bed-Stuy gentrifies, Sugar Hill Restaurant & Supper Club has sat at the corner of DeKalb and Nostrand for forty years and has changed with the times. (NY Times)

The 10 best parm sandwich spots in the city. A cheesy list. (Gothamist)

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The Briefly for March 28, 2019 – The “Everyone Flushes Their Dog’s Poop Down the Toilet, Right?” Edition

A bagel abomination, the NYPD fights new parking placard laws, the NYC James Beard Award finalists, no one wants to see more cops on buses, and more in today’s daily NYC news brief.

Here is an argument that Times Square is not the Gowanus Canal dining options and it is actually a good neighborhood for food. (Grub Street)

The latest bagel abomination is bagels sliced like loaves of bread instead of a sandwich. Arrest this man. (Gothamist)

The state and city’s Democrats have no love for the real estate industry. Can they successfully lobby the left to do their bidding? (The Real Deal)

The answer appears to be “yes.” The proposed pied-à-terre tax would affect 280 people, and in the face of opposition by the real estate industry, the state’s legislators have appeared to back down in favor of a transfer tax. The estimated difference in revenue is $250 million ($400 million for the transfer tax and vs $650 million for the pied-à-terre tax). A $250 million reduction for the benefit of 280 people. (Curbed)

You bring your dog’s poop home in bags and flush it down the toilet, right? Well, that’s what a deputy director at the Department of Sanitation thinks you should do. Legally, it is 100% legal to toss those poop bags in a public garbage can. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is seeking support (and signatures) in opposition of a rezoning that would cast a literal shadow over portions of the garden, causing irreparable harm to the plants. (bbg.org)

A truck driver hit and killed a cyclist in Midtown, the third driver from Approved Oil to kill a pedestrian or cyclist in two years. The driver allegedly fled the scene but was not charged with leaving the scene of a crash, which is a felony. (Gothamist)

Just when you thought a commute couldn’t get worse, a water main break caused 7th Avenue to close between 27th and 34th St. (NY Post)

NYC restaurants lost jobs (3.4%) for the first time in ten years in 2018. At the same time, the total number of restaurants increased by 2,000. (Eater)

The city’s 2019 James Beard Award finalists are in. Make your reservations while you still can. (Eater)

Time Out has some feelings about the list. (Time Out)

The city wants your feedback on these ideas for the Shirley Chisholm monument in Prospect Park. (amNY)

Yankees and vintage train fans have something to look forward to. Today’s home opener this year will be accompanied by a 102-year-old subway train bringing fans to the stadium on the 4 train. (6sqft)

Where to eat at Yankee Stadium. (Eater)

A new Grand Street Bridge will be complete by 2027. Now we just have to hope that the current span between Queens and Brooklyn will last that until then. (QNS)

Turns out no one wants cops on city buses enforcing everyone pay their fares. 75% of bus riders are people of color with a median income under $30k and advocates and politicians are see the idea of policing that specific demographic as racial profiling. (Streetsblog)

The death of one-year-old Darwin Gonzalez-Santana in December was ruled a homicide after fentanyl and heroin were found in his system. His father is not in police custody and his mother is already in custody for another offense. (NY Post)

Eight remnants of colonial NYC that you can still touch. (Untapped Cities)

For $25,000, you can dine (and attempt to influence) Governor Cuomo. Who needs campaign finance reform when it costs 19 ounces of gold to share a meal? (NY Times)

The review process for Mayor de Blasio’s Rikers Island alternative jail system is underway. (Bklyner)

Horrifically, someone fell face first onto the track of the L train in Brooklyn. Witnesses couldn’t get him off the tracks in time, but they were able to signal to the conductor to stop the train before he was run over. (Gothamist)

Mark your calendars, Fleet Week is May 22 – 28. (Gothamist)

Congestion pricing, explained. (Curbed)

If you don’t know what Williamsburg looked like in the 90s, you owe it to yourself to take a look at the neighborhood pre-hipster. (Bedford + Bowery)

The latest volley in the legal battle between the city and Ballyhoo Media, the operator of the floating LED billboards in the city’s waterways, is a lawsuit form the city with $25,000 fines for each day the city says Ballyhoo broke zoning rules. (Patch)

Mayor de Blasio said delivery workers who are caught using electric bikes won’t be directly targeted by legal action. The NYPD doesn’t care what he says. (Gothamist)

The socialite grifter’s lawyer has an interesting defense planned: She’s just like Sinatra. (NY Post)

The City Council has unlikely opposition in their quest to fight parking placard abuse: the NYPD. The city’s likely biggest abusers say that the job they’re doing is already top notch. (amNY)

TGI Friday’s, have you no shame? (NY Post)

An interview with Brittany Bond, the purveyor of Common Books, the pushcart bookstore that can be found in the Lower East Side year round. (Bowery Boogie)

A list of good places to break up with someone in public. (The Infatuation)

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