The Briefly for March 5, 2020 – The “Are We Supposed to Be Freaking Out Yet?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Two colleges close due to COVID-19 fears, the loudest borough in the city, 60,000 children owe late library fees, 30 excellent weekday breakfasts, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 52˚
Clear throughout the day.

30 excellent spots for weekday breakfast. (Nikko Duren & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Could New York be the first state to decriminalize sex work? There’s a bill working its way through the state’s legislature that could make it happen. (Arima Long for Kings County Politics)

How many people get a sandwich named after them and how many of those people get to eat that sandwich? Experiencing the Wayne Diamond at Russo’s Mozzarella and Pasta with Wayne Diamond himself. (EV Grieve)

A New York City public school teacher who vacationed in Italy during the February winter break is set to undergo testing after experiencing possible coronavirus symptoms after spending several days last week in a classroom with children before she showed any signs of potential infection. Remain calm. (Greg B. Smith and Yoav Gonen for The City)

The person with the third confirmed coronavirus case in New York state is a student at Yeshiva University, which closed its campus temporarily in upper Manhattan. (Jen Chung and Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

How are restaurants preparing for coronavirus? Following the city’s sanitary guidelines have become more important than ever. (Hannah Howard for Grub Street)

All your coronavirus questions answered. Okay, maybe not ALL of them, but it’s a pretty comprehensive list of questions. If you’re the person people turn to with questions about it, this is a good link to send the people asking you questions. (Jen Chung and Elizabeth King for Gothamist)

New York Law School closed its Tribeca campus after a student reported contact with the New Rochelle lawyer seriously ill with novel coronavirus. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Here is how the city is stepping up its coronavirus prevention efforts. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

A brief note from City Council Speaker Corey Johnson about coronavirus. (Corey Johnson for The Brooklyn Reader)

Historic restaurant Gage & Tollner is ready to return to the city on March 15th. (Robert Simonson for NY Times)

No matter the changes, New York real estate can still be a mostly lawless place where brokers are willing to charge whatever they want for whatever they want before you get your keys. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

9 buildings in the city that have lost their landmark status. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

At the moment it’s a parking lot sitting atop the toxic leftovers of a 19th-century thermometer factory near the South Street Seaport, but it soon may be a 990-foot tall mixed use tower. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The “Ladies Burger” at Long Island Bar in Cobble Hill, a single patty option of its Long Island Burger, is dead. The name is gone, but the single patty option lives on. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

14 ways to celebrate Women’s History Month in NYC. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Andy Kessler was an early pioneer of skateboarding in Riverside Park and on the Upper West Side, and Community Board 7 will name the Riverside Skate Park in his honor when it reopens in May. (amNewYork Metro)

Buckle up, no matter where you’re sitting. A new bill is headed to Governor Cuomo’s desk that would make it mandatory for seatbelts to be worn in every seat of the car. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The story of how a living room turned into Lion’s Roar Karaoke House in East Williamsburg. (Lauren Vespoli for NY Times)

The Double Chocolate Cookie with Oat Ganache, “the greatest cookie” (Gothamist’s words, not mine), will be available in the city this month only. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

60,000 delinquent children have $15 or more of late fees at New York’s public libraries, preventing them from borrowing more books. The head librarians of New York, Queens, and Brooklyn public libraries asked the City Council to wipe out late fees for children altogether to get books back in the hands of children. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A guide to prewar vs post-war apartments. (Localize Labs)

Congrats Brooklyn, you’re the noisiest borough in the city. (Beth Dedman for amNewYork Metro)

16 exemplary Chinese soup dumplings in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thank you to reader Emily for sending in today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 24, 2019 – The “Better Off Without the City’s Attention” Edition

The MTA’s buses are going slower, the NYPD will handle “emotionally disturbed” New Yorkers differently, a case for Riverside Pak, the best tapas, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Everyone’s got a to-do list for the mayor, here’s another list of eight issues for him to deal with. (Curbed)

Congratulations are in order to Mayor de Blasio. The mayor announced a plan to speed up the city’s buses 25% and buses are running slower than this time last year. Perfection. (Patch)

Philly pizza? Yup, Philly favorite Pizzeria Beddia Will have one night in the big city on October 1. (Grub Street)

The Oculus’s roof is supposed to open on 9/11 annually, but this year it remained shut due to a leak which was caused by last year’s opening and closing. It’ll cost an additional $200,000 to fix the leak. (Curbed)

The Friars Club made the celebrity roast a common occurrence, for better or worse. Here are ten secrets of the Friars Club. (Untapped Cities)

Video: A striking video about artists and advocates’ push to make Hart Island, New York City’s public cemetery, publicly accessible. (Untapped Cities)

The city was barely ready when the new “Raise the Age” law removed 16-year-olds from the normal court system and placed them in Family Court or “Youth Part” (which is a real part of the justice system). On October 1, 17-year-olds will be moved into these parts of the system and there are doubts the courts will be able to handle it. (The City)

National Grid has frozen 2,600 applications for gas hookups in its temper tantrum over Governor Cuomo’s refusal to add a new gas pipeline to Rockaway Beach, leaving 20,000 apartments and businesses without gas. (Gothamist)

Peak fall foliage will hit the city mid-October. (6sqft)

The former Slave Theater in Bed-Stuy will become a ten-story building with residential “co-living,” hotel rooms and community space. (6sqft)

An argument that Riverside Park is the lowkey best park in the city. (Gothamist)

How much do you trust the NYPD on a scale from 1-10? According to polls, it’s at a 6.6 for the month of August. (amNY)

City Hall will reveal a plan this week for how the NYPD will deal with mentally ill New Yorkers. Over the last decade, annual calls to 911 about “emotionally disturbed people” have doubled from 97,000 to over 180,000. (The City)

The NYPD list a state Supreme Court case and after a yearlong battle will have to reveal fare evasion data, which advocates say will reveal the NYPD’s racist policing policies. (Gothamist)

Vegandale is taking over Randall’s Island Park/a> this Saturday with 150 vegan food and drink vendors. (The Villager)

Everyone has the right to be stupid, even the people stockpiling vape juice ahead of an eventual ban. (Gothamist)

If the biggest problem you have with Roberta’s is that you don’t want to go all the way to Bushwick for pizza, you’re in luck. Roberta’s will be opening a Manhattan outpost in the spring. (Eater)

A replica of Josef Albers’s “Manhattan” is back at 200 Park Avenue. The original was iconic but also hid a deadly secret behind its Formica panels, asbestos. IT was removed in 2000. (NY Times)

Watch Greta Thunberg’s address to the United Nations Climate Action Summit. (Gothamist)

Meet Katherine Walsh, who will challenge incumbent Assemblymember Félix Ortiz’s State Assembly seat representing Sunset Park and Red Hook with a focus on the environment. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

When Wayne Algenio became the king of San Gennaro by eating 38 cannoli and 54 zeppoli in six minutes, each a week apart, the last thing he was thinking about was the 10,000 calories he just consumed. Here’s a closer look at what it takes to be a king. (Bedford + Bowery)

15 top-notch tapas restaurants in NYC. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 2, 2019 – The “Delayed Subways Are Literally Killing You” Weekend Edition

A highlight of the city’s beaches, the weekend subway delays, photos of children are in the NYPD’s facial recognition database and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Welcome to August, when everyone seems to leave the city.

Lots of reduced service this week on the subways, check before you go. (Subway Weekender)

Four residential towers slated for Two Bridges, the area between the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges on the Manhattan side, was put on ice by a judge who declared the city did not have the right to bypass the usual zoning and approval process. (amNY)

There’s a piece of Broadway’s history sitting outside of 52 East 80th Street. Outside the brownstone, you’ll find a large limestone head of a Greco-Roman goddess. That head was a part of the original Zigfield Theater. (Untapped Cities)

Are subway delays deadly? In the long run, yes. The Social Science Research Council found a correlation between higher commute times and obesity and are linked to diabetes and heart conditions. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

You can take the mayor out of the city, but you can’t take the controversy away from the mayor. During this week’s debates, de Blasio was plagued with questions and protests over some of his greatest hits. (amNY)

Who is on the MTA board, which has the authority to raise prices and make service changes? If you guessed a bunch of rich, older, white suburbanites, you’d be right. The median household income for a board member is 5x MTA riders and only 26% live in the city. (6sqft)

Three men were arrested for trafficking 100,000 pounds of weed from California to Queens between 2015 and last December. (QNS)

Video: Meet Danny and Elizabeth Rossi, a father/daughter dup of disabled veterans who run hot dog carts outside the Met. Their interview highlights their infectious personalities but also the surprising black market hot dog cart business. (Viewing NYC)

The proper way to end a subway argument about etiquette is yelling, followed by one person leaving the subway car to go to the next car at the first opportunity, not stabbing two people who are asking you to move your bags. (Gothamist)

A side effect of the eventual East River Park renovation is that the blacktop area frequented by street hockey players and skaters would be turfed over to make way for the displaced East River Park’s baseball fields. The city is trying to figure out where it would move the displaced skaters and street hockey players. (Gothamist)

The MTA plans to make the 14th St station on 6th and 7th Aves fully accessible with new elevators by 2022. (6sqft)

The NYPD has quietly added photos of children and teens to their facial recognition systems, further graying an already very gray area of where artificial intelligence and policing meet. (NY Times)

The monster under the streets of Bushwick is hungry, that’s the only logical explanation for the giant sinkhole that opened up and nearly ate a car whole. (Brooklyn Paper)

The city says its lead paint problem is under control, meanwhile, over 900 classrooms for children under 6 had deteriorated, chipped, or peeling lead paint. That’s one in five classrooms. (Gothamist)

This fall the Brooklyn Bridge will go under a $328 million renovation project to work on the facades and repoint the towers. (Downtown Express)

Jesus Cepeda was killed in midtown when a driver hit him with his SUV while double parking in reverse. No arrests were made. (Gothamist)

Researchers studying trees at Green-Wood Cemetery found a nonnative beetle previously unknown to science. (NY Times)

A series of projects meant to beautify and make Downtown Brooklyn safer for pedestrians was announced by the governor on Thursdays to bring pedestrian crossings, a renovation for the Walt Whitman Library, upgrades in Commodore Barry Park, and more. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

This is one story of hundreds from migrant children separated from their parents at the border, who end up in New York City. (Gothamist)

Borough President Eric Adams called out the city’s third-party transfer program as racist and taking homes away from black and brown homeowners is intentional. (Bklyner)

The GOAT Riverside Park goat? After an online poll, Massey, a father of four was declared victorious. After a brief vacation, the goats are back to manicure the park. (Gothamist)

The top 10 hidden beaches in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

A day on City Island, which sounds like a little slice of a small New England beach town in the city. (NY Times)

Spend a day in Little Odessa, a neighborhood in complement to Brighton Beach. (amNY)

A look at the fascinating history of Coney Island’s Sea Gate community. (6sqft)

Eat your way through Coney Island. (amNY)

Today’s featured image was sent in by reader @munnybuns