The Briefly for April 16, 2019 – The “Birds Are Cool and Trash Pandas are Getting Vaccinated” Edition

The city’s fight again measles continues with a preschool shutdown, a pipeline threatens Rockaway Beach, New York pizza in the Virgin Islands, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

CompStat, the focus of a recent ReplyAll episode, is being blamed in a $70 million lawsuit by a Brooklyn family against the NYPD for harassment and a false arrest. (Daily News)

The MTA can tout percentages of trains that have had improving performance, but the truth of the matter is that Monday morning’s commute was a nightmare for the A, C, E, F, M, J, and G trains. (Gothamist)

Now that birds are as cool as a street corner shaved ice, here are sixteen of the best bird-watching spots in the city. (Curbed)

Webster Hall is reopening this month and the first show was announced: Jay-Z. (BrooklynVegan)

This makes no small claim, but Eater has a profile of the women who make New York’s “most perfect tortillas.” (Eater)

107 years (and a day) after the Titanic sunk and 21 years after Kate Winslet let Leonardo DiCaprio die, here are ten city sites that connect New York to the sunken ship. (6sqft)

Ten places to visit in the city for a “small town” feel. (Untapped Cities)

President Trump’s executive order expediting gas pipelines is hitting close to home, with the Williams Northeast Supply Enhancement, which is proposed to run from Pennsylvania and terminate close to Rockaway Beach. Opponents say the project will threaten the harbor and marine life in the area. (QNS)

New York may have been able to fight off Amazon, but Jeff Bezos is still eyeing property. Rumor is he’s looking to spend $60 million on a new apartment, which would be a few blocks from other apartments he owns. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The death of Nipsey Hussle inspired a march for peace over with hundreds of current and former gang members in the South Bronx. (Gothamist)

The second-tallest building in the Western Hemisphere is moving forward. The building will require special permits, but if it’s allowed it will be 1,556 feet tall and the 18th “supertall” tower to be constructed in the last dozen years. (6qsft)

What is the cost of a measles outbreak? A single outbreak can cost an individual nearly $10,000 and more than $5 million for a community. (The Indicator from Planet Money)

The city shut down a preschool program at a Brooklyn yeshiva for violating the Health Department order that requires them to have a corrective action plan for measles. (NY Times)

A lawsuit claims that the measles outbreak in the city isn’t an emergency and demanding a restraining order on the mayor’s mandatory vaccination rule that went into effect last Tuesday. There have been 285 confirmed measles cases in Williamsburg since October. (Gothamist)

If your day has been stressful, take a moment to watch Maxine the Fluffy Corgi fight to stay awake while riding the subway. (Viewing NYC)

While new explicitly New York, it is New York pizza related. The best restaurant in the U.S. Virgin Islands is a New York pizza food truck boat in Christmas Cove. (Atlas Obscura)

All seven BQE rehab plans, explained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

City Winery, which will lose its current location when Disney’s offices eat the West Village, will have a new home in early 2020 at Hudson River Park’s Pier 57. (Eater)

Brooklyn Bride Park’s spring and summer lineup was announced, including a kite festival, the MET Opera, stargazing, a more. (Bklyner)

The Met Museum’s new rooftop installation “Parapivot” touches on the interstellar, Manhattan’s grid, and is meant to invoke a connection to “the multiverse above and around us, too.” (amNY)

No one wants to pay full price, and that includes State Senator Andrew Gounardes. Gounardes is arguing that Brooklyn residents who frequent the Verrazzano bridge should receive a discount. The discount for Staten Island residents was put in place because it seemed unfair to charge full price for every single way to get in or out of the borough. There are many roads in and out of Brooklyn. (Bklyner)

Here’s a stunning time-lapse of the Manhattan skies after a snowstorm. (Scott Segler)

The NYCHA’s inspection of 135,000 apartments for lead hazards begun this week. At the current rate, the inspections are scheduled to end before 2020. The mayor has not appointed a new NYCHA chair since the deadline passed on April 1. (amNY)

Portions of the city’s trash panda population will be vaccinated for rabies. No lawsuits are expected as a result of the vaccine implementation. (Gothamist)

The American Museum of Natural History canceled the gala that would have honored Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil’s asshole president. Sorry Brazil, we can only deal with one asshole president at a time. (Gothamist)

Lyft plans on integrating Citi Bikes into the main Lyft app starting in May, which will allow you to pay for your bike and ride in one app. It’s also a good way to educate New Yorkers that Lyft owns Motivate, Citi Bike’s parent company. (Patch)

It was the parents and not City Hall that successfully desegregated schools in District 3 and 15 when the city seemed to be incapable of doing so while the rest of the city’s education system remains one of the most segregated in the nation. (NY Times)

After three deaths on construction sites this week the City Council is pushing for the implementation of a construction safety training law passed in 2017. (Queens Crap)

The best Omakase sushi in the city, ranked by price. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for April 9, 2019 – The “Ignoring the Most Serious Health Violations” Edition

The NYPD demands an exemption to congestion pricing, wildlife BINGO, a chubby cat needs a home, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Want to play NYC wildlife BINGO? (Gothamist)

14 places to view cherry blossoms trees. (Untapped Cities)

73% of the most serious restaurant health violations go unchecked. Just cook your own food from here on out. (Eater)

The NYPD is demanding they should be exempt from congestion pricing. Not the cop cars, their personal cars. (Streetsblog)

Watch this NYPD officer run a red light on an illegal dirt bike without a helmet in front of a bunch of other cops cheering him on and crash, hitting the pavement HARD while trying to avoid getting hit by traffic. (@_scottjohnson)

Some of the most reckless NYPD drivers in the city are in Canarsie. (Streetsblog)

Take a look at the Tokyo neighborhood that inspired Hudson Yards. (6sqft)

The 9/11 Memorial Glade section of the 9/11 Memorial, dedicated to people with 9/11-related illnesses, will open at the end of May. (Curbed)

The estranged husband of the Staten Island teacher found dead and burnt inside a storage unit last week was formally accused of killing her along with his girlfriend. (Gothamist)

Is it time to finally look into extending the 4 train past the Utica Ave station? $5 million was allocated to a study in 2015 and the MTA just got around to getting it started. (Curbed)

Trying to discover the best burger in NYC. (Food Insider)

The five best picnic spots in the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez is open to the decriminalization of prostitution and would be open to a law that would legalize sex work. This is the same man who decriminalized marijuana in Brooklyn. (Gay City News)

Save this photo of old Penn Station from 1910 just in case you ever have to step foot in the dilapidated toilet that sits underneath Madison Square Garden. (Viewing NYC)

The mayor’s plan to turnaround schools with the Renewal program had a statistically insignificant effect on the targeted schools, but it was great at spending money. $773 million to be precise. The mayor said the results would be “fast and intense.” Half of the schools closed. (Chalkbeat)

Were #1! #1 in Lyme disease infections. (Patch)

This chubby cat needs a home. All 41 pounds of him. (Gothamist)

RIP Bob Slade, the creator and legendary radio host of the call-in program “Open Line.” (NY Times)

The mystery of why “1922 HYATT” was found on a nearly century-old subway wall has been solved. (amNY)

The street corner in Brooklyn where impaling pumpkins is de rigueur. (Atlas Obscura)

Add it to the list of deadly New York nightmares. A construction worker died on Monday morning after a piece of the building he was working on broke off and struck him on the head. (Gothamist)

The city ordered yeshivas to bar students who have not received the measles vaccine. (NY Post)

The reason electric bikes and scooters aren’t legal in New York? Blame Manhattan. (Streetsblog)

Here’s where to BYOB. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 27, 2019 – The “Legal Marijuana is No Longer A Sure Thing” Edition

What we know about congestion pricing, two new food halls, Broad City’s NYC, coyotes in Central Park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s what we know about the proposed congestion pricing plan. (NY Times)

Midtown is getting protected bike lanes on 52nd and 53rd. The proposal has the support of Community Board 5’s transportation panel and likely have support from the full board. (Streetsblog)

Marijuana legalization appears to be in jeopardy as Albany seems to be ready to shoot itself in the foot when it comes to something that seemed like a sure thing only a few months ago. (Gothamist)

A salute to one of the city’s cheapest and possibly most delicious sandwich categories. (Curbed)

So this guy was just walking around Brooklyn carrying a loaded AR-15 rifle inside a rolling suitcase? Yup. (Gothamist)

A look inside Cipriani’s new 28,000 square foot Upper West Side food hall. (Eater)

Speaking of food halls, Time Out’s DUMBO food hall vendor list has been revealed. (6sqft)

Other People’s Trash is a vintage clothing shop run out of the back of an RV. Yes, it’s in Bushwick. How did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

The average bonus in the city’s securities industry dropped by 17% last year, but it was still more than twice the average salary in the city’s private sector. (Patch)

Bay Ridge is moving towards having its first historic district. (Brownstoner)

If you loved Rosemary’s Tavern in Williamsburg before it shut down in February, you can own a piece of it at auction this weekend. (BrooklynVegan)

The story behind neighborhood names like Spuyten Duyvil, Harlem, Marbil Hill, and more. (Streeteasy)

The New York Times wrote a love letter to itself focused around the photography of Christopher Payne, whose subject was The New York Times. (NY Times)

Central Park is getting wild. Coyotes have been spotted in the park. If you see one while looking for a hot bird, don’t feed it (duh), protect your pets, admire nature’s beauty, and then call 311 right away. (Gothamist)

Welcome to NYC Elizabeth Warren, you’re late for your train. (TMZ)

The city council is still trying to reign in the floating billboards that have been plaguing the city’s waterways. The latest attempt is a bill that will be introduced on Thursday that will quadruple the fine for violating city zoning rules. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The state is getting ready to ban plastic bags, with a possibility it will be in the April 1 budget (NY Post)

If we could all be as happy as this bag dog, the city would be a better place. (Viewing NYC)

As Broad City comes to a close, here’s a look at some of the city’s most important locations to the show. (Streeteasy)

21.9% of people who took a city bus towards the end of 2018 evaded the fare. Transit President Andy Byford wants to see police on the buses to prevent this instead of making the service something people are willing to pay for. (Patch)

If you’re craving country food in the city, this list is an answer to your southern prayers. (amNY)

Happy 20th anniversary to Forgotten New York. (Forgotten New York)

“We have solid numbers. I think part of the problem has been what people define as a solid number.” Chirlane McCray testified in front of the City Council about ThriveNYC’s seemingly lack of data that tracks the progress of its programs. (amNY)

Robert Cornegy Jr. represents Northern Crown Heights and Bed Stuy on the City Council and is officially the tallest politician in the world. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio’s control of the city’s school system will continue through the end of his term, with the state signing a three-year extension through June of 2022. (NY Post)

Unlike anywhere else in the country, New Yorkers under 44 make more than New Yorkers over 44. Just one of the ney findings from a recent survey from Streeteasy. (Streeteasy)

The Lower East Side’s Luther Gulick Park is getting a $10 million makeover that will complete by September of 2020. Gulick’s place in history stands as the man who encouraged James Naismith to invent basketball. The park will, of course, have a court. (Patch)

19 reliable first date spots in Manhattan. (Eater)

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