The Briefly for July 14, 2020 – The “Like Noise Canceling for Your Open Windows” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: All politics is beans, the NYPD protects a Blue Lives Matter rally, marriage can wait (it has to), the Mets have a possible buyer, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

10 things you must know about NYC before moving here. It’s probably too late for all of you. Do you know these things? #1 is “It’s expensive,” so you probably know that one. (Localize.City)

Shake Shack gave its PPP loan back. Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group fired 2,000 of its 2,300 employees in March and used different LLCs to apply and receive loans between $11.4 million and $27 million. (Matthew Schuerman with research by Jake Dobkin and Megan Zerez for Gothamist)

It’s not ready for purchase, but researchers in Singapore have developed an early version of noise canceling headphones for your apartment windows. (David Waldstein for NY Times)

Goya is at the center of politics in 2020, a statement no one saw coming, from Republican Nicole Malliotakis’s Goya canned food drive to AOC publishing an Adobo recipe. This is all because the CEO of Goya said the USA is “truly blessed” to have a leader like President Trump. (Clarissa Sosin for Queens County Politics)

The White Horse Tavern, which openly flaunted the state’s social distancing guidelines, had its liquor license temporarily suspended. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Looking for a break from everyday life? Six unique NYC Airbnbs. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Looking to get married in the city? You’re gonna have to wait. Appointments to get a license using the city’s “Project Cupid” site has a backlog that stretches on for months. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Davell Gardner, a 1-year-old boy, was shot dead at a BBQ in Bed-Stuy at the Raymond Bush playground on Sunday night. Three other people were shot, but are expected to survive. (NY1)

If C.K. McWhorter’s $1.8 billion bid to buy the Mets goes through, he would become the only black owner in Major League Baseball. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Trigg Brown — the chef and co-owner of one of NYC’s most buzzed-about restaurants, Win Son — is temporarily stepping away from day-to-day operations after employees leveled allegations that he fostered a hostile workplace. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Black Lives Matter mural outside of Trump Tower was already defaced. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Sunday on the beach at Coney Island was a great example of a failure to socially distance. In a neighborhood without Open Streets or many parks, the beach is the only viable place to gather outdoors. (Ariama C. Long for Kings County Politics)

Say hello to Chi Ossé, an activist running for City Council in the 36th District and the youngest candidate to ever run for City Council. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

36 members of the City Council are calling on Joe Borelli, a City Councilmember from Staten Island, to apologize after his obviously racist attack on the celebration. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

It seems the city has finally rid itself of a noted homophobe and City Councilmember Rubén Díaz Sr., whose Congressional bid was met with a responding “NOPE.” Díaz Sr. won’t be seeking office after his term is up in 2021. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal is dropping out of the race for Comptroller in 2021, blaming her dropping out on the coronavirus pandemic. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance hasn’t announced if he’ll be seeking another term in office, but his list of challengers is growing. Despite making recent headlines with cases against President Trump and Harvey Weinstein, Vance’s office has garnered a lot of well-earned criticism for how it’s handled abuse cases against the rich and famous. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

The five candidates vying for Vance’s job will participate in a forum today, essentially the race’s first debate, without Vance. (Andrew Millman for Gotham Gazette)

All travelers flying into airports in New York state will now have to fill out a form providing contact and itinerary information or face a $2,000 fine. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Strand’s new Upper West Side location opens on Wednesday, but rather than hiring more staff, the book store has fired a dozen of their recently rehired staffers. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

NYPD traffic agent Jeanisidor Jean Baptiste was arrested in Brooklyn after an investigation uncovered years of alleged sexual abuse to a five-year-old girl from 2008 through 2012. The victim is now 17. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

If the NYPD is called on to keep the peace during rival Black Lives Matter and Blue Lives Matter protests, who do you think they’ll defend? On Sunday in Bay Ridge, the NYPD made two arrests after Blue Lives Matter protesters attacked the Black Lives Matter protesters. Both men arrested were Black. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Sex workers joined together outside of the Stonewall Inn on July 9 to rally against police brutality and send a message that sex work is work. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

A new bill is calling for a ban of the NYPD’s use of drones for recording or collecting data on the general public in open spaces. The bill also restricts the use of drones without a warrant and bans facial recognition, and is sponsored by State Senator Jessica Ramos. (NY1)

It was a few days of good news about Covid-19 infections in New York, so it’s time to tamp that down a bit. There’s a new spike in infections in New Yorkers in their 20s. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

It’s nice to think that the city really had zero Covid-19 deaths on Saturday, but that’s probably not true. The way the city assigns death dates means that we won’t actually know for a few days. Over the last week, there have been 12 confirmed Covid-19 deaths, and one probable death each day. (Jen Carlson and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Schools can reopen in the fall for regions in phase four and have infection rates below 5%, according to the guidelines set forward by Governor Cuomo. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

It’s not all good news for schools. If the city’s infection rate surges past 9% later in August or after the school year starts, schools will be forced to close. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

For months following Amazon’s decision to pull out, we felt forgotten and it appeared that our goal of creating a Long Island City waterfront that would empower our community and create a significant number of jobs was lost. Then last year, a new process emerged.
-Carol Wilkins, April Simpson-Taylor, Claudia Coger & Annie Cotton-Morris, NYCHA Tenant Leaders: Where Amazon Never Arrived, New Opportunity Arises for Gotham Gazette

6 Manhattan homes with their own private pools and hot tubs. Must be nice. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

It was only a matter of time. A driver crashed his car into an outdoor dining area on Roosevelt Ave in Queens. Four diners and a server were injured. (Justine Re for NY1)

16 places to pick up food news Prospect Park has a few good gems, even if a few of them are laughably far away and other picks ignore where the park’s entrances are. (Nikko Duren & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Micah Eames for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for May 28, 2020 – The “Can You Spare $9 Billion?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Farewell to Train Daddy for real, Mayor de Blasio continues to be content to not lead, one of the happiest places in NYC, and more

Today – Low: 64˚ High: 69˚
Overcast throughout the day.

The city remains on PAUSE, with 5/7 metrics met.

Andy Byford, you’re gone for real. Train Daddy is headed to London to become their new Transport Commissioner. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

When New York City beings phase one of reopening, does the MTA have a plan to allow that to happen? We’ve heard multiple ideas floated in the last few months for the subways, but the MTA hasn’t yet put forward their plan on how to deal with construction and manufacturing workers returning to their jobs. Stephen Nessen and Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Curbed puts it best: Did New York City just give up on public transit? (Alissa Walker for Curbed)

Got $9 billion to spare? New York could use it. The city’s budget is due by the end of June and with a $9 billion hole to crawl out of, things are likely to get worse before they get better. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Say hello to Bobby Catone, the city’s biggest jackass. He plans on opening his Staten Island tanning salon to the public today in defiance of the governor’s orders. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

It seems that when people fled New York City, they also left behind their census forms. Also: An interactive map to see how you’re district is responding to the 2020 census. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

The coronavirus layoffs are hitting Black households in New York harder than white households. 44% of Black households have seen a layoff compared to 27% of white households, but 84% of Black voters feared reopening too quickly compared to 59% white. There’s a reason for that fear, more than double the number of Black New Yorkers have died during the pandemic than white New Yorkers. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Photos: Construction on “Little Island,” the two-acre park being built on Pier 55 is progressing ahead of its scheduled spring 2021 opening. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A bodybag protest was laid at the doorstep of city hall to show the plight of homeless New Yorkers, who crowd into the city’s shelters every night. Protesters demanded the city open up hotel rooms as an alternative to crowded shelters. (Toss Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Okay, we’re all sick of cooking every meal for ourselves, right? Here comes WoodSpoon to allow you to order home-cooked meals prepared by out-of-work chefs. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The New York Public Library is considering curbside service at libraries. Reserve your book in advance and swing by a kiosk to pick it up. If it can happen at Best Buy without the pandemic, it can happen at the NYPL during it. (Reuven Blau for The City)

A look inside a plasma donation center, which the Times is calling “one of the happiest places in New York.” (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

Beyond Sushi is opening a ghost kitchen in Long Island City. (Jacob Kaye for QNS)

The city has offered very little in terms of help for restaurant and bar owners and has offered absolutely nothing in terms of a plan for reopening. Not only have they offered nothing in terms of help, but Mayor de Blasio is also stepping up enforcement of bars and restaurants in nine neighborhoods. Where the hell has the “Nightlife Mayor” been on this? Isn’t this a job specifically designed for them to be helping with? (Erika Adams for Eater)

The mayor’s response to this entire crisis has been to sit back and let other cities lead. Instead of leading the city’s help and support restaurants and bars and small businesses, he sits on his hands and watches. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

RIP Larry Kramer, whose activism helped shifted the nation’s policies towards AIDS. (Daniel Lewis for NY Times)

Have you become the master of your kitchen under quarantine? Are you ready for a challenge? Step up to the word’s stinkiest fruit, durian, and make some desserts with this dessert box available for delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Attorney General Letitia James filed an amicus brief on Tuesday as part of a coalition of 14 attorneys general who are hoping to keep the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement out of courthouses unless they have a judicial warrant or court order. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

With budget cuts looming large, CUNY plans to continue online courses through the fall semester, with only a small fraction of courses and services offered in-person. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

There is no specific place in the city to collectively grieve, but the Naming the Lost project has set up a memorial outside of Green-Wood Cemetery for people to post tributes to those who lost their lives to Covid-19. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

A few neighborhood restaurants and bakeries selling housemade sourdough starter by the ounce, cup, and jar. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

“If we are going to make progress, we’ve got to address these things, and if this painful process is going to help us address this — there’s the yellow warbler!” –Christian Cooper on the Central Park incident, racism, his thoughts on Amy Cooper, and birdwatching in Central Park. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

After the Central Park Karen story, State Assemblymember Felix Ortix and State Senator Brian Benjamin have introduced a new bill that would criminalize falsely reporting an incident to police and make the offense eligible for hate crime status. (Zack Linly for The Root)

Yesterday I made mention that Governor Cuomo was headed to DC to talk President Trump into helping the state’s infrastructure projects. He came back and declared good government “extinct” in America. I’m not a political scientist, but I’m not sure that’s a good sign. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Interactive Map: New York City’s wisteria is in bloom, here’s where to see it. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Ruben Diaz, Sr. is an opponent of same-sex marriage and women’s reproductive rights and is also a Democrat. What does it mean to be a Democrat in New York City? (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

How to get hired as a contact tracer in NYC and what the job entails. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The state’s legislature has effectively killed the rent cancellation bill, taking up a “totally inadequate” bill instead. In its place is a bill that gives landlords vouchers if a landlord’s tenants must earn 80% below an area’s income anad have been paying more than 30% of their household income on rent before March 30. The total budget would give 50,000 tenants two monthly vouchers of $1,000. For perspective, one-quarter of the city’s 5.4 million renters did not pay rent last month. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The numbers have slowed, but not enough for reopening. A look into who are the New Yorkers who are getting sick? (Andy Newman for NY Times)

Okay, what is going on with “The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York,” being surreptitiously placed on the bookshelf in nearly every cable news interview? (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

A somewhat complete (for now) guide to beach food at Rockaway Beach. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The latest openings, reopenings, takeout specials, and other exciting or noteworthy updates in the weekly restaurant update from The Infatuation. (Hannah Albertine for the Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 15, 2019 – The “I’ve Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway” Edition

Our absent mayor was absent during the blackout, the reinvention of the rainbow cookie, de Blasio hires his son to save his 0% campaign, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The late-night disruptions this week are minimal unless you’re on the L train in Brooklyn. Service is suspended between Lorimer and Broadway Junction. (Subway Weekender)

A gallery of how broadway shows and professional musicians handled the blackout, along with New Yorkers stepping up to direct traffic, and a video of the lights turning back on. (Huff Post)

When the power went out, the first question was “why?” The second question was where the hell is our mayor? (NY Times)

Where was the mayor? He has an average 0% support and yet he was spending the day in Iowa. (Politico)

When he was asked on the air on CNN at 9 pm, two hours after the blackout began the mayor said he was still weighing his options. (Politico)

While a portion of the city sat in darkness, it was Corey Johnson that provided public leadership on the news, Twitter, and during Sunday’s press conference. Our absentee mayor continued to be absent. (Chelsea Now)

Want to live in a city where you can save money for a rainy day? Too bad, you live in New York. (CNBC)

If you’re the person that’s been praying for consistent hot temperatures, this is the week where all your friends will give you the side-eye. Welcome to the first sweltering week of summer. (amNY)

The state legislature passed the Utility Responsibility Bill and now it waits for the governor’s signature. The bill would protect homeowners if any damage was done to their property by utility companies. (QNS)

Do you know the difference between a studio and a one-bedroom apartment? Did you know a bedroom needs to be a minimum of 80 square feet with a ceiling height minimum of eight feet? (StreetEasy)

R. Kelly has been arrested and indicted of racketeering and violating federal anti-sex trafficking laws. These are in addition to the charges he’s facing in Illinois. He faces up to 70 years in prison. (Patch)

The rainbow cookie is already perfect, but some chefs can’t leave well-enough alone. (Eater)

Whoever the monster is that stole the key to the city received by Allie Long, a member of the US Women’s National Team, understand that you have made very powerful enemies. (Gothamist)

Your landlord can threaten to let your apartment fall into disrepair, but they can’t actually do that. Learn about the warranty of habitability and what it means for your apartment. (Gothamist)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health includes “BKLYN Wild” in the Time Out Market, which broke the 100 violation point mark with a 102 score. (Patch)

Governor Cuomo, who has insisted that he is not in control of the MTA, has they need you to adopt or foster an animal. (amNY)

This Saturday is the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission to the moon and the city is celebrating multiple ways. (Gothamist)

Inside a mostly abandoned mall in Queens, Board of Elections worker are counting out the fate of the Queens District Attorney’s office. (Gothamist)

A lawsuit is challenging the legality of the “spot rezoning” that was necessary to allow the 80 Flatbush development project a reality. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Abel Cedeno says he had been bullied for being gay, took the stand in his own defense at his manslaughter trial for the murder of two of his high school classmates with a knife. (NY Times)

The city unveiled its plans to protect the east side of Manhattan from the Lower East Side to 25th St with the design of the East River Park. The East Side Coastal Resiliency Project’s walls and design would protect the area from a 16 foot level of sea rise, which is the “100-year flood + waves” level. (Curbed)

A human leg was found in a channel in the waters of Coney Island. (Brooklyn Paper)

If you think you apply for affordable housing in the city, registration is a fairly simple process. (Curbed)

The city council’s Committee on Small Business is calling on Letitia James’s office to look at the settlement agreement that allowed Grub Hub to buy Seamless in 2013 in light of the reports about Grub Hub’s business tactics. (Grub Street)

JetBlue installed Does Starbucks sell newspapers? If you answered no, you’ll soon be proven right because the company announced that they will stop selling The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and USA Today at its 8,600 locations nationwide. (NY Times)

RIP Hector Figueroa, former president of the Service Employees International Union and a key player in the fight for a $15 minimum wage. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio is polling at a 0% average in the Democrat presidential primary. Will hiring his son help his campaign? It literally couldn’t hurt it. (NY Times)

A preliminary report is suggesting that the impending MTA overhaul reduce the number of groups within the organization from 40 into six departments to centralize and simplify. The MTA’s board is expected to vote on a final version of the plan on the 24th. (amNY)

The President’s ICE enforcement action started on Saturday in the city, but early reports indicate that no one opened their doors for ICE and as a result, no one was detained. (amNY)

The race to replace José E. Serrano after he steps down as a result of a Parkinson’s disease diagnosis will be contended by Ruben Diaz Sr, an openly homophobic city councilperson, and Ritchie J Torres, the first openly gay person to hold office in the Bronx. (NY Times)

Need a late-night fix and you already had pizza for lunch? A list of late-night delivery spots that aren’t just pizza. (The Infatuation)

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