The Briefly for April 7, 2020 – The “No, We Are Not Burying Dead Bodies in City Parks” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor ends his open streets program, a guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery, the hardest temp job in the city, weird things people are doing, & more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 64˚
Light rain overnight.

Punk Island, one of the city’s best DIY and free music festivals, is postponed from its usual June date. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Video: A beautifully shot montage of a barren city, titled “The New Normal Quarantine.” (Matt Chirico)

No matter what you read, the city does not have plans to bury the dead in public parks. The rumor originated by Mark D. Levine, the Chair of New York City Council health committee, who spent the entire day on Twitter walking back the mess that he created. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s official body count from COVID-19 of 2,738 is likely a vast undercount. On a “normal” day, about 20-25 New Yorkers die in their homes, but in our new reality, about 200 people are dying at home on a daily basis. Those bodies are not tested for COVID-19, so they are not listed as a confirmed case. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

City schools will continue remote learning on Passover and Good Friday this year, completely removing spring break from the calendar. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

The June Regents exams are canceled. The state is trying to figure out graduation requirements since the Regents is a requirement. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

If the June Regents are canceled, does the June SAT and ACT date stand a chance? (Benjamin Mandile for QNS)

A look inside the slow collapse of the city’s catering industry. (Kaitlin Menza for Grub Street)

If you’re having trouble understanding what being six feet apart looks like, the city is installing signs showing you how far to stay away from your fellow New Yorker. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

I don’t think that when Acting Queens Borough President Sharon Lee accepted a temporary job that she’d be imagining she’d be overseeing the worst-hit county in the country with an election date that was already postponed once. (Todd Maisel for QNS)

If you’re looking for the slightest bit of good news, it seems like the growth of the novel coronavirus outbreak in New York City might be slowing down. (Ann Choi and Yoav Gonen for The City)

Three cheers to the landlords across the city choosing to not demand rent this month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The first jail inmate to test positive for COVID-19 at Rikers Island, Michael Tyson (not the one you’re thinking of), died on Sunday while awaiting a hearing on a parole violation. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

The New York Public Library and WYNC are teaming together to launch a virtual book club, the club is virtual, the book is real. The first book is James McBride’s Deacon King Kong. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Yes, a tiger in the Bronx Zoo has COVID-19. Your pet is probably okay. Just treat them as an extension of yourself. Keep distance from other people and dogs. (James Gorman for NY Times)

Tuesday night will be a pink supermoon, climbing to its highest point at 10:35 pm. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What’s harder than finding a good one-bedroom in a great neighborhood that doesn’t break the bank? Trying to order groceries for delivery. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Your best bets for grocery delivery in the city. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New York is on PAUSE through April 29, a two-week extension. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Video: It’s a touch of history from the end of World War I in Woodhaven. The Memorial Trees were planted after the first world war and were mostly forgotten to time until a few years ago. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

It seems that we’re not good at staying home, according to our location data. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Maybe that’s why 311 received over 4,000 complaints about a lack of social distancing in its first week of receiving complaints. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

New York Cliché, a favorite of The Briefly, is looking for pitches and is paying for posts. She wrote a great piece about getting tickets to late-night talk shows, but then the world went to hell so I never posted it. (Mary Lane for New York Cliché)

Reimagined NYC road signs for our new lives by artist Dylan Coonrad. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A list of NYC restaurants raising funds to feed healthcare workers. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art released a new lineup of free digital programming. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Satire: NYPD Razes Central Park Hospital Tents For Violating Outdoor Encampment Laws. (The Onion)

Performance activist Billy Talen was arrested after planting a rainbow flag on Sunday in protesting Samaritan’s Purse, the anti-gay religious group behind Central Park’s field hospital. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor is ending his “open streets” program after it wasn’t popular enough to justify the heavy NYPD presence at each closed street. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A running list of Mayor de Blasio’s coronavirus response missteps. (Elizabeth Kim, Jen Carlson, and Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 major proposals not included in the state’s new budget. #1? Marijuana legalization. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve done in quarantine? (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The pandemic guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Lisa Rosenblum for submitting today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 2, 2020 – The “Is Governor Cuomo’s Nipple Pierced?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Governor Cuomo shuts down playgrounds, a map of infections by zip code, Ina Garten makes an appropriately sized margarita, free coloring books, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 57˚
Clear throughout the day.

Don’t ask AOC to make a TikTok. (@AOC)

Farmers’ markets are still happening across the city, but with stricter rules. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

The Right to Counsel NYC Coalition and Housing Justice for All have released a guide for tenants interesting in organizing a rent strike. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The NYS Bar Association and the state’s Unified Court System announced they partnered to create a network of pro bono lawyers willing to help out with the surge in legal matters that are expected to come out of the coronavirus pandemic and the likely economic fallout. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

One of the weirder things to come out of this whole pandemic will be the unanswered question “Is the governor’s nipple pierced?” No one is shaming the governor, I think we all need something to distract us from the state of the world for a few moments. (Jelisa Castrodale for Vice)

Sanra Lee, his ex-girlfriend, took to Instagram to talk about it and while she didn’t say they were pierced, she didn’t deny it either. (Charlie Nash for Mediaite)

Queens’ demographics may be the reason why it has become the epicenter of the city’s coronavirus outbreak. (Clodagh McGowan for NY1)

The city released hard numbers of positive COVID-19 cases per zip code, exposing the tale of two cities as wealthy neighborhoods have rates at 44%, while lower-income zip codes have infection rates as high as 77%. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Imagine you move into a 600-square-foot Manhattan shoebox apartment and two days later the two of you are locked down together. (Anne McCarthy for HuffPost)

“I basically want to address the idiots out there, and you know who you are.” Watch Larry David’s COVID-19 PSA. (Devon Ivie for Vulture)

Spring break is canceled for public schools. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“During a crisis, cocktail hour can be almost any hour.” -Ine Garten, hero. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Representatives Carolyn B. Maloney and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez have added their voices to the cause of ending the ban on blood donations from gay and bisexual men. (LIC Post)

The New York City burger delivery guide. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Video: Lower Manhattan’s skyline from 1903 through today. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

In the state’s budget, which passed on Wednesday night, is the legalization of electric bikes and scooters in the state, allowing municipalities to regulate electric bikes. Electric scooters that travel up to 15 miles per hour are legalized. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Also in the budget is a new state campaign finance system, with public matching money for candidates who choose to participate and lower individual contribution limits. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Say farewell to legal weed in 2020. The state failed to put it in the budget last year. A good lesson in not procrastinating. (Rebecca C. Lewis, Amanda Luz Hanning Santiago for City and State)

What New York City looked like, including a startling infographic about daily deaths, during the 1918 flu pandemic. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

You can now call 311 to report physical distancing violations. Of the 289 complaints in Manhattan in the first three days of the week, the NYPD “took action” on 88 of those complaints. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

A man in the Bronx attempted suicide-by-NYPD after receiving a COVID-19 diagnosis. After multiple warnings, the NYPD shot the man in the stomach and is in stable condition at NYC Health & Hospitals/Jacobi. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Former Police Commissioner James O’Neill is returning to public service to be a senior advisor in charge of distributing medical equipment and protective gear to city hospitals. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

210 of Coney Island Hospital’s 317 beds are full of COVID-19 patients and the facility is low on staff, gear, and space, as each employee is being issued one masks every five days. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Mayor de Blasio waivered on closing down the city’s playgrounds, Governor Cuomo did not. All playgrounds, swing sets, basketball courts, and similar spaces are closed. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Mayor de Blasio continues to be a punching bag in the media and doesn’t help himself when his public wavering constantly ends with Governor Cuomo making difficult, but right, decisions. This Times piece starts with an anecdote about Mayor de Blasio walking in Prospect Park on the morning of April 1, which means he was driven from the Upper West Side to Park Slope just to walk in Prospect Park when Central Park is one mile away. (Ben Smith for NY Times)

Love to color? Here are a few free coloring books from NYC artists. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for March 25, 2020 – The “Beneath the Lowest Possible Expectations” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The latest on COVID-19, the NYPD begins to call out sick, a bodega delivery app, Cuomo vs Trump is coming to a head, how to support music venues, and more

Today – Low: 37˚ High: 48˚
Possible drizzle in the afternoon.

The governor demanded the mayor ban cars on city streets to give pedestrians more room and the mayor’s response would be laughable if we could all stop saying “this is so crazy” for just a minute. The mayor will shut down 10 streets with a maximum of two per borough for pedestrian use. Which two streets in each borough? The mayor announced no specifics. Once again, Mayor de Blasio manages to crawl beneath the lowest possible expectations. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

What do you do when someone tests positive for COVID-19 but doesn’t require intensive medical care? The city is grappling with how to encourage physical distancing for the 57,000 homeless people. At the moment, patients are being sent back to the shelter system for isolation. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Over 100 employees of the New York Police Department have tested positive for the coronavirus and nearly 7% of cops have called out sick. It was less than two days ago that TMZ ran the headline “Cops Across The Country Aren’t Scared Of Coronavirus, Used To Danger” (Christopher Mathias for HuffPost)

To add to our current dystopia, the NYPD will be cruising around the city blaring a PSA on social distancing. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Video: One day we’ll look back at this moment and ask “what it even real,” and thankfully we’ll have video evidence, like videos like this bike ride over the Brooklyn Bridge to prove it actually happened. (ActionKid)

New York City from 1993 to 2019, through the camera of Grégoire Alessandrini. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The USNS Comfort, the floating hospital with 1,200 doctors and 12 operating rooms, is “on its way” to the city, but it won’t arrive until mid-April and its focus will be treating non-coronavirus patients, freeing up space in hospitals for COVID-19 patients. (Matt Fink for Bushwick Daily)

NYC Taxi & Limousine Commission is asking taxi and ride-share drivers to deliver food to senior citizens who need to stay home. The city is offering $15 an hour plus gas and tolls, which isn’t much but it’s something. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

Con Edison has announced it has ceased service shutoffs over non-payment, waived new late-payment charges, and suspended fees for customers who fail to grant access to their properties during the coronavirus pandemic. (Robert Pozarycki for Gay City News)

Two things we need at a time like this, both produced in the same place: whiskey and hand sanitizer. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

Now there’s a bodega delivery app. Enter My Bodega Online. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Where’s the state on rent cancellation? There’s a push for it, but Cuomo’s MIA on it. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo has the attention of the nation for his leadership. How did we get here? (Jesse McKinley and Shane Goldmacher for NY Times)

With attention, Cuomo has also become Trump’s latest target in Trump’s never-ending quest to convince us that he, the Emporer, is wearing clothes. (Asawin Suebsaeng, Erin Banco, and Sam Stein for The Daily Beast)

The federal government is sending New York 4,000 ventilators, which is only about 25,000 shy of what the state needs. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The bad news is that we haven’t flattened the curve. The worse news is that COVID-19 has an attack rate five times the national rate in New York and it’s only gonna get worse. There is no good news. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Okay, a tiny bit of good news. With everyone staying at home and not taking cars, carbon monoxide emissions are below 50% of their typical levels. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Congrats Queens, you’re winning the which borough has the most cases of coronavirus competition. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

Manhattan State Senator Brad Hoylman is calling for an end on gay blood donations. (Paul Schindler for Gay City News)

If you’re out of work, these restaurants are offering free or affordable meals. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Help Main Street aggregates restaurant gift cards in one place, even if it’s missing a very large swath of the city. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Photos: We’re nearing I Am Legend territory. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

All of the MTA’s transactions are going to be conducted by MetroCard vending machines, whenever possible. Remember when we were scared of robots taking jobs? (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

If you’re worried that Prospect Park is too crowded, you can take a detour to Green-Wood Cemetery for a moment of serenity away from the living. The cemetery is extending its visiting hours to help prevent you from dying of boredom inside your apartment. (Andrew Cotto for NY Times)

300 of the city’s inmates are scheduled for release to reduce the population density in the city’s jails. The detainees have less than a one-year sentence and were convicted of non-violent misdemeanors and whose age and health make them vulnerable. The city is eyes an additional 800 detainees for possible release. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The MTA is adjusting weekday train and bus schedules to Saturday levels to closer meet the city’s current demand. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

With an occupancy rate as low as 15%, hotels across the city are beginning to temporarily close. (Serena Tara for Bedford + Bowery)

New York City’s teachers union said Tuesday the city health department put educators and students at risk, prior to the city’s system-wide shutdown, by not evenly applying a closure policy for individual schools when a staff member contracted the coronavirus. (Madina Touré for Politico)

David Rockwell, the architect and Tony-winning show designer, talks about the stories and history behind his favorite theaters. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The best ways you can help New York City’s struggling music venues. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The College of Staten Island’s dorms are being emptied of students to become a makeshift hospital. Students who can’t easily find somewhere else to live are being offered rooms in the dorms of other CUNY schools. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

If you’re in self-quarantine with another person, are they a good chef? Here’s what it’s like to self-quarantine with a Michelin-starred chef. (Kaitlin Menza for Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!