The Briefly for May 15, 2019 – The “Carlos Danger Is At Large” Edition

A Queens city councilmember admits to sexual harassment and keeps his job, answering Broadway’s mysteries, Pride by the numbers, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Welcome to Trump Tower, one of NYC’s least desirable luxury buildings. (Bloomberg)

The expanded Statue of Liberty museum is opening on Thursday featuring the original torch and other artifacts and exhibits highlighting the statue, island, and history. Only 20% of the people who step foot on the island visit the current museum. (amNY)

Amnesty International U.S.A. was set to sign a new lease at 88 Pine St until the new landlord said no. That landlord? The Chinese Government. (The Real Deal)

NYC Pride by the numbers on the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots. (amNY)

Carlos Danger is at large after serving 18-months in prison for sexting with a minor. (NY Times)

Uh oh. This is the start of talk of a subway strike. (NY Times)

Six historic LGBTQ sites may become NYC landmarks. (6sqft)

The trial of NYPD’s Daniel Pantaleo, accused of killing Eric Garner with an illegal choke, continued with Pantaleo’s lawyer blaming Eric Garner’s death on Eric Garner. (Gothamist)

Can a chef who’s earned a two-star Michelin rating change school lunches for the better? (NY Times)

A wine and artisanal food festival at Industry City was interrupted by anti-rezoning protest, specifically aimed at the commercialization of the industrial sector. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci is bringing his masterpiece St. Jerome Praying in the Wilderness to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. (Time Out)

Council Member Barry Grodenchik has resigned as chair of the Committee on Parks and Recreation after admitting to paying improper attention to a Council staff member, including blowing a kiss to her across a table at a meeting. Gross. (Politico)

Don’t worry, he is “deeply sorry,” and he will not be losing his job on the City Council. (Gothamist)

There was a worry that if New Jersey passed marijuana legalization that New York would have to follow quickly. New Jersey legalized electric bikes and scooters, maybe this will be the kick in the pants that New York finally needs? (Streetsblog)

Photos from inside the Whitney’s Biennial. If you make your way to the Whitney, expect protests against board member Warren Kanders, who has ties to a manufacturer of tear gas canisters used against asylum seekers at the US-Mexico border. (Gothamist)

Rockaway Beach will be fully open this summer after a $10.7 million renovation to prevent catastrophic erosion. 348,000 cubic yards of sand were added to the beach. (Curbed)

Meet Liz Thomas, the professional long-distance hiker who is about to set out on a 175-mile, 100+ park, five borough hike across NYC. (Patch)

If you’ve seen groups of people camping near Central Park for a week, it’s not a protest or a performance art piece or anything like that. BTS is coming to Summerstage. (Gothamist)

The best parks for outdoor grilling. (amNY)

Are Summer Fridays a New York thing, or does it exist everywhere? (StreetEasy)

Today is the first hearing for the proposed fur ban, which pits activists against the fur industry. If New York enacts the ban, it would be following in the footsteps of San Francisco and Los Angeles. (amNY)

Video: A tour of the most expensive neighborhood in New York City. Take a guess on what you think it is before clicking. (Eric Conover)

Congrats! NYC is one of the worst places in the country to try and start a career. (Patch)

Congratulations to City Councilmember-elect Farah Louis on her victory in the special election to fill the vacant 45th City Council district seat. Louis received 41.81% of the vote, which was enough to win. (Kings County Politics)

Answers to the six biggest questions asked on Broadway each night. (NY Times)

The Wednesday Walk: “A Saturday afternoon circuit for some fatty food, but also when you want to seem a little cultured” (GoRoam)

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The Briefly for April 22, 2019 – The “Welcome To The Three Dollar Ride Era” Edition

Andy Byford might be Andy Bye Bye, New York City goes green, how Brooklyn’s neighborhoods got their names, Girl Scout Troop 6000 sells, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend was rough for getting around via the subway and late nights this week won’t be much different with work on the 1, 2, 3, D, N, R, F, G, and L lines. (Subway Changes)

The city passed a package of bills called the Climate Mobilization Act which acts as a municipal version of a green new deal. Even by signing this into law, no one will want the mayor to run for president. (HuffPost)

RIP the $2.75 subway or bus ride. Welcome to the $3.00 era. (Patch)

The cast of MTV’s “Made in Staten Island” say the show wasn’t canceled, despite only lasting three episodes before being pulled off the air and buried underneath Giants stadium. (amNY)

Andy Byford, president of New York City Transit, might already be on his way out according to his friends. Byford and Cuomo didn’t speak from January through this month. (NY Times)

Broadway will be closed to cars from Union Square to Times Square on Earth Day, April 27. Multiple high traffic areas will be pedestrian-only for the day. (Curbed)

Real all about how Reply All’s PJ Vogt eats on his weekends, here’s your piece. Get ready for a very normal guy doing and eating very normal things. Podcasters, they’re just like us! (Grub Street)

Let’s say you were grazed by a bullet while walking on the street. Would you have the wherewithal to walk yourself to a hospital for treatment? Who has a medal for this 14-year-old girl from Fort Greene? (Pix 11)

The best spots to BYOB. (The Infatuation)

The Cross Bay Bridge, the bridge providing access to the Rockaway Penninsula, will be free (after a refund) for Queens drivers. (QNS)

The L Project officially kicks off this weekend and to help buses move faster, the MTA’s plan is to… remove bus stations from 14th St. (Bedford + Bowery)

1,500 square feet of farm in a Tribeca basement. (Viewing NYC)

Is the tamale going to be the next taco? (Eater)

The Museum of Natural History will move forward with its expansion, essentially defeating the Community United to Protect Theodore Roosevelt Park. The $383 million expansion will be built inside Theodore Roosevelt Park, which was the point of contention. The new center should be completed by 2021. (Curbed)

You know it’s spring when you hear ice cream trucks in the city. This Wednesday’s its a different kind of service that’ll be brought to you. It’s a pop-up court for city-issued summonses in East New York. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Stop blaming the victims is the message from Transportation Alternatives to the NYPD about pedestrians hit by cars, but very well could be applied across the board. (Streetsblog)

If you’ve walked by the Gowanus Yacht Club and thought it was dead, which is a seemingly annual worry, fear not. It will be open in a week or two. (Gothamist)

Need Girl Scout cookies? Troop 6000, the homeless troop, will be selling the at Kellogg’s NYC Cafe in Union Square Monday through Friday from 1-6pm. They have a goal of 60,000 boxes, so you better get buying. (amNY)

Alright Gothamist, this headline is too good. “Netflix, Much Like Your Ex, Is Moving To Bushwick” (Gothamist)

A restraining order was granted against a development that could cast a literal shadow over the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens. The restraining order will be in place pending a hearing on May 3. (Curbed)

Don’t worry, the MTA’s face-scanning technology is only meant to scare you from fare evasion. Don’t you trust the MTA with video footage of your face? (Gizmodo)

The MTA previewed the tap-based OMNY system, the stupidly named replacement for MetroCards. (ABC 7)

Two cute little dogs in a bag on the subway. Nothing more, nothing less. (@bagdogs)

The city is considering demolishing two smaller NYCHA buildings and replacing them with larger buildings in partnership with private developers. 70% would be rented to paying market rates and the rest for public housing residents. (Politico)

Photos from the Easter parade. (amNY)

Is this the smallest museum in the city? It fits inside an elevator shaft. (NY Times)

The City Council voted to bar companies from testing job applicants for marijuana. (The Root)

How each of Brooklyn’s neighborhoods got their names. (Mental Floss)

It’s a perfect storm of rain and poop. More people means more poop. More rain means more sewers needing “overflow,” which is a euphemism for when our sewers are emptied into our waters. City beaches were put on warning 49 times in 2018. Rain is predicted to increase annually through the 2050s. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Swim Guide is an app and site that gives you the current water quality for 7,000 beaches. Just a hint. (The Swim Guide)

The best rooftop bars for cocktails. (amNY)

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The Briefly for June 25, 2018 – Blackface MTA Supervisor Suspended, The Free Store on Ludlow, LGBT Deadlock, and More

The MTA official who partied in blackface is suspended (with pay), Suraj Patel is cat fishing voters, Rockaway Beach is reopening, and more.

Sunset in Prospect Lefferts Gardens
Sunset in Prospect Lefferts Gardens

New York’s primary is June 26. Vote.

There has been no substantive LGBT legislation in New York State since 2011. State Senator Brad Hoylman came forward in 2016 to point out that all LGBT bills are “dead on arrival” due to the Independent Democratic Conference. That includes bills put forward by Hoylman like surrogacy, ending the gay/trans panic defense, restoring benefits for gay veterans improving HIV-related services, and more.

Park Slope’s Ninth Street is getting updated with a new design that includes pedestrian safety features and protected bike lanes after the March 5 death of two children in a car crash.

The 30th Avenue and 36th Avenue N/W stations in Astoria are open after eight months of esthetic renovations.

Suraj Patel, who is running for Congress in NY-13 against incumbent Carolyn Maloney, is catfishing people on Tinder and in other apps to try to gain support. That’s creepy, dude.

Cynthia Nixon has had some strong takes, but calling ICE a “terrorist organization” is her hottest take.

Filming Around Town: Spike Lee and Netflix’s She’s Gotta Have It is at Spring and Wooster, Once Upon A Time in Staten Island, starring Naomi Watts, is at Bay Ridge Ave in Brooklyn, and The Kitchen, starring Melissa McCarthy, is down at Avenue U and 12th St in Brooklyn.

The city’s first “virtual” food hall is opening in Flatiron. No one knows what that means.

A little league baseball game in the East Village was delayed 45 minutes because a red-tailed hawk was eating a pigeon on the field’s backstop.

Governor Cuomo directed the state’s Health Department to prevent health insurance companies from discriminating against transgendered New Yorkers to prevent President Trump from taking away their rights.

A high-ranking MTA employee was promoted despite complaints that he showed up to a party in blackface. Metro-North supervisor Richard Ranallo is suspended indefinitely, but he’s still being paid his $246,255 salary.

The previously closed sections of Rockaway Beach are reopening on June 30 on a trial basis.

The city’s top drug prosecutor seems to be on the wrong side of the evidence when it comes to the city’s proposed safe injection sites. The city had over 1,400 deaths from overdoses in the last two years.

The free store on Ludlow is about 12 years old and still going strong.


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