The Briefly for January 16, 2020 – The “Most Important Story Today: Our Mayor’s Dumb Bagel Order” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news update: A look at the propsoed Rock Center renovation, a guide to donating in NYC, the impeachment features a Queens vs Brooklyn fight, and more

Today – Low: 23˚ High: 49˚
Light rain in the morning.

The story of how Anne Carroll Moore successfully banned Goodnight Moon from New York’s Public Libraries for 25 years. (Dan Kois for Slate)

National Grid is digging a natural gas pipeline that runs through Bushwick and Williamsburg and connects to Maspeth. People are predictably angry. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

New Jersey tried to claim it has the best bagels. Stick to Bon Jovi and Springsteen, jerkwads. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

I don’t go out of my way to call Mayor de Blasio an idiot, even if 100% of respondents from The Briefly said they don’t think he’s doing a good job, but I can’t resist here. Our idiot mayor took to Twitter to declare the best bagel in New York is a toasted wheat bagel with cream cheese. Excuse me? Toasted wheat? What else would you expect from someone who eats pizza with a fork and loves the Red Sox? (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Here’s the best part of the “idiot mayor orders bagel for idiots” story. The very specific bagel he is referring to, toasted wheat with cream cheese from the Bagel Hole in Park Slope is not possible to get at the Bagel Hole. The Bagel Hole does not toast bagels or even own a bagel toaster. The mayor deleted the offending tweet. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

While were on the subject of politicians with bad bagel orders, let’s not forget Cynthia Nixon’s abomination of a bagel order. (Whitney Filloon for Eater)

The Parks Department needs to remove and move nearly 15,000 tons of lead-contaminated soil from the Red Hook ballfields. Where will it go? Concrete is being recycled in the city and the rest is being hauled off in trucks to a landfill in Falls Township, PA. (Helene Stapinkski for NY Times)

Governor Cuomo was in Puerto Rico this week to survey the damage done by the series of earthquakes that have plagued the island. This is a task that would any normal president would be doing, but we do not live in normal times. (Anna Gronewald for Politico)

The A/C/E lines have been approved for a signal upgrade, which should start later this year with the signals replaced from Columbus Circle to High St by 2025. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

The Onion: Top 10 things to do in New York City. (The Onion)

The Parks Department had plans to renovate Fort Greene Park, but the New York Supreme Court has decided that the 30-acre landscape would not be subject to a redesign or the removal of 83 mature trees until a proper environmental impact review is conducted. (Sydney Franklin for The Architect’s Newspaper)

New Brooklyn bars and restaurants to check out this winter. (Jennifer Indig for Brooklyn Based)

Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents continued to arrest people in and around New York courthouses in 2019, flouting a state directive to curtail such operations, according to a new report from the Immigrant Defense Project. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: Buzz-a-Rama is the city’s last slot car raceway. Run by Frank “Buzz” Perri, Buzz-A-Rama is open on the weekends in Kensington from September through June. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The IDNYC program is now making cards available in braille and have added new perks for cardholders, including more free one-year memberships to cultural institutions and free admission to the Queens Botanical Garden on Wednesdays. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Congrats smokers, New York is the most expensive state for smokers. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Watch Christmas trees go from curb to mulch. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The state’s Board of Elections are considering buying a new system of voting machines that are less secure than our current systems, expensive, and can’t handle a ranked choice voting election, which we will see in the city in 2021. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

A guide to drinking and buying natural wine. (Hannah Howard for Grub Street)

Here are the eight candidates for Queens borough president that will be on the ballot on March 24: Council Members Jimmy Van Bramer, Costa Constantinides, Donovan Richards; former Council Member Elizabeth Crowley; former Assistant District Attorney Jim Quinn, police reform advocate Anthony Miranda, William Kregler, Danniel Maio, and Dao Yin. (Allie Griffin got Jackson Heights Post)

The city effectively deregulated a so-called “play street” located outside of a Park Slope middle school earlier this month, eliminating recreational space for students in favor of placard parking for teachers and faculty. In an even more incompetent move, the city claims the special designation of “play street” was revoked in 2014, but no one removed the sign until a few weeks ago. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

What should you do if you one across a seal? It may seem like a weird question in New York City, but this week there have already been three seal sightings reported across the city. First and foremost, don’t approach it. Are you some kind of marine mammal expert? You’re probably not. Call the New York Marine Rescue Center’s 24-hour hotline (631-369-9829). (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Spring cleaning is coming soon. A guide to donating your clothes, furniture, books, and electronics. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Renderings: See the proposed renovations to Rockefeller Center. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The Christmas Tree in Rockefeller Center has been replaced by a giant peacock. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Renders: The Hudson Yards shared renderings of the next phase of development in an attempt to dispel rumors of plans to build a wall to separate the Western Yards from the rest of us plebes. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Representatives Jerrold Nadler and Hakeem Jeffries from Brooklyn will serve as the house managers for the impeachment hearings in the Senate, setting up a Queens vs Brooklyn battle on a federal level. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Video: A walk from Wall Street to Downtown Brooklyn. (ActionKid)

A panel appointed by Mayor de Blasio and others intends to propose a public-private partnership to bailout thousands of taxi drivers trapped in exploitative loans that could cost as much as $500 million. (Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

A look inside Brownie’s Hobby Shop, one of the city’s last true hobby shops. (Amanda Fairinacci for NY1)

Chief Martine Materasso is the first woman to lead the NYPD’s Bureau of Counterterrorism. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

Some answers, not satisfying ones but they’re still answers, about what the hell is going on with Grand Central’s lack of accessibility. (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

20 stellar jewish delis. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The Briefly for December 5, 2019 – The “Fight of the Year: Duck vs Subway Car” Edition

In today’s daily NYC news digest: Uber’s top tourist destination, Parks takes over the city’s mass grave island, the Mets have a new owner, the best latkes in the city, and more.

The latest restaurant openings with potential. (The Infatuation)

Hart Island, the country’s largest taxpayer-funded mass-grave site, is now under the control of the Department of Parks instead of the Department of Corrections. New York City has been burying its veterans, its poor, its anonymous, and those infected in the early days of the AIDS crisis for over a century. The Department of Parks is tasked with providing access to the public for visitation of the million bodies buried on the 131 acre island. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Anthony Benedetto’s art is on display at the Art Students League. Maybe you know him as Tony Bennett. (Untapped New York)

In the fight of duck vs subway car, ducks win. A duck wandered on its way onto the tracks of the N train in Brooklyn, causing the train line to come to a complete stop while this terrible little scamp was removed. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

The 10 neighborhoods to watch in real estate in 2020, with no real surprises. Williamsburg wouldn’t have made the cut if the L train had been shutdown, but it’s sitting at #1 instead. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Say hello to seven recipients of the 11th Annual Sloan Awards for Excellence in Teaching Science and Mathematics in New York City Public High Schools. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Photos: The tree lighting ceremony at Rockefeller Center. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

11-year-old Charlotte Nebres is making history as the first Black dancer cast in the leading role of Marie in the New York City Ballet’s production of “George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker.” (Kimberley Richards for HuffPost)

The best latkes in the city. (Leah Koenig for Grub Street)

After months of negotiation and multiple threats of a transit strike, the MTA and Transport Workers Union Local 100 have reached an agreement. The details won’t be publicly available until after the contract is ratified by TWU 100 members. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Take a look inside Christina Hendricks’s apartment on W 56th. The 800 square foot apartment is on the market after her divorce to Geoffrey Arend. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

The Mets have a new majority owner in billionaire Steve Cohen, who increased his investment by $2.6 billion. Cohen became a minority owner in 2008 after former majority owners the Wilpons were caught up in the Bernie Madoff scandal. Unfortunately for the Mets the Wilpons will stay on as CEO and COO for the next five years. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

Watch videos from the final performance at Brooklyn Bazaar. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The best vegetarian restaurants on the Upper West Side. (Hannah Rosenfield for I Love the Upper West Side)

What to see, eat and drink near Brooklyn’s new Wegmans. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Despite its designation as a “public place” since 1974, architects and developers showed a plan to build nearly one thousand apartments on a 5.8 acre site on the corner of Smith St and Fifth St in Gowanus. Brad Lander, who has been excessively bullish on rezoning Gowanus and adding over 8,000 apartments to the small neighborhood, pushed the development at a Community Board meeting on Monday. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The story of the Taxi King, his rise to power and crash back to earth. (Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

One thing that won’t be returning to Lincoln Center after its half-billion dollar renovation is Richard Lippold’s 190-foot-long, 39-foot-high sculpture Orpheus and Apollo. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The top destination in the city for Uber trips by tourists in the city is as obvious as it gets: The Empire State Building. It was actually the #1 destination on the planet. The most popular place in the entire state was the Queens Center Mall in Elmhurst. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

Applications for middle and high school are due Friday, December 6. Here’s what you need to know. (Amy Zimmer and Christina Veiga for ChalkBeat)

The tragedy of the red horse hopper, told in three photos. (EV Grieve)

Why the census has always been controversial in New York City. (Diana Buds for Curbed)

The trailer for the fourth season of High Maintenance was released this week, with the show returning in early February. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Everyone could use a story with a happy ending. When Ashley Patrick left her purse with her wallet, headphones and a pair of gloves for her son on the Q train, she assumed they’d never find their way home. Let’s call this one a holiday miracle. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

NYC’s 11 most festive bars and restaurants. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)

The Briefly for December 4, 2019 – The “Another Reason Not to Eat Sushi From Walgreens” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Mayor de Blasio says a new stupid thing, the most popular dog names in the city, a french fry shortage is on the horizon, the Rock Center tree, and more.

The city won’t reveal its master plan for the Sunnyside Yards at a traditional town hall meeting, instead favoring a digital town hall, requiring participants to register in advance. Does the EDC expect a massive turnout and couldn’t find an appropriate space or are they trying to suppress opposition to their plan? (Michael Dorgan and Christian Murray for LIC Post)

If you’re the Governors Ball-going type, tickets are available for presale and they’re dropping hints about the lineup on Instagram. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

There’s a recall of ready-to-eat sushi, salads, and spring rolls from Trader Joe’s and Walgreens due to a contamination of Listeria. Trader Joe’s has reported no illnesses and if you have contaminated food you can bring it back for a refund. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Is Hurricane Dorian going to cause a french fry shortage? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A cargo delivery bike pilot program will be announced today with Amazon, DHL, and Whole Foods among its participants. The bikes look to be part truck and part bike, but will take up a much smaller footprint in regards to carbon and parking. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

More info on the cargo bikes: They’ll be big, but also pedal assisted, allowed in commercial loading spaces, and will be concentrated from 60th to the Battery. (Winnie Hu and Matthew Hang for NY Times)

The process to make Rikers Island a public space kicked off this week to make way for the jail’s closing in 2026. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall is getting a $550 million remodel. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

Has Mayor de Blasio’s control over the city’s schools been effective? The state Assembly will hold a hearing on the 16th. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s coming to Off-Broadway this December. (Matt Windman for amNewYork)

Vending machines like the CVS machines in Union Square and Chambers St station is both a new and nearly 120 year old idea. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A holiday tipping guide: How much to tip your doorman, super, porter, and more. (Brick Underground)

New York spends the most per student than any other state in the country and has the 13th lowest graduation rate. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Quickly: What’s the different between hemp and marijuana? The Brooklyn District Attorney’s office doesn’t know either. Earlier this year they boasted about stopping 106 pounds of marijuana from hitting the streets, but it was hemp, and they arrested Oren Levy from Green Angel CBD under the same assumption. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’ll be easier to prove tenant harassment from landlords thanks to new bills signed into law by Governor Cuomo. The laws expand the definition of harassment, remove the requirement that tenants prove they’ve been physically hurt by their landlords, and increases punishment for landlords who try to force out rent-regulated tenants. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 Rockefeller enter Christmas tree. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

New Yorkers pride themselves on knowing the best alternatives. The best delis that aren’t Katz, the best pizza in DUMBO that isn’t from Grimaldi’s, the best food that isn’t outside your neighborhood, etc. Here are 20 Christmas trees that aren’t in Rockefeller Center. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A new public light installation at Brookfield Place called Light Up Luminaries creates a canopy of multi-colored, lit up cubes suspended from the ceiling with a “show” every hour. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

Lord & Taylor is returning to the city for two weeks in December in the form of a 2,400 square foot pop-up shop in Soho, a far cry from their 676,000 square foot Fifth Avenue flagship location that was shuttered at the beginning of the year. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

The NYPD has been shooting surveillance films of “individuals and enemies of the state” for decades and thanks to the Handschu agreement, over a hundred hours of digitized footage from the 1960s through the 1980s is available through the Department of Records & Information Services. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The laws passed on Tuesday are only the start of what advocates hope will be a fruitful 2020 session when it comes to rent reforms. Multiple bills addressing evictions, tenant protections and housing stability are still in-process in Albany. (Mark Hallum for amNewyork)

The mayor is venturing towards full-on idiot mode with every passing day. When asked if the NYPD should be allowed to publicly display Thin Blue Line flags on NYPD property, the mayor said “There’s a lot of Photoshop in this world, so we’ll see.” The Thin Blue Line flag has been adopted by neo-Nazis and white supremacists in response to the Black Lives Matter movement. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

40 inexpensive dining destinations. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New Yorkers speak 637 languages, and the Endangered Language Alliance has mapped them all. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Let’s start with the obvious, we did not arrest Wolverine.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

How much did your school’s PTA bring in last year? (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

The most popular dog names in the city and Max and Bella. You’ve gotta step up your dog naming game. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden is offering free admission Tuesday to Friday, noon to 4:30pm. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

At least five Rikers Island correction officers have been suspended as investigators examine their failure to stop an 18-year-old detainee’s suicide attempt. (Ed Shanahan and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

Where to go when you’ve eaten everywhere in Williamsburg. (The Infatuation)