The Briefly for December 4-5, 2020 – The “Where to Cry in Public” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The vaccine arrives in NYC by December 15, Marie’s Crisis reopens, the Dyker Heights lights are back (with controversy), and more

Today – Low: 45˚ High: 51˚
Rain starting in the afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 32˚ High: 46˚

Get a jump on January and learn how to run in the winter. (Jen A. Miller for NY Times)

The state’s Green Light Law, which allowed undocumented immigrants to apply for driver’s licenses, survived a federal appeals court challenge. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

12 new public art installations this month. (Untapped New York)

There’s a screenshot of the best places to cry in NYC making its way around the internet but experienced public cryers will know there was an entire Tumblr account dedicated to places to cry. (NYC Crying Guide)

Gothamist wants your help to write NYC a love letter for 2020. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Video: Did you see (and hear) the terrifying sights and sounds of the Verrazzano Bridge on Monday during the storm? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Remember that guy who experienced a living nightmare of falling 12 feet through the sidewalk into a sinkhole that was full of rats where he was trapped for 30 minutes? He’s suing. It doesn’t matter what the amount is, it isn’t enough. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Meet Charles Barry, who has been scamming subway riders for nearly 40 years and has been arrested about 160 times. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Marie’s Crisis is ready to open again on December 8 at a 25% capacity, allowing only 15 patrons in at a time. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

A list of NYC-themed gifts. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

“These employees allegedly worked very hard – to steal MTA time and money,” say hello to the five MTA employees accused of “brazen, repeated” overtime fraud. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: The construction of the Statue of Liberty. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

It’s the future site of 1,000 below-market-rate apartments and according to the EPA, it’s also home to a ton of toxic pollution a few feet underground. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Staten Island’s Mac’s Public House declared itself an “autonomous zone” from the state’s Covid-19 laws. It’s co-owner Danny Presti was arrested. This was followed by a swam of shitheads gathering to protest. The zip code has the fourth-highest Covid-19 positivity rate in the city. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Two dozen subway cars were hit by a graffiti storm over the weekend, hitting the 1, 6, M, G, and Q lines. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Photos: The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree is lit. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Despite what you may have read in this very newsletter, you don’t actually need a ticket to see the Christmas tree, but they are limiting the number of people who can be in the plaza at once. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The history of the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Looking for a less auspicious holiday light display? Check out this Google Doc with almost 30 holiday light displays across the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Speaking of holiday displays, the Dyker Heights Christmas lights are coming back this year, and people are not happy about it. 2020, amirite? (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

6 department store holiday windows to check out. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

RIP Betsy Wade, the first woman to edit news copy for The New York Times. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

The city can’t move the homeless New Yorkers from the Upper West Side’s Lucerne Hotel for at least two more weeks after an Appellate Court issued a temporary stay that prevents the city from moving them. This story has been ongoing since July. (Mirela Iverac for Gothamist)

It’s looking more and more like auditions for city schools’ performing arts programs will be moving online. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Outdoor dining is looking more and more like indoor dining. Bedford + Bowery asks and answers if it’s safe. The answer is that it is not. (Justin McGowan for Bedford + Bowery)

A new report that looks at data from 121 cities over 10 years shows that mass transit is not a significant vector for spreading viruses. That being said, wear your damn masks on the subway. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Photos: Inside NYC’s biggest Covid-19 lab. (Elizabeth Kim with photos by Scott Heins for Gothamist)

78% of the surveyed restaurant workers report hostile behavior from customers when staff try to enforce COVID-19 safety rules according to a new study from the One Fair Wage advocacy group. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

New York will get 170,000 doses of the Covid-19 vaccine by December 15, according to Governor Cuomo. The first phase of distribution will be focused on healthcare workers and residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Unboxing videos on YouTube hit their peak in popularity around 2014, but that didn’t stop Governor Cuomo’s live unboxing of an empty Pfizer vaccine box during a press conference this week. “What’s up, it’s ya boy Gov Cuomo and today we’re unboxing a vaccine. Remember to like, comment, and subscribe if you wanna see more content like this in the future and also to smash that bell icon to get notifications because you might miss a video if you don’t.” (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The CDC shortened its recommended quarantine to 10 days, but included a plea to just stop traveling. Roni Caryn Rabin for NY Times)

Dr Fauci, who will be staying on with the Biden administration, said we could get “back to normal, or at least approaching close to normal, as you get into the late summer and early fall,” if 75-85% of Americans get vaccinated. This was in response to a question about Broadway reopening, which has been closed since March 12 of this year. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The New York Blood Center fears a blood shortage. Here’s how to help. (Ron Lee for NY1)

10 holiday markets, pop-ups, and sales this weekend. (the skint)

The Briefly for November 20-12, 2020 – The “Rockefeller the Owl” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The school building shutdown, how restaurants may be impacted, Dupree G.O.D. turns himself in, the best Brazilian restaurants, and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 61˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 42˚ High: 61˚

The Rockefeller Christmas Tree has arrived and holy shit, it’s very sad. (Brian Kahn for Gizmodo)

How sad? Crews were seen adding extra branches to the tree to make it look less 2020. (Nicholas Rice for People)

The only good part about the tree is the tiny owl that hitched a ride in the tree and was rescued after being discovered. It’s a good owl. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Rockefeller the Owl joins Central Park’s Barry the barred owl as this year’s hot duck. (Lisa M. Collins for NY Times)

Okay, so school buildings are shut down and all learning is now remote because the city hit the 3% threshold set by the mayor, right? (Christina Veiga with contributions from Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

There is currently no school reopening plan yet. (Jillian Jorgensen for NY1)

But some preschools are still open. Nonprofit and private-operated pre-K can remain open, but in education department buildings, pre-K is closed. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Wednesday was a confusing day if you were paying attention to the news. In the middle of a press conference by Governor Cuomo, the mayor announced schools would close on Thursday. We are past cute with these two politicians who can’t see eye-to-eye and we are at a dangerous moment if they can’t get on the same page. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Meanwhile, Governor Cuomo says that if the city’s positivity rate hits 3%, new restrictions will hit the city’s restaurants, businesses, gyms, hair salons, and houses of worship. According to the state on Wednesday, the positivity rate was 2.5%. (Elizabeth Kim and Christoper Robbins for Gothamist)

The state says the positivity rate was at 2.5% on Wednesday, the city says 3.0%. A look at why the city and state report different numbers and it’s not, as Governor Cuomo put it, “a difference of opinion.” (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

While the city is closing all school buildings, indoor dining remains open. Why? The mayor controls the closing of school buildings, the governor controls the closing of everything else. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

There were 11,000 restaurant positions added in the city in October, and over 100,000 jobs have been regained since March. A 3.0% in the state’s positivity rate could upend that progress. (Greg David for The City)

“I don’t think it’s if the city is going into an orange zone, it’s a when the city’s going into an orange zone.” The mayor isn’t optimistic about our chances of staying under 3.0% in the state’s eyes. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

The governor announced new yellow zone micro-clusters in Mott Haven, Parkchester, and Highbridge in the Bronx, and Astoria, Jackson Heights, and Woodside in Queens. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

A new bill from the City Council would allow restaurants to charge a 15% Covid-19 surcharge if they pay their staff a minimum wage of $15. A law last month allows restaurants to charge a 10% surcharge. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The MTA says without federal support, the sky will be falling. For the MTA, the sky falling looks like a 40% cut in subway service, a 50% cut in the LIRR and MetroNorth, and cutting 9,367 jobs. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The City Reliquary, a museum of city artifacts, is fighting to stay open with a new membership program. (Keira Wingate for Bklyner)

Apartment Porn: I’ll be honest, this might be the most jaw-dropping apartment the city has. A three-level penthouse in Billionaires’ Row will be up for auction at the end of the year at 150 Central Park South. Five beds, five and a half baths, and four terraces with Central Park views. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A billionaire is teaming up with a real estate developer to put up a billboard in hopes to inspire New Yorkers into believing that New York isn’t dead. Are you ready to be inspired by Jerry Seinfeld and Miki Naftali’s billboard? (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

Opponents of the city’s billion-dollar East Side Coastal Resilience project begun putting posters across the neighborhood calling Mayor de Blasio and Councilmember Carolina Rivera “destroyers” of East River Park. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Remember the eco-yogi slumlords of Brooklyn? They’re being sued by the city of New York for violating eviction law, for tenant harassment, and for construction and code violations. (Bridget Read for The Cut)

Need a refresher? The Eco–Yogi Slumlords of 1214 Dean Street, Brooklyn. (Bridget Read for The Cut)

The fastest places to get a COVID-19 test in NYC. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Meet the luckiest woman in NYC. She was pushed onto the subway tracks with a train arriving at the station and survived by ducking under the train. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: Inside the new glass dome atop Union Square’s Tammany Hall. (Dana Schulz, Photos by Christopher Payne for 6sqft)

One of my favorite things when walking around the city is to look for pieces of history that have outlived the people who built them. The New York Sun clock on Broadway between Reade and Chambers outlived two incarnations of the newspaper. Fun fact: I worked for The New York Sun during its last year from 2007 to 2008 and would pass this clock every day on my way to work. (Ephemeral New York)

Earlier this week, rapper Dupree G.O.D. jumped on top of a B26 bus with a flame thrower and began… throwing flames. It was a part of filming a video for a song, but no one on the bus knew they were in a music video. He turned himself in to the NYPD on Wednesday. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

What to expect when you’re expecting the Gowanus Canal to be cleaned up. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The 15 best Brazilian restaurants in NYC. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s photo from Central Park!

The Briefly for September 20-21, 2020 – The “Don’t Call This A Staycation” Sunday Edition

Sunday’s NYC news digest: A potpourri of news, a RBG statue, City Hall’s annual report card, what we miss from pre-pandemic NYC, how to pack an emergency bag, and more

Today – Low: 52˚ High: 64˚
Clear throughout the day.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be honored with a statue in Brooklyn. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

NYC’s legal community reflects on RBG’s life and work. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

It feels insulting for for the city to push an advertising campaign that New Yorkers should “staycation” in New York City. Turns out when you remove the tourists from midtown, we still hate midtown. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The MTA has issued exactly zero summonses for mask non-compliance. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The anatomy of an NYC protest. Which role do you play? (Juliana Kim and Simbarashe Cha for NY Times)

New York City’s school reopening plans are still missing a key ingredient: enough teachers. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Parents and students react to the city’s constant waffling about the start of the school year. This feels like trying to read all of your summer reading in the weekend before school starts. (Sophia Chang, Gwynne Hogan, Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

The de Blasio administration released a 420-page document tracking City Hall operations for the last year. Murders are up. Juvenile arrests are up. Violent incidents in jails are up while population is down. The “excess death” rate” suggests the death toll from Covid-19 might be well over 50,000. NYPD response times are up. Response times for emergency complaints in NYCHA buildings is up. The homeless population increased. The good news? Rat complaints are down and there were new bike lanes built. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The report “Discipline in the NYPD 2019” outlines, but doesn’t detail, 339 cases in which officers faced departmental charges. Cops pleaded or were found guilty in 322 of those cases. Only 27 lost their jobs. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Murderinos: Look no further than your own backyard. The untold story of the Tompkins Square murder. (David Swanson for Village Voice from 1989)

Businesses around Yankee Stadium held a rally Thursday afternoon demanding that the city renegotiate the lease and tax deal that Yankee management worked out to stay in the Bronx under the Bloomberg administration, claiming that extra money obtained through the negotiation could help keep businesses surrounding the stadium stay afloat until fans are able to return to the stadium. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The 2020 fall foliage map. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

At the crossroads of art and commerce is the controversy at the Whitney, who canceled an exhibition of arresting responses to the pandemic and Black Lives Matter protests after artists of color criticized the Whitney for acquiring their work without consent and through discount sales. (Zachary Small for NY Times)

A look at how Governors Island could become a climate center for the city. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The mayor, possibly unaware that he is the mayor, made public comments about how outdoor dining “should become permanent.” Will he walk the walk or just talk the talk? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The pandemic tax? City Council voted in favor of giving restaurants the option to add a 10% charge to bills as an economic recovery support measure. The mayor supports the bill and once he signs it, it will be in effect immediately until indoor dining returns to full capacity. I guess the city’s response to us asking it to help restaurants is “help them yourself.” (Erika Adams for Eater)

If the last few years have seen the food world grapple with systemic issues like pay disparities, culinary credit, tipping, and harassment from either big-time chefs or everyday customers, the poorly regulated return of indoor dining — during a deadly pandemic, no less — feels like a middle finger to hospitality workers.
-Ryan Sutton, chief food critic for Eater, NYC’s Indoor Dining Comeback Fails Restaurant Workers. Here’s Why. for Eater

The city’s first store dedicated to Covid-19 essentials opened in Herald Square. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A new report from Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office found that 57 percent of dogs tested at city-run shelters developed respiratory disease during their stays, among other troubling findings. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD is working with the Trump administration to blame violent crime on bail reform by bringing federal charges instead of local charges against people suspected of involvement in shootings. The NYPD’s own data shows a lack of a link between bail reform and the increase in violent crime, but the truth has never stopped the NYPD of Trump administration before. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The mayor announced he will force his staff to take an unpaid one-week furlough between October 2020 and March 2021 to save money. It will save under a million dollars. The mayor is currently looking for a billion dollars of savings or will lay off 22,000 city employees. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Wanna buy a T. rex skeleton? Stan, the T. rex, is up for auction on October 6 at Christie’s. (Zachary Smalls for NY Times)

Photos: Sunnyside has become the home of fairies. No, really. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Where to eat outside in Prospect Heights. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

A love letter to the 1993 Super Mario Bros movie, a movie about two brothers from Brooklyn. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

Indoor pools will be able to open on September 30 at 33% capacity. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Apartment Porn: A $16.5 million Upper East Side townhouse with a miniature pool and a roof garden. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

More than 170 New York City transit workers have been harassed or assaulted for asking passengers to wear masks. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

38 glorious Chinese restaurants open right now. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It’s not uncommon to see people sitting outside libraries in an attempt to use the free wifi. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Columbia’s marching band disbanded itself for “a history riddled with offensive behavior.” (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

Bankruptcy will not stop New York Sports Clubs from charging you your monthly fee. The state attorney general’s office is investigating. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Trick or treating is nor canceled this year, ensuring the scariest Halloween of all time. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There will be no snow days at all this year, as classes will move to remote learning in case of snow. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

Dante in Greenwich Village, voted world’s best bar by Time Out) is now offering canned cocktails. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

In praise of Gloria’s Caribbean, a Crown Heights mainstay. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s real estate market has been hotter than Manhattan’s, pre- and post-pandemic. (Kael Goodman for amNewYork Metro)

Time Out looks back to the 10 things we miss the most about the Before Times in NYC. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: “Doggy Bags” brings giant dog sculptures to the Garment District. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

How to pack an emergency bag. Just in case. (A. C. Shilton for NY Times)

NYC’s most anticipated restaurants openings of fall 2020. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)