The Briefly for May 15, 2020 – The “Quarantining with a Ghost” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Understanding the state’s reopening plans, what rooftop bars may look like on reopening, make a real NYC bagel, the best hospitals, and more

Today – Low: 62˚ High: 79˚
Drizzle in the morning and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 54˚ High: 75˚

A beginner’s guide to understanding New York’s reopening plan. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The City Council’s bill capping fees restaurant delivery apps can charge tops out at 20% and it’s waiting for Mayor de Blasio’s signature. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Let the true 2021 mayoral race begin, as Scott Stringer makes an off-handed remark about Corey Johnson’s predilection for dancing in public. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Happy 100th birthday to Louise Ceci Jacobson, who celebrated with a drive-by parade. (Carlotta Mohamed for amNewYork Metro)

45% of U.S. adults believe in ghosts, but how many of us believe we are quarantining with a specter ? (Molly Fitzpatrick for NY Times)

asian-veggies.com a new Asian produce delivery service in Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan. (Cathy Erway for Grub Street)

Over 100 city kids have PMIS, the pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome, which may be linked to Covid-19. Seventeen total states and six European countries have reported cases and there have been three deaths from PMIS in New York state so far. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

President Trump’s playbook seems to be ‘Ford To City: Drop Dead’ (Paul Blumenthal for HuffPost)

Video: There’s the National Debt Clock, there’s the actual clock in Union Square, and now add the Trump Death Clock in Times Square to the city’s list of infamous clocks. (HuffPost)

Paulo Pinho and Clelia Pinho, the couple charged with a hate crime for allegedly attacking a group of Hasidic men, argue that they are the real victims because the men the allegedly attacked were not social distancing. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Let’s take a moment to celebrate anything that brings us an inch closer to the way life was before mid-March. Dunkins across the city have begun reopening. (Give Me Astoria)

What will dining look like once we’re back? A look to California may provide some answers. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

An unnamed “famous Upper East Side bar and lounge” and a “trendy downtown hotel” have both supposedly held speakeasy parties this week. A risky move, considering the Post already found out, so city officials can’t be too far behind. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Video: Another disturbing NYPD arrest, this time it’s a 22-year-old mother being violently arrested while walking with her toddler. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

You’d be surprised how NYC hasn’t changed int he last century from this aerial photograph from 1933. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Broken machines, staff shortages, a lack of bilingual interpreters, and polling locations that weren’t accessible to the disabled. A report released Thursday by City Comptroller Scott Stringer found “widespread mismanagement and lax recordkeeping” by the city Board of Elections in last year’s general election. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

NYU Langone Medical Center and NYC Health + Hospitals – Metropolitan came out on top of Leapfrog’s list of the best and worst hospitals in NYC. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Twenty community clinics will now make free coronavirus testing available to all people showing symptoms, with an additional 12 clinics scheduled to be added to that list. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Followup to the story about Dr Oxiris Barbot, the city’s health commissioner, and a comment she made to Terence Monahan, the NYPD Chief of Department, Dr Barbot has already apologized. Ed Mullins, the head of the NYPD’s union who is the subject of an NYPD Internal Affairs probe, continues to push on Twitter, having called Dr Barbot a “bitch.” It’s time to move on Ed. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Will rooftop bars still be a thing this summer? Here’s a what they could look like. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

This is NYC’s biggest asshole, who thought dumping a Rubbermaid container of cereal and milk on the subway would be funny. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

Shopsin’s is back at Essex Market. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The schedules for virtual Brooklyn and Queens Pride Month events have been released. (Matt Tracy for amNewYork Metro)

Community health centers in the city will receive $22 million in emergency funds from the federal government to bolster coronavirus testing capacity. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Ahead of expected budget cuts, CUNY is looking to cut its budget by $10 billion, with adjunct professors first on the chopping block. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The meat shortage,” as explained by the city’s meat suppliers. (Kitty Greenwald for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio appointed at least 80 donors to advisory groups that were formed to help shape New York City’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. There are a total of 330 people appointed to the groups. (Anna Sanders for NY Daily News)

As the city creeps towards a reopening, beauty salon owners don’t feel like they have a seat at the table. Maybe they should have donated more to the mayor? (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Frozen on Broadway is closed. The show will not reopen once Broadway returns. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The head of the city’s contract tracing program is the same person who gave Mayor de Blasio advice in March that there was “no proof that closures will help stop the spread,” and believed that large events should have continued as planned. This was happening while the mayor’s top health officials were threatening resignation in protest if the mayor didn’t listen to them. (William K. Rashbaum, J. David Goodman, Jeffery C. Mays and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

10 ways for adding more plants in your NYC apartment. (Localize.City)

This weekend’s project? Make real New York-style bagels at home. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Flo for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for November 13, 2019 – The “Staten Island Revisits Secession from New York City” Edition

The city’s first hair discrimination case is settled, Penn Station is about to get worse, a 22.5-foot arm appears in Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Queens has a new Boulevard of Death, and it’s Jewel Ave. (Streetsblog)

The first hair discrimination case in the city has been resolved. Sally Hershberger and partner Sharon Dorram lost a $70k lawsuit after former workers were told that their hairstyles didn’t fit a dress code, specifically that “afros and box-braid hairstyles did not reflect the upscale image of the neighborhood.” (The Root)

Staten Island wants to secede from NYC. (Gothamist)

Penn Station’s multi-year renovation means that the already depressing station will become even more dour when it loses about 17 businesses including Shake Shack, Magnolia Bakery, two Starbucks, a Pretty and Godiva. (Eater)

Can an opinion be wrong? In the case of the “Can We Talk About Womanspreading?” opinion piece that ran in the Daily News, the answer is yes. Claire Lampen read it, so you don’t have to. (Gothamist)

Last night’s sunset was spectacular. (@mikiodo)

What’s the point of adding 500 cops to the subways to police fare evasion? Rationally minded folks aren’t the only ones asking that question, the MTA’s board is also starting to ask that same question. (Gothamist)

More cops of better service? The number of crimes on the subway are down, no matter what fantasy Governor Cuomo wants to create to justify spending more than half a billion dollars on new subway cops. The governor if you ask 100 people on the subway if they want more cops on the subways, 75 would say yes, so amNewYork went down and started asking. (amNewYork)

Dr. Sun Yat-sen received a monument in Chinatown at Columbus Park, adding Dr Sun’s name to the park’s plaza as well. He was a pioneer in the reform of China in 1911 and the monument has “All Under Heaven Are Equal” inscribed on the pedestal. (amNewYork)

This week is the best week for forest bathing. What’s forest bathing? I don’t really know. It’s kind of like taking a walk in the trees but different? (Gothamist)

The East Side Costal Resiliency (ESCR) project is headed for a full City Council vote on Thursday, which will decide the future of the East River Park and how the Lower East Side is protected from storms and the rising sea. (Curbed)

There are 40 NYCHA developments without gas, some without gas since April. City Comptroller Scott Stringer argues that if gas is not supplied for an extended period of time that the NYCHA should be offering food reimbursement and monthly bill abatements to compensate. (amNewYork)

Is the one minute you can spend inside the “Infinity Mirrored Room” at David Zwirner in Chelsea worth the potentially very long wait? (NY Times)

Looking for restaurants serving Thanksgiving dinner this year? (Patch)

How to choose an apartment based on the school district. (StreetEasy)

With the help of Lin-Manuel Miranda and some Hamilton collaborators, the Drama Book Shop will be opening its new location on W 39th in the spring and operated by the company that operates Hamilton’s gift shop. (NY Times)

Third Ave in Sunset Park between 20th and 30th Streets underneath the Gowanus Expressway is becoming a hub for RV parking. (amNewYork)

A rezoning in Woodside was given the thumbs up by Community Board 2 that will bring 60 apartments to 52nd St near Queens Blvd with parking, a community facility, and commercial space. (Sunnyside Post)

Last weekend saw a spike in hate crimes reported in Brooklyn, most anti-Semitic in nature. (amNewYork)

The National Grid / Governor Cuomo war of words hasn’t ended. The governor once again raised the threat of revoking National Grid’s license to operate in the southern part of the state. (NY Times)

Someone broke into the conductor cab on a 1 train and bean screaming “I have a fucking gun!” into the train’s PA system. Chaos ensued, as you might expect, but no one was found with a gun and no injuries were reported. (Gothamist)

RIP Charlie Gordon. Astoria’s Sandwich King, who established Sal, Kris & Charlie’s Deli in Astoria. (LIC Post)

Unity is a 22.5-foot bronze sculpture of an arm pointing towards the sky in Downtown Brooklyn by Hank Willis Thomas. The piece is “in homage to, and celebration of, the unique and multifaceted character of the borough of Brooklyn. There is one finger raised, but it’s not the Brooklyn salute you might assume. It’s the index finger. (Untapped New York)

Hall & Oates is hitting the road and MSG is on their list for February 28. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Single-Story Project,” from Adam Friedberg on view at the Center for Architecture captures 100 one-story buildings in the East Village and Lower East Side. It seems almost impossible that with the city as dense as it is that there are that many one-story buildings remaining. (Curbed)

Take a look inside Norah Jones’ $8 million circa-1843 Cobble Hill home, which includes a master suite terrace and a hot tub and pool in the backyard. (Curbed)

Are your neighbors’ security cameras spying on you? (NY Times)

The hottest restaurants in Queens this month. (Eater)

The Briefly for August 15, 2019 – The “Renaming Trump Tower’s Address to Barack Obama Avenue” Edition

High-end buildings are competing for the best amenities, the NYPD giving citations for imaginary bike lane laws, another 14th St busway lawsuit and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

As 87% of NYCHA homes were without heat at some point last winter, there is a battle being waged amongst the city’s wealthiest to see who can out-do each other with the highest of high-end amenities. (The Real Deal)

The top twelve secrets of Prospect Park. (Untapped Cities)

Do you want to sign the MoveOn.org petition to rename Fifth Avenue between 56th and 57th “President Barack H. Obama Avenue?” It just so happens that is the block where Trump Tower is located. (MoveOn)

NYC Broadway week is September 3-16, and you can get 2-for-1 tickets to 24 different shows. (amNY)

The city and state’s fight against the federal government about the public charge rule is centered around a ridiculous interpretation of the Emma Lazarus’s sonnet “The New Colossus,” which is inscribed on the Statue of Liberty. (Patch)

Only 5 of the 25 LIRR stations in Queens are not ADA compliant and City Comptroller Scott Stringer wants answers and timelines from the MTA to rectify that. (LIC Post)

In praise of stuffed-crust pizza, Hootie and the Blowfish, and Dirty Dancing on VHS as 500 Pizza Hut stores are set to close. (Grub Street)

State Sen. Andrew Gounardes is looking to craft tougher laws to close the arbitrary distance between killing someone with or without a car being involved. (Brooklyn Paper)

A field guide to the weapons of the city’s hostile architecture. (Gothamist)

13 festivals coming to the city from this week through Columbus Day Weekend. (amNY)

After sharing a very obviously racist video, the Sergeants Benevolent Association President and local racist Ed Mullins literally used the “I have black friends” defense. (Gothamist)

If Patti Smith, Morrisey, or Bruce Springsteen on Broadway aren’t your vibe, maybe Tom Morello Off-Broadway in September is more your speed. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A kitten dodging traffic on the lower level of the George Washington Bridge has a happy story to tell and is now available for adopting in New Jersey. (Gothamist)

Riding a horse on a beach isn’t a “very Brooklyn” thing to do, but it’s totally possible. (NY Times)

New York Public Radio (WNYC, WQXR, WNYC Studios, Gothamist, and the Greene Performance Space) has a new CEO in Goli Sheikholeslami, the current CEO of Chicago Public Media. (Gothamist)

The latest lawsuit against the 14th St busway argues the MTA’s removal of bus stops along the route as part of the select service upgrade violates the Americans with Disabilities Act. (amNY)

169 lawsuits were filed in the city during the first day of the Child Victim’s Act, including cases against the Boy Scouts of America, the Catholic dioceses, and Rockefeller University. (Patch)

Okay, so the summer is coming to a close soon. What do you do with your air conditioner? (Gothamist)

If you’re headed to Jacob Riis beach this Saturday but don’t want to be far from Emmy squared’s delicious Detroit-style pizza, you’re in luck, because the Clinton Hill/Williamsburg pizzeria is “delivering” between 1 and 1:45 pm. (Time Out)

A second NYPD officer committed suicide this week, the ninth NYPD suicide in 2019. A name has not yet been released. (amNY)

Video: Headmistress and burlesque dancer Jo Weldon on found freedom, fun and her calling in underground nightlife. (Huff Post)

A Space Jam mural was painted on the basketball court at Rodney Park North in Williamsburg, but the paint that the Parks Department used made the court slippery and unusable. (Brooklyn Paper)

A sanitation worker swapped out the license plates on his car with a set he found in the trash and almost got away with $17,000 in tickets and fines, but he was caught by the Department of Investigation. (Patch)

From The Onion, but you almost might think it was true: NYPD Tickets Dead Cyclist For Obstructing Bike Lane. (The Onion)

This sounds like it could be The Onion, but this is real. Alex Goldmark (from NPR’s Planet Money) was pulled over on his bicycle and given a citation for riding outside of the bike lane on a street where no bike lane exists, which is not illegal. It would be funny if it weren’t an example of the NYPD not having an understanding of the laws they are supposed to enforce. (Patch)

Time Out updated their list of the “best New York pizzas you have to eat” but #3 is inside of their own food hall, so be wary. (Time Out)