The Briefly for April 2, 2019 – The “Most Expensive Toll Bridge in America is Not What You Think” Edition

Democrats are splintering over the state’s budget, the Pride March route, Harlem’s disappearing apartments, teens can’t legally vape, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Only 61.9% of New Yorkers participated in the 2010 census and to make sure more New Yorkers participate in 2020 the state cut the budget for the census in half. Oh wait, that doesn’t sound right. (Bklyner)

Nude sunrise yoga? Shockingly, we’re not talking about Bushwick. (LICTalk)

The “Clock Tower Buiding” in Tribeca needs a new name. The clock tower is being turned into a penthouse apartment. (Curbed)

The most expensive toll in America takes you to… Staten Island. (Patch)

Sorry, teens, no more vaping for you. In 120 days, the legal age to buy tobacco products, electronic cigarettes and liquid nicotine in New York will be raised from 18 to 21. (NY Post)

A disagreement over sick-leave will mean that the city’s fire engines may be left shorthanded, reducing some teams by 20%. (Patch)

The governor called the state budget the “greatest budget of the past decade,” but 17 Democrats in the state assembly voted against it because it was not progressive enough. (NY Times)

80% of the funds raised from congestion pricing will go towards MTA capital projects, with the remaining 20% being split between the LIRR and Metro North. (Curbed)

Today is one of six Equal Pay Days. (amNY)

Video: This is what the city’s war on electric bikes through the eyes of a Chinese delivery person. (Gothamist)

Rabbi Dovid Feldman is calling on City Councilmember Kalman Yeger to resign after his comment that Palestine “doesn’t exist.” (Brooklyn Paper)

Kalman Yeger has been removed from the City Council Committee on Immigration. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s new mansion tax will raise $365 million for the MTA. (6sqft)

No one is buying Mayor de Blasio’s claim to be reducing the city’s fleet of cars. (Streetblog)

AOC tweets, the NY Post has to write about it. (NY Post)

Congestion pricing may have passed, but the MTA is looking for technology solutions to implement it. (amNY)

David Blaine is the latest public figure to be under investigation from the NYPD for alleged sexual assault. (Gothamist)

Okay, so there was no legal weed in the state’s budget, but the governor is totally going to do it by June. (NY Post)

Watch: Can you tell the difference between New York pizza and a slice from a chain? (Viewing NYC)

Where to eat at Citi Field, where you can also find a baseball team playing sometimes. (Eater)

Harlem saw a decrease of 831 housing units despite an uptick in construction. Where are the apartments going? (Curbed)

The route for this year’s Pride March has been released, making a “U” starting at Madison Square Park heading down to the Stonewall Inn and coming back up 7th Ave to end at 23rd St. (The Villager)

If you’re on Roosevelt Island, avoid Octagon Field. Two dads and six kids were issued a summons for playing on the field. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Two former NYPD detectives who dodged rape convictions are asking a judge to ban the DNA evidence in that case from being used in the new one against them. (NY Post)

Hunts Point, the neighborhood that feeds NYC. (Streeteasy)

Michael Grimm, the current convicted felon and former member of Congress, is considering running for Congress again. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

21 ideal date-night restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

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The Briefly for February 21, 2019 – The “No One Thinks de Blasio Should Run for President” Edition

A look at the Public Advocate debate, low-level marijuana cases are down 98% in Brooklyn, the city lied to get more FEMA funding, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

It looks like a museum, but it’s a button store named for a Gertrude Stein poem. (Atlas Obscura)

The city subpoenaed 20,000 apartment listings from Airbnb as a response to what Mayor de Blasio says is Airbnb’s unwillingness to cooperate with the city to crackdown on illegal hotels. (The Real Deal)

The 11 best things to do on Roosevelt Island, but maybe you want to wait for spring first. (6sqft)

There is a special election for the city’s Public Advocate on Tuesday. As a reader of The Briefly you are among some of the most informed voters in the city. Here’s what you need to know about the election. (Gothamist)

Watch the second Public Advocate debate in full. (NY1)

There is one thing that all the Public Advocate candidates from last night’s debate agree on: Bill de Blasio should not run for president. (Politico)

StreetsPAC has endorsed Melissa Mark-Viverito for Public Advocate. (Streetsblog)

The 12 best restaurants in Rego Park and Forest Hills. (Grub Street)

Five takeaways from the Public Advocate debate. (Patch)

New York City will never become a cashless society if Councilman Ritchie Torres’s bill passes. (NY Times)

Low level marijuana cases are down 98% in Brooklyn. At a cost of $2,000 per arrest, it’s quite a bit of savings. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Can you run a business out of your apartment? (Bushwick Daily)

If you want to party like the kids on “Made in Staten Island,” here’s your guide. If you want to avoid partying like the kids on “Made in Staten Island,” here’s your guide of places to avoid. (amNY)

13 bars and restaurants for history lovers across the United States, including Manhattan’s Fraunces Tavern. (Atlas Obscura)

The gentrification of Bed Stuy is threatening the existence of the city’s last black-owned LGBTQ club. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Have you ever been through a breakup so bad that it makes you swear off dating altogether? The End Corporate Welfare Act is the City Council’s version of that with luring giant corporations to the city with subsidies. (Patch)

Take a look at Spike Lee’s New York City. (StreetEasy)

How can the MTA fix the R train? Congressman Max Rose’s solution is Solomon-esque. (amNY)

Murder in the city is up by 55% this year compared to last. Some police officers are blaming the end of stop and frisk. (NY Post)

The city lied to FEMA to get more Hurricane Sandy relief funding and will pay the federal government back more than $5.3 million as part of a tentative settlement. (NY Times)

East Harlem residents are feeling pissed about this closed public bathroom. So are the recipients of the more than 1,500 public urination summonses in the area. (Patch)

Winter is harsh on the city, but it causes chaos, explosions, fires, leaks, and uncertainty underground, where electric, steam, water, and gas lines flow. Climate change is making it worse. (NY Times)

Bookmark this list for the next extremely cold day. 19 stellar soups. (Eater)

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The Briefly for October 26, 2018 – The “New York’s Vampire King Will See You Now” Edition

All the weekend’s scheduled subway changes, another bookstore announces a closure, the ultimate list of Halloween events, the Right to Know Act, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

New York’s Vampire King has seen a resurgence since the city’s 1990 goth club phase, as the immortal curiosity and the internet have brought New York’s vampire culture back from the dead. (NY Times)

This weekend’s scheduled subway changes includes bad news for the L, Q, and 7 trains.

The ultimate list of 75+ Halloween events for $35 and under. (the skint)

Billboard barges are the new norm. (Bowery Boogie)

All of Terminal 5 at JFK’s bathrooms were completely shut down on Thursday for multiple hours due to a broken water main. Yikes. (Gothamist) Okay, that’s pretty bad, but here’s some good news for travelers. WiFi is now free in JFK, LaGuardia and (if you must) Newark airports! (amNY)

10 secrets from FDR Four Freedoms Park on Roosevelt Island. (Untapped Cities)

This is the last outdoor weekend for Smorgasburg and the last weekend for the Queens Night Market. (Eater)

Did someone projectile vomit on you while riding the M train? She would like to apologize. (@anateboteo)

Are all the city’s bookstores closing? After 101 years, The Drama Book Shop on W 40th is set to close in 2019. (Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about the Right To Know Act. (Bklyner)

See Broadway, from Bowling Green to 56th St, as it was in 1899 with these pectoral descriptions that pre-date Google Street View by a few years. (NYPL)

They met on OKCupid, went back to his place, and she left with his $10,000 watch. (NY Post)

Halloween Impalement returns to Cobble Hill this year. (Gothamist)

WinterFest, and an ice skating rink, is coming to the Brooklyn Museum. (6sqft)

The Sunnyside Yards project offers the city an amazing opportunity, but even with community involvement, will they find a way to ruin it? (Sunnyside Post)

During the NY Senate debate between sitting Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and Chele Farley, Gillibrand made it clear she has no intentions of running for president in 2020. (ABC7)

What the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights $5 million Mass Bailout action is all about, from a volunteer’s perspective. (Gothamist)

The coach bus driver who killed a man on a CitiBike will be going to jail for the maximum amount of time allowed by law, 30 days, after being convicted of a misdemeanor and traffic infraction. (NY Post)

How far is too far for the influence national politics has on a local scale? (NY Times)

The best lunch spots in 40 different neighborhoods. (Thrillist)


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