The Briefly for June 12, 2019 – The “You’re A Landmark if You Like It or Not” Edition

The state’s legislature agreed to rent reforms, the best restaurants of 2019 so far, Cuomo gets serious about MTA overtime, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The state legislature agreed on a package of bills aimed at strengthening tenants rights and rent laws. The bills also would become permanent, so no more regular lobbying from the real estate industry to let the laws lapse when their expiration dates come. (NY Times)

Some of the rent reforms include ending vacancy decontrol, eliminating the ability of landlords to raise rents on vacancies, it would retain preferential rents for the life of a tenant, and dramatically limit improvement charges. (Politico)

Cool down with a look at the ice creams of Astoria. (Give Me Astoria)

The Strand Bookstore is now a city landmark and as you might expect, despite a long campaign from owner Nancy Wyden against the idea. (Gothamist)

“My friend later told me that most of the businesses in this area dealt in cash only…so guns were pretty much everywhere…in every store.” New York was a different place in the late 70s. (Bowery Boogie)

Your regular reminder that you can check the city’s beaches for too much poop (how much poop is too much?) on the internet. (Gothamist)

If you’ve wanted to live in the Waldorf Astoria (and have more money than you know what to do with), the condos will be hitting the market this fall. (Curbed)

New York is the third most fun state in the country, behind Florida and California. The thing holding it back? It’s not the ratpocalypse or the mountains of trash on the sidewalks, it’s the high costs. (Patch)

Hundreds rallied after the death of Layleen Polanco in Rikers Island last week. She was being held and her bail was set at $500. The city is looking into the case, where she was sent into solitary confinement despite a history of seizures. (Gothamist)

Catch a sneak peek at NYC’s largest rainbow “flag”. (HuffPost)

The helicopter pilot who crashed into a building on Monday was lost in the rain and fog. Investigators are looking into how the craft ended up where it did instead of an airport in New Jersey. (NY Times)

FAA officials said that Timothy McCormack did not have the proper license to be operating the helicopter in low-visibility conditions. (HuffPost)

Congressmember Carolyn Maloney wants to ban all nonessential helicopter flights from Manhattan. The city banned rooftop helicopter landings after a 1977 crash on the roof of the MetLife building. (The Villager)

In the 1977 crash, five people were killed when an idling helicopter tipped over, four were on the roof, one was on the street below. (Gothamist)

The High Line’s final section is open. The Spur is the home of the High Line Plinth, a site dedicated to a rotating series of artists. (6sqft)

Watch the complete debate for Queens DA. (NY1)

During the debate, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz was the favored punching bag of the seven candidates. (Politico)

We could be seeing the beginning of the end of the measles epidemic in Brooklyn. Everyone celebrate by making sure you’re vaccinated. (amNY)

New York state is one of three that doesn’t allow paid surrogacy, but even with a progressive legislature, it isn’t certain to be abolished. Abolishment of the prohibition has the governor’s support and a bill passed the state senate, but it is stalled in the assembly, where it has split progressive support. (NY Times)

The “Flower Flashes” by Lewis Miller Design might be the city’s most wholesome vandalism the city has ever seen. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo plans on hiring the former federal prosecutor that convicted former Speaker of the State Assembly, Sheldon Siver, to investigate a former federal prosecutor to look into the overtime issue plaguing the MTA. (Politico)

Remember that T-Mobile/Spring merger? New York is suing to block it from happening. (Patch)

Riverside Park is getting a new skate park at 108th St. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Riverside at W 108th has a history as a skatepark. The Riverside Skate Park was the first “solid” skate park in the city, originally built by NYC skateboarding pioneer Andy Kessler. This piece in the Times from 2013 shows the history of the community’s dedication to maintaining it in honor of Kessler’s vision. (NY Times)

A guide to the pizza ovens of Brooklyn, illustrated by Koren Shadmi. (NY Times)

Jon Stewart, the conscience of New Yorkers, took to Congress on Tuesday to rightfully shame our government for not fully funding the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund. (Patch)

John Jay College is being sued by students who allege the college botched sexual misconduct allegations against four professors, called “The Swamp.” (Patch)

The best restaurants of 2019 so far, according to Eater critic Robert Sietsema. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 22, 2019 – The “A Carmel Frappuccino with Two Pumps of Pesticide Please” Edition

New York state closes in on the president, Fleet Week starts, a beloved ice cream shop is getting pushed out, where to eat outside, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Every subway stop’s median rent mapped. (/r/NYC)

Beyond The Streets” is bringing the work of 150 street artists to Williamsburg this summer. (Time Out)

Turns out Starbucks might have been using an industrial pesticide in an attempt to hide its unsanitary convictions. Which Starbucks? According to a new class-action lawsuit, it’s all of them in the city. (Gothamist)

The sky is falling, but this time it’s not the ceiling on the subways. A tourist is in critical, but stable, condition after a branch from a sickly tree in Washington Square Park fell on her. (Gothamist)

Stop me if you’ve heard this story before. A minority-owned, beloved and long-standing shop in a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood is being forced to close. Scoops in Prospect-Lefferts Gardens is in the process of being evicted by its landlord after being in the neighborhood since 1984. (Bklyner)

Where to eat near the Javits Center (if you must). (Eater)

Naked Shakespeare in Prospect Park, just like the Bard intended it to be performed. (Time Out)

You’d think that after paying $53,000 a year to attend NYU you’d be able to easily get tickets to graduation. You’d be wrong. Tickets are going on the secondary market for hundreds of dollars. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is giving you an opportunity to listen to plants without having to drop acid. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The absolute worst time to leave for Memorial Day weekend will be between 4:45 and 6:45pm on Thursday, but delays will start today. (Curbed)

Your 2019 guide to city beaches. (Gothamist)

The goats who will landscape Riverside Park started their summer jobs and the photos are delightful. (Untapped Cities)

Today starts Fleet Week. Here’s what you need to know. (Patch)

The Port Authority wants your input to improve the Bus Terminal. No, you can’t say “burn it down.” (Curbed)

Ska is dead. The proof. “I love ska.” -Mayor de Blasio. (BrooklynVegan)

You have a few days to say farewell to the city’s only California Pizza Kitchen before it closes on Friday. (Eater)

There are more people in Manhattan than North and South Dakota, combined! (Viewing NYC)

David Byrne is trying to rally the mayor to restore a $59 million funding cut for cultural programs in this year’s budget. (Patch)

A great white shark continues to prowl near the city’s waters, but you can safely swim in the Long Island Sound. (NY Times)

The Daniel Pantaleo trial over the death of Eric Garner continues with multiple delays. After three hours this week, the case is taking a two-week hiatus. (Gothamist)

New York state is closing in on President Trump. A new bill will allow state prosecutors to pursue anyone granted a presidential pardon and the next up is a bill that will allow the state to release the president’s state tax returns to Congress. (NY Times)

As sea levels continue to rise, the city’s largest threat is literally all around us. (New York City News Service)

Don’t pull the emergency brakes on the subway if you’re not at a station. (NY Times)

City Council Member Helen Rosenthal is planning to introduce legislation that would create an Office on Sexual Harassment Prevention inside the mayor’s office. There was a 1993 executive order from Mayor Dinkins, but it was never put into effect. (Gotham Gazette)

77 places to eat outside. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for May 7, 2019 – The “Would You Jump in the East River to Save a Dog?” Edition

The #RethinkLinkNYC campaign, the Met Gala, the target on de Blasio’s back, the Kosciuszko Bridge is ahead of schedule, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Riad Nasr and Lee Hanson’s Frenchette in TriBeCa was awarded the James Beard award for Best New Restaurant. (NY Times)

While the good people of New York City, his friends, and anyone with common sense don’t want Mayor Bill de Blasio to run for president, he is none of those people. Even if he does make the decision, his questionable fund-raising tactics, and the subsequent investigations into them will be the first speed bump on his way to not becoming president. (NY Times)

While the Rethink LinkNYC campaign isn’t throwing bricks at the LinkNYC kiosks, it is educating pedestrians about the three cameras that are always recording and the questionable nature of who can access those images. (EV Grieve)

The trade for the LinkNYC kiosks is supposed to be revenue for the city, right? The 55-inch screens across the 1,800 kiosks will fall $34 million below projections for the first five years of the program. (Gotham Gazette)

High drama in the East River as a local hero jumped off a pier to save a dog who decided to take an unannounced swim. (Gothamist)

Photos from the 2019 Met Gala. (NY Times)

Here’s a rundown of the nine bills advocates are pushing forward in the state legislature that, when packaged together, are termed “universal rent control.” (The Indypendent)

A look at the After Hours Project, a community-based syringe exchange and harm reduction program, a social and mental health services provider, an opioid treatment facility and provides additional services as well. (Bushwick Daily)

The most beautiful places to get married in the city. (Curbed)

The city’s first new marina in fifty years will be in Brooklyn Bridge Park. The ONE˚15 marina will house over 100 boats up to 200 feet in length. (6sqft)

Housing 20,000 bees on the roof of The Shops at Fresh Meadows is, as the original headline explains “best for bees-ness“. (QNS)

Five of the most unusual places in Brooklyn. Make your own jokes. (Untapped Cities)

Add this to your nightmare file: A 22-year-old woman fell from her apartment’s roof on East 25th Street while taking photos of the skyline. She’s alive, partially because she landed in the building’s trash area. (Gothamist)

NIMBYs, they’re everywhere! Park Slopers say the city wants to “pit the working class people of this city against the homeless,” due to plans to partner with a nonprofit shelter to provide 253 apartments for homeless New Yorkers. (Brooklyn Paper)

A look back twenty years ago at Giuliani’s administration “of, for, and by white people.” (Village

The plans for four “neighborhood” jails that will replace Riker’s Island will each be reduced by at least 10% to better integrate the buildings to the neighborhoods that will be housed in. The number of inmates is currently around 7,400 but is expected to drop to 4,000 by 2027. (The City)

Manhattan and Brooklyn are among the fourth and seventh most bike-friendly places in the country, according to PropleForBikes’ second annual city ratings report. (Curbed)

One of the joys of warm weather in the city is discovering how many places use goats to cut their grass. Add Riverside Park to the list, as 24 goats will “work” through August 30 between 119th and 125th Streets. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Patch is on the allergies in the city beat, showing the next week is going to be particularly rough for those of us who feel personally attacked by the city’s flora. (Patch)

There are a lot of stories about how Louis CK is not allowing people to record any of his material without his consent, which is tragically funny on one hand, but on the other hand, do not go to see Louis CK perform comedy. This city is full of hundreds, if not thousands, of comedians. (BrooklynVegan)

Three-year-old Zoey Pereira’s death is being investigated as a homicide. Her father was seen running from a car which burst into flames, which had been chained shut with two gas canisters and a propane tank in the trunk. Her father was taken into custody for questioning. (NY Times)

Add the Macy’s Fourth of July fireworks to the list of things which aren’t coming to Long Island City. The Brooklyn Bridge was chosen as this year’s location. (LIC Post)

Farewell to the original Essex Market, which is officially closed after 79 years. (Bedford + Bowery)

The Kosciuszko Bridge’s second span will open in September, years ahead of schedule. No specific opening date was set. (amNY)

How does a street pretzel compare to an authentic German Bretzel? (Viewing NYC)

The Durst Organization is lobbying the city to add a new NYC Ferry line between Astoria and the Upper East Side. This might have to do with the seven residential towers the organization is opening in Astoria. (Curbed)

14th Street’s The Blind Pig will be closing on May 18 after the landlord imposed a 50% rent hike. The site is currently listed at $300,000/month. (EV Grieve)

From a 1970 bedroom to throwing axes, from secret rooms to Oscar Wilde, 15 unique bars in NYC. (The Infatuation)

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