The Briefly for February 4, 2020 – The “NYPD’s Very Not Nice 69 Million Dollar Cost” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The race to contain the coronavirus, Cuomo may use eminent domain to renovate Penn Station, the best new restaurants in Brooklyn and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 56˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Is this the year that Albany passes marijuana legalization or… oh god I just can’t keep doing this. It’s been over a year with this story and every stupid pun has already been made. Up in smoke. Gone in a puff. High time to blahblahblah. Bottom line, can Albany get it done? (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

While the CDC is doing the testing for coronavirus, there is a team of scientists in New York racing to help contain the outbreak. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Here’s what we know about the coronavirus in New York so far. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

New York City medical labs can’t run their own diagnostic tests for the novel coronavirus only the CDC’s offices in Atlanta can run the tests and results take 36-48 hours. Mayor de Blasio is asking to change that. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

The NYPD cost the city a very not nice nearly $69 million dollars in lawsuits in 2019. Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Reports of “subway surfing” increased in 2019, MTA figures show, though transit officials say the toll of those wild rides is likely even higher and deadlier than statistics indicate. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Things aren’t great for the real estate industry right now, but if you look at who’s running for mayor, things are looking worse. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Shaun Donovan, former Obama housing secretary and candidate for mayor, gets the NY Times treatment. (Aziz Paybarah for NY Times)

Are you one of the 1,128 New Yorkers that are in JR’s latest 53-foot mural in Domino Park? The mural is in conjunction with an exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum, titled “JR: Chronicles.” Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Everything you need to know about steam heat. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

The history of how the New York Public Library got its start downtown. (Andrew Berman for 6sqft)

Can art survive Long Island City’s gentrification? (Malique Morris for Queens Chronicle)

Just when the city was about to ban plastic bags, it seems that a loophole may allow stores to hand out plastic bags as long as they’re thicc. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

13 notable NYC projects designed by black architects. (Tanay Warerkar for Curbed)

Take a tour of Michelle Williams’s Brooklyn real estate empire. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

As a part of Governor Cuomo’s plans to redevelop Penn Station, he’ll need to find a way to acquire two full city blocks between 30th and 32nd and between Seventh and Eight Avenues. He could end up using eminent domain to get the land. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

A look at the Tenderloin neighborhood, before it was razed in 1904 to make way for the original Penn Station. (Ephemeral New York)

Speaking of Penn Station, Monday afternoon saw another commuting meltdown with only one tunnel for Amtrak and NJ Transit in operation crossing the Hudson. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 new public art installations not to miss in February. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The award for most radical stance goes to the “Students Speak Out: Cops Out of Our Schools and Subways” protest. The students in the protest are calling for the abolishment of the NYPD, a free subway system, and a fully funded and free CUNY system. (Amanda Salazar for Kings County Politics)

Williamsburg’s East River State Park will be renamed after the gay liberation movement leader Marsha P. Johnson, the first state park named in honor of an LGBTQ person. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Great Canoe in the American Museum of Natural History moved for the first time in 60 years, which was a split feat of engineering and spirituality. The canoe will be the centerpiece of a newly renovated Northwest Coast Hall in 2021. (Jennifer Vanasco for Gothamist)

Minerva Zanca, a principal in Queens, just cost the city over a million dollars for being a racist. She deliberately targeted black teachers and assistants with “racist insults and retaliation.” (Jay Connor for The Root)

PETA, who has always been on the right side of morals but displaying it in the most insufferable ways, put up a sign protest the Iditarod in Seward Park. Yes, protesting a dog sledding race in Alaska by installing a sign in front of the statue of Togo in Manhattan. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

We’ve been able to assume why, but we won’t know why Andy Byford resigned without seeing his resignation letter. Release the Byford letter, you cowards! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Baby Yoda mural at the top of the Second Ave F stop is no more, as “Gritty City Style” has taken over the wall. (EV Grieve)

The NYPD is working its hardest to create boogeymen to overturn recent bail reforms, including leaking cherry-picked stories and statistics to the press (mostly the Post and the Daily News, I’ve stopped including any stories from the Post and the Daily News’ paywall makes it difficult for me to link to regularly). Legal experts are urging caution whenever coming across an obviously sensationalized story and give the reforms a chance to work. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

80% of Bronx subway stations will have OMNY by the end of February. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The Parks Department is closing a portion of the Riverside Park bike trail for two months between 110th and 125th Streets for repairs and are offering no detour for bike riders. Bike riders, as you might imagine, are pissed. (Julianne Cuba)

An updated hit list of the best new restaurants in Brooklyn. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for October 4, 2019 – The “Should We Ban Cars in All of Manhattan?” Edition

The weekend’s subway disruptions, the flavor vape ban has been blocked in court, the hottest restaurants in Brooklyn, an idiot climbed into the lion’s enclosure at the Bronx Zoo, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Check out this weekend’s subway disruptions and scheduled closures before heading out. (Subway Weekender)

F&F Pizzeria is the city’s latest slice shop with a pedigree. (Eater)

The Hunters Point Library is finally open. (New York YIMBY)

The $41 million library has a flaw: lots of stairs and only one elevator. Not every part of the library can be reached if you can’t walk. (Gothamist)

Only 22 of Manhattan residents own cars. Is it time to ban cars? (Curbed)

The Red Hook Tavern’s burger is supposed to be New York’s best, but is it worth the two-hour wait? (Eater)

There’s an election this year and early voting starts October 26. (Gothamist)

12 historic Italian-American sites of the East Village. (6sqft)

If you’ve got $200 and a desperate need to get from downtown Manhattan to JFK in eight minutes, The 14th St Busway was in full effect on Thursday with the biggest complaints coming from Uber passengers that had to *gasp* WALK AN EXTRA BLOCK. The 18 months of the pilot program will be observed to potentially become permanent if successful. (Gothamist)

Who is this monster fishing in the Gowanus Canal? (Pardon Me For Asking)

What to do and where to eat in Carroll Gardens. (amNY)

A former aide to Robert De Niro accused the actor Thursday of sexually harassing her during her 11-year station of working for him. (Patch)

The Amazon HQ2 flop left a bad taste in Long Island City’s elected officials and was the center of conversation when discussing development in the area around the Anable Basin during a town hall this week. (LIC Post)

Six members of the “Mike’s Candyshop” alleged drug delivery service were arrested in connection with the fatal overdose of HQ Trivia co-founder Colin Kroll. (Gothamist)

72 of America’s richest billionaires live in NYC. (Patch)

After the NYPD friendly-fire killing of Officer Brian Mulkeen, all anti-crime units have been directed to undergo enhanced tactical training. (amNY)

A look at the history of Shiloh Presbyterian Church in Greenwich Village, which played a leading role in the abolitionist movement and a part of the underground railroad. (GVSHP)

+ POOL Light is an art installation in the East River, a fifty-foot glowing plus sign which is part art and part data visualization. The color changes based on the conditions of the water, giving a live water quality report. (Gothamist)

Under the Sanitation Department’s new proposed rules, any food establishment with more than one location will have to compost their food waste. (amNY)

The best restaurants over 59th St. (The Infatuation)

It’s October! Here’s everything you need to know about this year’s Greenwich Village Halloween Parade. (StreetEasy)

An idiot with a death wish climbed into the lion’s enclosure at the Bronx Zoo and had an up-close and personal experience with a male lion and managed to live to post about it on Instagram. The NYPD would like to have a few words with her. (Patch)

The flavored vape ban has been blocked by an appellate judge while the lawsuit works its way through the courts. (Patch)

The hottest restaurants in Brooklyn for October 2019. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 11, 2019 – The “The Pizza Wars of New York Are Getting Saucy” Edition

14th St will become a busway in July, the mayor’s nemesis is a 16-year-old teen, New Yorkers support ending the measles religious exemption, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The Two Bridges towers are at the center of a legal battle, centered around the developers’ attempts to work around the city council and the land use review procedures. (Curbed)

Respect to whoever was able to cover an entire Q train with graffiti extremely quickly without being caught. (@JMartinezNYC)

Welcome to Soho, or as the Times puts it, “CBD stores and face-mask pushers are going to destroy us all.” (NY Times)

The Brooklyn Pizza War of 2019 has only just begun. L&B Spumoni Gardens is opening up a DUMBO outpost mere steps from Grimaldi’s and Juliana’s. May the best slice win. (Eater)

It appears that Robert De Niro is on the verge of building a movie studio in Astoria. (QNS)

A correction from yesterday (thanks Harry!), the apartment building planned for the former Hell’s Angels clubhouse will be 22 apartments, not 22 stories. (Curbed)

Tiffani Torres is 16, a twice-caller on “Ask the Mayor” on WNYC, an activist with Teens Take Charge, and a thorn in the mayor’s side. She’s correctly criticized the mayor for his DOA presidential run distracting him from city business and has been vocal about the systemic issues facing the city’s schools. Is it too late to elect her mayor? She sat down for an interview with the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York was a different place in the late 70s. (Bowery Boogie)

Does Times Square need a 24-hour, multi-story “immersive” Krispy Kreme with a theater and, no I’m not kidding, a goddamn “glaze waterfall?” Of course it does. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s Pride Parade took over Park Slope last weekend with heavy splashes of color, celebration, politicians, and remembrance of the Stonewall Riots half a century ago. (Brooklyn Paper)

Layleen Polanco, a 27-year old transgender woman, was found dead at Rikers Island on Friday. Polanco was a member of the House of Xtravaganza (get yourself up to speed on Ball Culture) and was arrested in April for assault and possession of a controlled substance. (Patch)

The city council scheduled a hearing to look into accusations against Grubhub (who owns Seamless), as well as Uber Eats, Doordash and the like, from restaurants accusing the company of charging fees for customer calls that never resulted in orders. (Eater)

10 of the best running spots in New York City, even if I think saying the High Line is a great place to run is like saying the Brooklyn Bridge is a great place to bike. (6sqft)

A helicopter crashed into AXA Equitable Center in Midtown, killing the pilot. Have you noticed how many helicopters are constantly flying around Manhattan? Manhattan has three public heliports and this was the second crash in less than a month, but that doesn’t seem to slow down the $800 trips to the Hamptons or the new service to take people to JFK Airport. (NY Times)

“Oh, you’re a girl, I thought you were a guy,” is an auspicious way to start a job somewhere. A chef is suing Hudson Yards Spanish food hall Mercado Little Spain, claiming she was fired for being a woman. (Eater)

With the Stop Violence in the Sex Trades Act, New York has a path to become the first state to decriminalize sex work, even in the face of criticism from the governor, the mayor, and Corey Johnson. (Patch)

The NYPD are arresting turnstile jumpers. The officers have wide latitude to decide who they arrest and who they ticket, so it should become obvious very quickly that people of color will be arrested at a higher rate. In 2019 people of color represent 87% of people arrested for farebeating. exact numbers aren’t known because the NYPD is refusing to comply with a court order demanding them to disclose these numbers. (Gothamist)

The conversation about rent control has gotten so muddy and opaque it’s hard to know if this article which says that mom-and-pop landlords may decide to sell their buildings if rent reform passes, is steeped in the truth or has roots in one of the many astroturfing campaigns from larger landlords and developers. (amNY)

New Yorkers overwhelmingly support the end of religious exemptions for the measles vaccine. Overwhelming is 85%, which includes more than 80% support from the Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant populations polled. There’s a bill in the state’ legislature as you read this, but there is only a week left in the legislative session until summer recess. (Patch)

St. James Place in Bed Stuy is now Christopher “Notorious B.I.G.” Wallace Way. (amNY)

Congrats to Gothamist on their site redesign. (Gothamist)

The perfect time for a sci-fi radio show is after midnight when everything is quiet and your imagination is ripe for exploration of its dark recesses. The “Hour of the Wolf” has aired between 1am – 3am on Thursday mornings since 1972. Helmed by Jim Freund, the show has had nearly every writer of importance on the show, the first U.S. broadcast of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, and whose website was originally a collaboration with Tim Berners-Lee, the literal father of the world wide web. A living piece of broadcasting history on Atlantic Avenue. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 14th St busway will arrive on July 1, drastically changing traffic and (hopefully_ speeding up the buses. (amNY)

32 great places to eat something kind of healthy for dinner. (The Infatuation)

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