The Briefly for January 5, 2021 – The “Thresholds? We Don’t Need No Stinkin Thresholds!” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Moynihan Train Hall opens, the city is failing its vaccine rollout, the best new restaurants of 2020, NYC’s first baby of 2021, and more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 41˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

Slash came out in support of city renaming a portion of St. Marks Jimmy Webb Place. There is a change.org petition if you want to add your name in support. (Bowery Boogie)

The top new restaurants in the city in 2020 from writers, photographers, chefs, restaurateurs, entrepreneurs, and elected officials. (Eater)

Video: Walking through the new Moynihan Train Hall in Penn Station. (ActionKid)

Photos: Inside the new Moynihan Train Hall. (Sophia Chang with photos by Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Did you know that old Penn Station had a women-only waiting room? (Ephemeral New York)

Photos: The art of the new Moynihan Train Hall. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

This January marks 75 years since the shutdown of the City Hall Station. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

12 restaurants with heated outdoor dining in Queens. (Erika Adams for Eater)

There’s a new push to build a windmill farm off the shore of Sunset Park, spearheaded by Senator Charles Schumer, Public Advocate Jumaane Williams, and City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca. (Ariama C. Long for Kings County Politics)

Governor Cuomo has long said that if the city hits a 7-day 9% positivity rate for Covid-19, he would close the schools in the city. The city hit 9% and Governor Cuomo decided schools will stay open. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The more infectious UK strain of Covid-19 was found in New York state in Saratoga Springs. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The city has only used 25% of its Covid-19 vaccine allocation. The mayor announced a goal of one million vaccinations by the end of January. That’s going to be a tough task considering the city has only administered 110k vaccines as of this morning. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Coney Island History Project launched a new podcast, Coney Island Stories Podcast. If you missed the opportunity to get the sand in your shoes this year, take a dip into some history. (Coney Island History Project)

Bird Alert! A bald eagle was spotted in Central Park. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Meet the NYC queens on this season of RuPaul’s Drag Race. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD will file charges against “SoHo Karen,” who accused a Black child of stealing her phone and scratched and tackled him in the process. (Ishena Robinson for The Root)

City Sheriffs broke up three New Year’s Eve parties, including a 300 person karaoke party in Queens. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

Farewell to Sammy’s Roumanian Steakhouse, closing after 47 years, but it sounds like they have plans of reopening. (EV Grieve)

Max Rose is not running for mayor, saving himself a quick L. (NY1)

The NYPD’s 73rd Precinct tried a radical experiment for five days in December in what could be a model for the future. They removed police officers and replaced them with community members preventing minor incidents. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

10 new public art installations in NYC for January. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Public Advocate Jumaane Williams plans to appoint Cea Weaver, the campaign coordinator for Housing Justice for All, to the City Planning Commission. This would be one of thirteen seats on the commission. (Akiko Matsuda for The Real Deal)

Congrats to Ivett Rodriguez on the birth of her son Jaxel, the first baby in NYC to be born in 2021. (Robert Pozarycki for Brooklyn Paper)

Mayor de Blasio announced the there will be a special election on March 23 for the empty 11th and 15th City Council seats. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

This week is your last opportunity to own a piece of Gem Spa, the auction ends January 7. (Flaming Pablum)

Marine Park Democratic District Leader Lori Maslow resigned after a weird weekend Twitter rant against Chinese people. She’s since deleted her Twitter account. (Brian Braiker for Brooklyn Magazine)

A technical glitch that took down the NYC Department of Correction’s Inmate Lookup Service last month has left some incarcerated New Yorkers without access to their lawyers or families. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

State Senator Brian Benjamin is running for City Comptroller, the chief fiscal officer for the city, but The City has uncovered multiple phantom donations, including one from a two-year-old, to his campaign. Benjamin says that he will “return” the money. To whom? Not a great omen for someone who wants to oversee the city’s finances. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Six women have been assaulted at the Morgan Ave L Station since November. If you’re using this station, please be alert when you do. (Matt Fink for Bushwick Daily)

From the “No Sympathy” department comes this story from the Times on how difficult it is to find parking in NYC ever since car ownership soared this year. I used to live downstairs from a guy in Park Slope who never moved his car for street cleaning because, as he explained it, paying for every ticket you get because you don’t move your car is cheaper than paying for a spot in any garage in the neighborhood. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Be careful when crossing 1st Ave and 7th St, because the freshly prepared intersection is now the hole to some sinkholes. (EV Grieve)

Apartment Lust: An historic $4.4 million house in Park Slope’s historic district, complete with garage, two outdoor areas, a full bath in an unfinished basement, and four stories. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

Know a restaurant that opened in 2020? Time Out is making a list. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

Robert Sietsema’s 2020 in sandwiches. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 27-28, 2020 – The “Indoor Dining Returns, Outdoor Dining Becomes Permanent” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: 600k kids return to school this week, the mayor announces future announcements, the best new burgers in the city

Today – Low: 68˚ High: 76˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Video: In case you were wondering, the NYPD’s tactics have not changed in the face of months straight of protests throughout the city. This was the scene last night in the West Village as the NYPD swarmed protesters on 6th St after the “Celebration of Art Of Protest” in Washington Square Park (FreedomNewsTV)

The NYPD ended its training program for officers to de-escalate encounters with people in a mental health crisis. The future of the program is in limbo. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Indoor dining returns this Wednesday in NYC. Here’s how restaurants are preparing. Keep in mind, not every restaurant will be taking part. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

Outdoor dining is now permanent. Here’s everything to know about the city’s permanent outdoor dining plan. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Coronavirus anxiety and depression have hit NYC, as a new study says 44% of New Yorkers are feeling anxiety about the virus and 36% felt depressed since the start of our PAUSE. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

How will the city’s souvenir shops survive the pandemic without tourists? Maybe they won’t. (Carson Kessler for The City)

Good news for you if you’re someone who has been collecting your compost since the city’s collections stopped in March. Compost drop-off locations return to six Greenmarkets. (Tequila Minsky for The Villager)

The American Museum of Natural History fired Mark E. Siddall after the museum found that he had sexually harassed and bullied a graduate student who was doing research under his supervision. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Tourist helicopters are back to annoy city dwellers and, in a surprising twist, they’re coming from Jersey. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Next year’s city-wide elections will be ranked-choice. I’ve linked to this explainer video multiple times already, so when city officials and candidates argue that we’re not ready for a new voting system, you can tell them to go to hell. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Home sales are surging on Brooklyn. Tell that to the next person who bemoans how many people are leaving the city for the suburbs. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

Dianne Smith has a new installation titled “Styling: Black Expression, Rebellion and Joy Through Fashion” that pays tribute to Black women who shape and redefine what it means to be stylish. The location? Nordstrom at Columbus Circle. This is the first full-scale art exhibition at the location. (Roger Clark for NY1)

The MTA is set to run out of money before 2021 and will likely be forced to borrow money to survive. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

When someone vandalized the A train tracks last week, Rikien Wilder was there to clear some of the items thrown on the tracks and tackle the vandal as they tried to get away. The MTA showed their appreciation for Wilder’s heroics with a free year of subway rides. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Here’s someone trying to find the silver lining in the clouds of Century 21’s closing in Bay Ridge. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

It’s a renters market, the Times gives some advice about how to negotiate with your landlord. (Ronda Kaysen for NY Times)

On August 23, 1974, John Lennon claims he saw a UFO outside Midtown East apartment. (Dave Lifton for Ultimate Classic Rock)

The apartment that John Lennon was living in, and saw the UFO from, is now for sale for $5.5 million. It’s a 4,000 triplex and it’s also where the iconic John Lennon “New York City” photo was taken. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Maybe you’ll see your own UFOs after purchasing the apartment because UFO sightings are up in New York. At 184 sightings, we’ve already exceeded the 151 sightings total for 2019. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The asshole of the week is Heshy Tischler, who crashed a press conference about the uptick in Covid-19 cases in the Ocean Parkway Cluster without a mask and denying the existence of the virus, causing the press conference to be cut short. (Aidan Graham and Meaghan McGoldrick for amNewYork Metro)

“There’s rampant COVID denialism and misinformation abound in the community. People are not getting tested and are refusing care even when sick. This is deeply distressing.” Three men from Orthodox communities died from Covid-19 last week at Maimonides Hospital. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Bill de Blasio held a press conference announcing that he will hold future press conferences about the city’s “rebirth.” I’d argue the city’s rebirth starts on election day 2021 when we pick a new mayor. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor bowed to pressure from Upper West Siders to remove 300 homeless men from a temporary shelter. Then he took that decision back. Then he took that decision back and removing the 300 homeless New Yorkers from their temporary shelter and move them to another shelter in the Financial District in a move being called “the pinnacle of cowardliness.” Most politicians reveal their true selves once they are no longer up for re-election. I guess the mayor is showing us all who he really is. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The mayor’s pledge to close Rikers Island is falling apart. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Thanks to a federal judge’s ruling, you have until October 31 to fill out your census information. The Trump administration had tried to shorten the deadline to September 30 and the city is woefully behind on people filling it out. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

John Burns, a longtime friend of the mayor and first deputy commissioner at the Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings, resigned under fire after an investigation found he mistreated a female employee and created a hostile workplace. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Photos: A first look at Eataly’s honey-themed rooftop restaurant. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

It’s a fantastical idea: The Mandragore would use half of Roosevelt Island to build the country’s tallest building and the world’s tallest “carbon sink” that would actually reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the city and generate energy with wind turbines and solar panels. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Miles Morales: Spider-Man, coming for the PlayStation 4 and 5, uses Harlem as its setting, a rare location for a digital depiction of New York City. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

The six best new burgers in the city. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Photos: Check out the new bike-based cargo delivery vehicles you’ll be seeing around the city soon. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

What’s your subway station number? An interactive subway map that gives you a ranking as a New Yorker based on every subway station you’ve ever been to. (My score was 152, giving me the title of “NYC Lifer”) (The Cleverest)

10 great places to see on a Brooklyn Greenway bike ride. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Photos: Inside the secret train track hidden in the depths of Grand Central Terminal. (Emily Nonko for 6sqft)

Restoration work on the Empire State Building’s Art Deco spire is complete, giving the building’s “hat” its original silhouette. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The mayor announced 9,000 furloughs of managers and city employees not under union contracts. The unlucky 9,000 will be laid off for five cays between October and March. The mayor’s looking to save a billion dollars to prevent 22,000 layoffs and these furloughs will save $21 million. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Among these 9,000? The Department of Education announced furloughs for superintendents and other non-union management will be furloughed. Perfect timing as schools are reopening. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

70 staff members as IS 51 in Staten Island are in quarantine after a teacher tested positive for Covid-19. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

In a reversal of education department policy, city teachers will now be allowed to work remotely if they are teaching students who are learning from home, according to a new agreement reached Friday between the city and the teachers union. Seems weird they’d be forced to come to a school building to teach remote students, right? (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

Here’s what you need to know about K-8 students returning to schools this week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The secret patios of NYC, where you can eat and drink away from the street. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo from The Edge!

The Briefly for August 7, 2020 – The “Mess With the Bull, Get the Horns” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo gets petty, de Blasio breaks another promise, eight NYC rooftops, how to renegotiate rent, the NYPD fights the chokehold ban, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 80˚
Rain in the morning and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 71˚ High: 84˚

A guide to renegoiate your rent. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

An executive order will allow the courts to suspend eviction proceedings through September 4. It’s not a complete ban on eviction hearings, but it gives the courts leeway to suspend deadlines. (Sydney Pereira with Beth Fertig and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Do not buy a car,” says mayor who gets driven literally everywhere. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Lucky, the East Village bar that started a petition calling for Governor Cuomo to reverse his “substantial amounts of food” mandate with drink orders, had its liquor license suspended for not serving food with its drink orders. Classic petty Cuomo. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The state attorney general’s office is suing to dissolve the NRA. AG Letitia James made the announcement on Thursday. Washington DC is also suing the NRA. 148 years ago the NRA was chartered in New York, giving the state the jurisdiction over it. (Danny Hakim for NY Times)

A look at another broken promise of Bill de Blasio: release a complete history of all complaints against every officer in the NYPD and how his corporate counsel made the decision not to release anything for the time being. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

NYPD unions brought a lawsuit seeking to stop a new city law that makes it a crime for police officers to use chokeholds or kneel on a suspect’s neck or back. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

There are over 900 NYPD officers that have refused to participate in investigations into alleged misconduct, creating an immense backlog for the Civilian Complaint Review Board. Cowards. If a private citizen doesn’t want to participate in an investigation into alleged wrongdoings on their part, they don’t seem to have a choice. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Even as its population is shrinking, the use of force against inmates at Rikers Island is at an all-time high. (Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

Have you taken to indoor gardening? You’re not the only one. You might say that the hobby is… growing on New Yorkers. (Mili Godio for Bedford + Bowery)

Apartment Porn: A $3.25 million Brooklyn Heights waterfront loft. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A look at the opening of Rangoon, one of NYC’s strictly Burmese restaurants. (Sai Mokhtari for Gothamist)

Welcome to the neighborhood Any Thing, a new bar in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, whose bar features only distilled and/or supported spirits that are women-owned. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Something’s wrong in your rented apartment. Who should pay for repairs? (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

Dr. Oxiris Barbot is only the latest high profile woman of color to leave the de Blasio administration. She joins Deputy Mayors Lilliam Barrios Paoli and Herminia Palacio, mayoral aide Rachel Noerdlinger, his first Health Commissioner Dr. Mary Bassett, Children’s Services Commissioner Gladys Carrion, and NYCHA Chair Shola Olatoye. Maybe it’s time to ask the question: Does the mayor have a problem with women of color? (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The Black Tap is starting up CrazyShake deliveries on Monday. (Emily Davenport for amNewyork Metro)

Exploring NYC’s iconic works of public art. (Untapped New York)

It’s an unremarkable building in St Louis, but it once stood as one of the pavilions at the World’s Fair in 1964. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

The world’s largest bronze gorilla sculpture, titled King Nyani by Gillie and Marc Schnatter, is coming to Hudson Yards’ Bella Abzug Park. Once installed later this month, three people will be able to fit in the gorilla’s hand. The sculpture is part of an awareness campaign to raise funds for the critically endangered gorilla species. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Next week is the peak of the annual Perseid meteor shower, which you’ll be able to see on a clear night. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Hulu’s High Fidelity series, which eschewed Chicago for Brooklyn, is canceled. (Bill Pearis for BrooklyVegan)

We have anything that you’d find at a New York bodega, turned vegan,” – Jeremy Dean, owner of the newly opened Vodega in DUMBO. I know where I’m going this weekend. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Remember gyms? Governor Cuomo says you won’t see a gym open in New York anytime soon. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

That won’t stop everyone, as some gyms like BYKlyn Cycle in Park Slope (of course, it’s Park Slope) opened a pop-up outdoor spinning studio. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Everything you need to know about the NYC quarantine checkpoints. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to eat outside in Greenpoint. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

While the mayor didn’t come out and directly support a tax on the city’s mega-rich, he went as far as to say that he won’t cater the city’s policies around trying to lure them back. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

List: Recent restaurants and bars that closed, including Jack the Horse Tavern in Brooklyn Heights, 88 Lan Noodle in Chinatown, Fonda in the East Village, and more. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The MTA is expanding its program of putting cameras on buses to ticket drivers parked in bus lanes. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The 8 rooftops now open with the best views of NYC. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

There has been a years-long fight to grant Ezras Nashim, an all-female Orthodox volunteer emergency medical service and focus of the documentary 93 Queen, an ambulance license. They have been using their own vehicles to respond to emergencies and were denied a license last summer due to objections from the Hatzalah emergency medical service. Within the Orthodox community, modesty is a real issue, and women can be forced to make a choice between their modesty and a real medical emergency. That is a position that no one should have to be in. Women are not allowed to join the Borough Park chapter of Hatzalah, exacerbating the issue. (Carson Kessler for The City)

Are NYC schools ready to handle students and teachers? Here’s a better question: Do their HVAC systems work at all? (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

On its 100th birthday the Wonder Wheel stands silent. (John Freeman Gill for NY Times)

A guide to the city’s food halls that have reopened for outdoor dining, takeout, and delivery. (Erika Adams for Eater)