The Briefly for August 1, 2019 – The “There Are Many Reasons to Dislike Mayor de Blasio” Edition

The Governor’s strategy to stay in the news, mustard ice cream, a call for bike lanes in Long Island City and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Congrats to Queens’ Dalilah Muhammad for breaking a world record in the 400-meter hurdles. (Patch)

Sunday is Lou Reed Thai Chi Day at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch. (amNY)

It took four days of public pressure, but the mayor has finally acknowledged the Brownsville tragedy as a mass shooting. According to the mayor, he’s “come to realize it’s critical we call this what it was.” Would he have changed his mind if not for being publicly chastized about his choice of words? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“De Blasio Appealing To Rural Voters By Touting Destruction Of New York City Under His Watch.” This article from The Onion is so close to reality it’s almost not funny. (The Onion)

All of the 2020 candidates’ favorability ratings increase with the most national exposure they have, except Bill de Blasio. The mayor is the only presidential candidate with a net favorability rating that is under zero. (FiveThirtyEight)

The biggest problem with the mayor is that there are a lot of petty reasons to dislike him, from the time he maybe killed a groundhog in Staten Island to his refusal to not be driven eleven miles to work out, to just being painfully uncool, but for every petty reason there is a substantive reason like his handling of Eric Garner’s death or his multiple ethics scandals or his handling of the Amazon HQ2 situation. Who would continue to run for president despite being universally disliked and polling at virtually zero? The same kind of person that would see 75% of the city he is the mayor of doesn’t want him to run for president in the first place and do it anyway. (Vox)

The mayor is on the presidential trail claiming the city will pass a paid personal leave bill this year, but the city council is not committed to his timeline. (Gotham Gazette)

15 new public art installations not to miss this month. (Untapped Cities)

Governor Cuomo signed a bill into law that prohibits school districts to allow teachers or administrators from carrying guns in schools. To quote the governor, the answer to the nation’s school shooting problem “has never been and never will be more guns.” (NY Times)

Have you noticed a steady stream of news about the governor signing bills into law this month? It’s a strategy that Cuomo uses to stay in the news during an otherwise quiet month of the year. (Politico)

Video: What is Louise Jean Signore from the Bronx’s secret to living to 107? Never get married! (Welcome2TheBronx)

The roof of Essex Crossing houses the Essex Crossing Farm. At 10,000 square feet, it’s the largest urban farm in Manhattan and their annual goal is at least 10,000 pounds of produce a year. (Bedford + Bowery)

7 minority-owned businesses in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The mayor is still on pace to hit 300,000 new affordable housing units by 2026, but production has dropped by 22% this year. The difference from 32,344 to 25,299 can partially be attributed to a rare deal made in 2018 for 5,000 units, and not the rent reform laws passed this year, as landlord advocates have claimed. (Gothamist)

The city could do a lot with $40 million, but it’s spent that amount on misconduct lawsuits against the NYPD since January. (Gothamist)

A look at Jay Myself, a documentary which takes a look at the longtime owner of one of the city’s most enigmatic buildings. (Curbed)

City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer is calling for a Long Island City bike lane network. (LIC Post)

What has the city done to prevent cyclists from getting doored? “Basically nothing,” according to the founder of the Dutch Reach project. (Gothamist)

How to stay safe as a cyclist, and of course all drivers should know about the Dutch reach. (Brooklyn Based)

A group of luxury homeowners sued to try to stop the city from installing protected bike lanes on Central Park West. It was denied by a judge and construction has begun. (Gothamist)

An interview with Sally Tallant, the new director of the Queens Museum. (Untapped Cities)

The story of 24-year-old David Ballinger, who learned the hard way through a nearly unbelievable series of events that when it comes to finding an apartment in New York City, don’t trust anyone. (Gothamist)

City Comptroller and mayoral hopeful Scott Stringer’s latest opinion piece: We need a childcare revolution in N.Y.C. (The Villager)

Mayoral hopeful and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams’s latest opinion piece makes the appeal for the Brownsville shooting not to reduce the neighborhood to a stereotype, drawing comparisons to the president’s recent treatment of Baltimore. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Have you noticed that Amazon seems to be interested in all of New York City except Long Island City? (LICtalk)

Three Republicans in the state’s legislature want to make throwing water on police officers a felony. The Legal Aid Society called the proposed legislation “embarrassing.” (Patch)

The cause of death for Layleen Cubilette-Polanco, the transgender inmate found dead in her Rikers Island cell last month, was due to an epileptic seizure. (Gothamist)

The top 10 hidden beaches in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

A day on City Island, which sounds like a little slice of a small New England beach town in the city. (NY Times)

Spend a day in Little Odessa, a neighborhood in complement to Brighton Beach. (amNY)

A look at the fascinating history of Coney Island’s Sea Gate community. (6sqft)

A third person has drowned at Rockaway Beach this year. (amNY)

Mustard ice cream? Yeah, it’s a thing and Coolhaus is giving some away this weekend for National Mustard Day, sponsored by French’s Mustard. (Gothamist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for July 30, 2019 – The “Never-Ending DA Election is Going to Court” Edition

Where rents are rising and falling, the top binge drinking neighborhoods in Brooklyn, the governor changes pot possession laws, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Members of The Proud Boys, a hate group according to the SPLC, are headed to trial for rioting for their fights with antifa protestors from an Upper East Side event in October. They’be being charged with rioting rather than assault because the antifa members who were involved are not cooperating with the NYPD. (NY Times)

Dave Chang has a new restaurant in the South Street Seaport. Is Bar Wayō enough to make you want to go to the financial district or will the neighborhood continue to be I Am Legend after 6:00? (Grub Street)

The New York City Board of Elections unanimously certified the results of the full, manual recount in the race for the Democratic nomination for Queens District Attorney. Melinda Katz won the primary. (Gothamist)

Tiffany Cabán and Melinda Katz’s campaigns will head to court on Wednesday to continue the June 25 Democratic primary until the bitter end. (NY Times)

Brooklyn Heights/Fort Greene and Park Slope/Carroll Gardens are the current kings of Kings County binge drinking, which also happen to be the two wealthiest districts in the borough. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Is public shaming enough to get NYC to change the name of “Negro Point,” which is a real spot on Randall’s Island? (Huff Post)

A $24 million dollar offer for his four-story building in the Upper East Side, denied. The story of one man who refuses to sell out in an attempt to preserve a neighborhood he perceives to be disappearing. (NY Times)

Hail seitan! Brooklyn is getting the first fully vegan sandwich shop in Seitan’s Helper at Precious Metal. (Bushwick Daily)

In an attempt to make the waiting experience less boring, the Empire State Building has a new gallery that is part Instagram-bait and part waiting area. (amNY)

Congressperson Yvette Clark introduced a bill that would ban the use of facial recognition technology from public housing. Face, voice, fingerprint and DNA identification tech would be banned from any housing that receives federal aid. (Curbed)

What’s in a name like Stone Street, Waverly Place, or Gold St? The hidden history behind 15 street names in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The South Bronx, Concourse Village, and Brownsville are the neighborhoods with the fastest rising rents. The biggest drops were in Maspeth (post-Amazon related?) and Borough Park. (Patch)

If you don’t know the name Sam Rudy, you know his work. His 40 years as a theater publicist included recent work on shows like Hamilton and Avenue Q. The Times interviewed him as he retires to Pennsylvania. (NY Times)

The Williamsburg Bayside Oil Depot is scheduled to be demolished. What’s that? Yes, of course, there is someone arguing that they should be saved. (6sqft)

The governor signed the bill into law that changes possession of up to two ounces of pot to a violation instead of a misdemeanor, meaning you’ll be fined instead of sent to jail. It also creates a process for records of certain charges of possession to be expunged. (Patch)

When he was 26, Carmine Cataldo thought his job running the newsstand at the Brooklyn Supreme Court was temporary. 36 years later, he’s retiring. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A guide to the Rockaways. Start planning your weekend. (6sqft)

It’s not summer until the nutcracker vendors hit the beaches. Unfortunately, the NYPD is attempting to change that in Rockaway Beach. (Gothamist)

People of color were significantly underrepresented in the city’s arts organizations and city government is starting to ask them to find ways to change. (NY Times)

The president signed the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund into law, providing financial support through 2090 to those injured or developed diseases due to their work after the attacks. (amNY)

Unsurprisingly, Trump made the signing of the bill about himself, continuing his history lying and exploitation of the 9/11 attacksthe city’s 18th cyclist killed by a driver. Em was doored by a driver and sent into the street where she was hit by a truck. (Streetsblog)

After the killing of Em Samolewicz, here is the city’s most dangerous intersections. (Curbed)

A palate cleanser. Three baby ducks were rescued from a sewer drain in Park Slope after being spooked by a dog. The ducks are recovering at the Sean Casey Animal Rescue. (Gothamist)

Emily Waters is giving away her art on Instagram. Meet the artist who is trying to assuage the constant stress of life with delight. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd “identified a flawed connection between some of the sensors and protective relays” which caused the July 13 blackout in Manhattan. (amNY)

The best museums in the city. (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for July 24, 2019 – The “You Can Beat This Bus in A Walking Race” Edition

A tale of two kinds of fare evasion, an alligator on Staten Island, the Queens Night Market in Manhattan, the Goop of pot, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

City Comptroller Scott Stringer asked the MTA board to slow down their reorganizing plan, requesting that it be thoughtful, thorough, and transparent, three words that do not describe the MTA. (Streetsblog)

The Jet Ski Invasion seems to be just about as punk rock as the East River can get, and for two hours at the end of June, controlled chaos ruled the water. (NY Times)

Want to see the Department of Sanitation’s new trash bins being field-tested? If you’re near Castle Hill in the Bronx, you can keep a lookout for them. (Bronx Times)

The city’s slowest and least reliable bus is the M14A-SBS, at a blazing speed of 4.3 mph. This is the bus is feeling the effect of the petitions and legal arguments to turn 14th St into a busway. (amNY)

If you ask the CEO of the Emerald Media Group, someone who is trying to “make pot pretty” and appears to be trying position herself the Gweneth Paltrow of pot, about privilege and incarceration rates in NYC for people of color, you should expect a goopy answer. (Bushwick Daily)

Who will have the final say over the fate of the Industry City rezoning? Councilmember Carlos Menchaca. The community board will vote, which is purely advisory, the borough president will make a recommendation, but it’s only a recommendation. From there it goes to the City Planning Commission, which can approve, strike down, or make changes, and then it goes to the City Council, which will defer to the local councilmember for approval. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

More rain, more power outages. ConEd hadn’t fully restored power from its man-made power outage on Sunday before Monday’s storm knocked out thousands of more customers’ power. (Curbed)

One of the main issues that the city has been having with heavy rain is that the sewers and grates were not built with this kind of volume in mind. Monday night’s storm dumped over three inches of water, an amount we haven’t seen since 1996. If the grates are clogged, the streets can’t drain. That was the case on the Long Island Expressway near Utopia Parkway, and it would have stayed that way if not for Daphne Youree’s work to clear the grates herself. (Gothamist)

Manhattan DA Cy Vance announced last year that he would stop prosecuting subway fare evasion due to the racial bias that came along with the arrests and arrested dropped by 96%. Meanwhile, the Manhattan DA has prosecuted 100% of the people who were caught evading fares on buses, and those people happen to have disproportionately low income and are people of color. (Streetsblog)

If the New York Times is covering it, you know the trend already crested. The Gray Lady says traditional Irish sessions, a gathering where people perform traditional Irish music, are thriving. (NY Times)

If you’re received preferential rent, described as rent below the legal maximum allowed and accounts for about a quarter of all rent-stabilized apartments, your preferential rent is now your base rent and your rent increases are limited by the Rent Guideline Boards instead of your landlord’s whims. Anything above a 1.5% increase for a one-year lease (or 2.5% for a two year) is illegal. (Gothamist)

The weather-made and ConEd-made blackouts have been devastating to restaurants. It goes beyond the loss of business during the blackouts, like equipment damaged as a result of losing power, or food spoiled by a lack of power. (Eater)

The MTA hired a contractor to handle its homeless outreach in Penn Station and Grand Central Terminal. Is anyone surprised that the MTA’s pick, Bowery Residents Committee, was slacking on the jobs, reporting false data, and regularly ignored people asking for help? A report from the state’s comptroller audit shone a spotlight on the shameful performance. (amNY)

The recount rages on between Queens Borough President Melinda Katz and Public Defender Tiffany Cabán. Cabán’s campaign has spent over $70,000 on its attorneys, while Katz has spent a total of $0 because hers are being provided by the Queens Democratic Party. How does this seem remotely fair? Blame a loophole in the state’s election laws. (Gothamist)

Will the Queens Night Market retain its name when it opens an output in Manhattan? (Time Out)

Pity the real estate developer who might not “break-even” on their plan to build a 105,000 square foot underground gym at the Atlantic Yards. The plan was postponed by the site’s board of directors who are investigating why an environmental impact study was not conducted. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

They won’t be able to legally drink for another six years, but Control the Sound is already playing bars and opening for Questlove. (Bedford + Bowery)

Okay, here are some answers about drinking alcohol on the city’s beaches. Here’s a hint: don’t make it obvious if you won’t want a fine. (amNY)

How to spend 10 hours in the Rockaways. (Brooklyn Based)

The 16th cyclist to be killed by a driver on the city’s streets in 2019 was 17-year-old Alex Cordero on Castleton Ave on Staten Island. (Streetsblog)

The 17th cyclist killed by a driver was being withheld, but they were killed on McGuinness Blvd in Williamsburg. There were a total of 10 cyclists killed by drivers in 2018. (Gothamist)

An oral history of Margot Gayle, an author, city councilmember, activist, and preservationist. (GVSHP)

The Fraunces Tavern unveiled a new exhibition, celebrating the 300 years of history that the building has witnessed and been a part of/a>. (amNY)

Traffic news rarely makes it into The Briefly, but the BQE near the Brooklyn Promenade will have multiple lanes shutdown overnight every night for the next month. (Brooklyn Paper)

The president is suing New York state for its recently passed law that would allow his tax returns to be made public. (Politico)

The Bronx Zoo will be bringing back its holiday light show now that LED technology will allow the Wildlife Conservation Society to run the show without violating its core mission of conservation. (amNY)

An alligator was found in the woods of Staten Island. How the hell did it get there? (SI Live)

It’s time to up your bar game, here are the best boat bars in the city. (6sqft)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.