The Briefly for July 13, 2020 – The “A Summer Without Street Fairs” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Public libraries are opening, the first day without a Covid-19 death since March, the MTA looks for ideas, the NYPD steals streets, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 86˚
Clear throughout the day.

You’ll see some headlines that some areas of Queens are seeing a 58% or 68% positive rate for antibodies. While this seems like good news, having antibodies is no way to guarantee that you can’t get the infection again or even that you’ve had the infection in the past. The hope would be that neighborhoods may develop herd immunity. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

The city has not built up herd immunity, which is the message from Jay Varna, the Senior Advisor for Public Health, NYC Mayor’s Office, and a vast majority of New Yorkers are still susceptible. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city’s ban on events means a summer without street fairs. This also includes Celebrate Brooklyn!, the Dominican Day Parade, San Gennaro, and the West Indian-American Day Carnival. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

As you might expect, the Electric Zoo 2020 has been canceled. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Saturday was the first day since March 13 that no one was recorded as dying due to the coronavirus. Since March 23,283 were reported dead. (Nick Visser for HuffPost)

A look at the more difficult side of the Occupy City Hall, as the organizers have realized that their roles include caretakers for dozens of the city’s homeless that have taken to making their home in the occupation. (Alan Feuer, Juliana Kim and Byron Smith for NY Times)

Kudos to Sasha Baron Cohen, who hasn’t let the pandemic stop him from freaking out Rudy Giuliani so badly that he called the police. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

An overview of The Montefiore Family Resilience Fund, which supplies assistance for households that have lost a breadwinner or caregiver to Covid-19. The fund will assist 375 families. (Norwood News)

Officer Ernie Moran, an off-duty NYPD cop was arrested in Queens during the early hours Wednesday morning for harassing and stalking his ex-girlfriend. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Mayor de Blasio’s cuts to the NYPD included killing off the parking placard abuse unit, ensuring that he will do absolutely nothing as a mayor to end this form of low-level corruption from the NYPD. The mayor and the City Council have announced multiple initiatives to curb this type of corruption, but literally nothing has been done so far. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The NYPD has seized streets all across the city that are adjacent to station houses. Why? Don’t ask the mayor, who refuses to confront the NYPD on this theft of public space. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Is the Staten Island Ferris wheel returning from the dead? The details haven’t been released, but it seems like a smaller version of the original idea might still have life. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Financial struggles brought on by the coronavirus pandemic will keep 15 Catholic schools across New York City closed for good. (Alex Mitchell and Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA is turning to the public for ideas for how to keep trains and buses virus-free. Have any ideas? (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

A look at the work of the Brooklyn Conviction Review Unit, whose job it is to correct hundreds of years of wrongful convictions in Brooklyn of Black and Latinx Brooklynites. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

“We take responsibility for what happens in our stores—both on and off our sales floors—and we are committed to doing the work to improve how we treat our employees and customers.” Greenlight Bookstore co-owners Rebecca Fitting and Jessica Stockton-Bagnulo have made a public apology for creating an unwelcoming environment for Black customers and employees. (Brooklyn Reader)

15 New York City pools that will be reopening in August. (Jenna Fanelli for amNewYork Metro)

Here’s what a car-free, pedestrian-friendly NYC could look like., according to a plan from Architect Vishaan Chakrabarti and his firm Practice for Architecture and Urbanism. (Davin Gannon 6sqft)

Another look at the mass die-offs of fish in the Hudson river. A combination of sewage being dumped into the waters, lack of rain, and the heat are creating an extreme situation leading to the massive deaths of fish. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Wo Hop returns today for takeout orders. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Who isn’t filling out their census forms? It might be the rich. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Jose Barrera, a 50-year-old Brooklyn man was fatally run over in Borough Park while unloading his car outside his home on Saturday night. The driver was taken into custody, passed a DWI test, and was released without being charged Barrera is the 29th pedestrian to be killed by someone driving a car in 2020. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Video: Drone footage of NYC’s Black Lives Matter murals. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Alt-side parking is suspended until July 19. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

22 public libraries in the city are reopening today. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

14 unique outdoor dining options. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Nai for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for December 11, 2019 – The “See Something, Cease & Desist Something” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: SantaCon’s party yachts have been canceled, witchy holiday markets, ask a librarian, the Trash Train contest finds a winner, and more

Today – Low: 27˚ High: 39˚
Light snow in the morning.

Here’s what to expect with next month’s sweeping bail reforms. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

Comparing someone to David Duke doesn’t speak highly of them. When it’s one of the NYPD’s top cops? That’s the comparison made to Deputy Inspector Constantin Tsachas for comments he made about NYPD officers targeting black and Latinx men on the subways. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

A new law will force some new constructions and renovations to use glass that is bird-friendly, to prevent birds from accidentially killing themselves by hitting the glass. The NYC Audobon Society estimates 90,000 – 230,000 birds die in the city due to window collisions. (Ryan F. Mendelbaum for Gizmodo)

Let’s check in on those adorable red-tailed hawks in Tompkins Square Park.. OHGOD IT IS EATING THAT PIGEON. (Laura Goggin Photography)

The MTA’s “See Something, Say Something” slogan is trademarked and they are happy to send cease and desist letters to other cities. Enjoy your C&D, Buffalo. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

SantaCon’s five free party yachts, sponsored by Fireball whiskey, were canceled thanks to concern from City Councilmember Keith Powers, State Senator Brad Hoylman, and Assembly Member Harvey Epstein. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Not all things have been discovered, until now. Congrats are in order to Joe Dator, who has discovered the two hot dog bun. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

The fleet of dollar vans have a new app and an aim to disrupt the city’s buses. (Kimko de Freitas-Tamura for NY Times)

Why is it necessary for the City Council to compel the NYPD to prioritize on towing illegally parked vehicles? Ah, here it is. It’s part of the attempt to crack down on parking placard abuse, a favorite pastime of the NYPD. (Rocco Vertuccio for NY1)

Andres “Andy” Fernandez was found guilty of second-degree murder of L&B Spumoni Gardens owner Louis Barbati. He faces 25 to life when sentenced next month. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

11 witchy, queens, and unique holiday markets. (Cassidy Dawn Graves for Bedford + Bowery)

The founder of Barstool Sports David Portnoy, SantaCon if it were a person, is opening a pizzeria. He’s being investigated by the National Labor Relations Board for threats of firing employees who discussed unionization, he’s made a habit of threatening and harassing female reporters, and is all around disease. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

New York state lost a lawsuit against Exxon-Mobile that claimed the company engaged in fraud through its statements about how it accounted for the costs of climate change regulation. (John Schwartz for NY Times)

Got a question and don’t feel like Googling? Call an NYPL librarian. (Great Big Story)

Tin Pan Alley, a part of 28th between Broadway and Sixth, is now recognized as a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. Tin Pan Alley is the birthplace of American popular music. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The laminated pollo bar, the limoncello pistachio bar, and the rest of the the five must-eat items from Brooklyn’s all-day cafe explosion. (Nikitia Richardson for Grub Street)

Got a better name for Bridge & Tunnel Park in Long Island City? The Parks Department is looking for ideas. (Kristen Torres for LIC Post)

Rudy Giuliani, the mayor-turned-goblin, and estranged wife Judith have come to a settlement to avoid a divorce trial. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

Staten Island’s Republican City Council Members Joe Borelli and Steven Matteo are introducing legislation to create a task for to explore a Staten Island secession. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Essex Crossing is hiding a nasty secret: A Vision Zero nightmare on the East side of the development. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A look at the appalling conditions of the apartments that the homeless of New York City have been assigned in Newark. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure has never been more true than the trash treasures found at the bottom of the Gowanus Canal that will eventually find a home in a museum. (Gowanus Lounge)

Here’s the winner of the “Trash Train” photo contest held by the Transport Workers Union Local 100. The photo is of the aftermath of someone dropping a deuce between subway cars. The contest was held to highlight the need to add back cleaning jobs that cut back the times trains are cleaned by 50%. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Interested in the rest of the Trash Train entries? With photo titles like “Fluids?,” “Two Puddles of Vomit,” and “Number 2 done expressly on the #2 Express,” click the link at your own risk. (Train Train)

Pete Wells’s top 10 new restaurants in the city. (Pete Wells for NY Times)

Congrats to the winners of this year’s Eater Awards for restaurant of the year, design of the year, and bakery of the year. (Eater)

Thanks to Mary von Aue for today’s featured image

The Briefly for September 16, 2019 – The “JUUL Miss Me When I’m Gone” Edition

Late-night subway disruptions, the MTA’s ballooning budget, the weekly restaurant closures, Rudy Giuliani’s divorce gets messy, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

It’s a short list of subways that will be disrupted late nights this week. Even still, if you’re on the 1, 4, A, E, or R trains, you’ll want to check before you make late-night plans. (Subway Weekender)

It’s possible that the Cuomo-Byford feud may be softening. (Politico)

The city will allow bicyclists to ride past the United Nations during the General Assembly, a departure from previous years. It still won’t be easy. Each bicyclist will have to pass a security checkpoint before proceeding. (Streetsblog)

The governor announced the state will ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes with an emergency ruling. (Politico)

The city will be showing off some early design concepts for the Sunnyside Yards. (Sunnyside Post)

The city is calling its renovation of Fort Greene “routine work” to avoid doing a full environmental review. The Sierra Club is leading a lawsuit against the city for the classification and lack of review. (Patch)

The photos of Battery Park as a wheat field are weird. In 1982 there were two acres of wheat planted as an art installation which also yielded a thousand pounds of wheat. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA was headed for a $392 million budget gap in 2020, but that was before the MTA decided to hire 500 additional police officers. (Politico)

The MTA’s on-time performance rate hit 84% last month from 68% the previous August. The future of the MTA is all in the 2020-2024 capital plan, which hasn’t been made public and will be voted on on October 1. (6sqft)

Where to have a last-minute fancy dinner. (The Infatuation)

“I’m sad to know that the hero of 9/11 has become a liar.” Is anyone surprised that Rudy Giuliani’s divorce is a huge mess? (Splinter)

Luxury apartments are changing the city’s skyline, but they aren’t selling. 25% of the luxury apartments built since 2013 have never been sold. (Gothamist)

Speaking of luxury apartments, there will be 700 new luxury apartments will be built in Dumbo as part of a development on a three-acre parking lot. (NY Times)

A class-action lawsuit over a lack of wine coolers in luxury apartments in Hudson Square. (Patch)

Here are this week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health. No one hit over 100 points, but the Eataly kiosks in Flatiron had the highest violation score. (Patch)

The mayor is fighting back against allegations that his sudden embrace of restricting hotel development in the city has something to do with a presidential endorsement from the Hotel Trades Council union. (Politico)

Would you love to brunch at the new TWA Hotel but don’t want to travel like a peasant to get there? Well, now you can take a private helicopter to brunch from lower Manhattan. (Time Out)

After a few weeks of confusion, the state has clarified that landlords and brokers are both going to be held to the new $20 application fee limit. Before the ruling, agents were charging high fees because a landlord wasn’t allowed to. (Gothamist)

A man with a sword was arrested at the observation deck of the Empire State Building. (amNY)

It’s the kind of trash talk you need to see to believe. (@edenbrower)

Whoops, an NYPD school safety officer was arrested for possession of three pounds of marijuana. (SI Live)

Are you the person who bought a $10 million lotto ticket in the Bronx? (Welcome2TheBronx)

Sometimes trash is old food and mile-long CVS receipts. Sometimes it’s 20,000 slides of fashion shows from the 1980s. (Jezebel)

22 places for a stellar meal in Soho. (Eater)