The Briefly for March 14, 2019 – The “Don’t Quit Your Day Job, Mr. Mayor” Edition

Stop and frisk is down but not any less worrisome, the best pies for pi day, a 40 year old murder mystery buried in a Queens backyard, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Stop and frisks are reportedly down 98%. Turns out the remaining 2% are just as problematic as they used to be with only 11% of people stopped being white. (amNY)

From 2001’s plan for the 2012 Olympics to this Friday’s opening, a timeline on the major moments for the Hudson Yards. (Curbed)

In honor of pi day – the best pies in the city. (Grubstreet)

Mayor de Blasio’s budget for 2020 looks like a series of austerity measures for the city. (The Independent)

Forget it Jake, it’s Raccoon Town. (NY Post)

Plenty of New Yorkers give the finger when they’re upset, but taking a finger? That bites. (Gothamist)

Even though no one wants him to run and he’s polling at a literal zero, Mayor de Blasio said he won’t quit his day job if he decides to run for president. (NY Post)

A BQE replacement alternative idea from City Comptroller Scott Stringer: A temporary “trucks only” highway with a park on top. (Gothamist)

After 35 years, Park Slope’s Old Carriage Inn’s last day is St. Patrick’s Day. (Bklyner)

Wolverine is returning to Broadway. (amNY)

There’s an ongoing shortage of blood, and before you begin your partying on Sunday, there’s a blood drive at Our Lady of Mt Carmel Church. (Greenpointers)

No one’s sure how this baby goat ended up on the Gowanus Expressway, but it was safely captured. (Gothamist)

Photos from in and around the Hudson Yard’s ‘Vessel’ sculpture. (Patch)

The best restaurants in Crown Heights. (Grubstreet)

Moishe’s and closing is the Ross and Rachel of 2019. Turns out it’s not closing, despite what Moishe Perl told reporters. It should be open in six to eight weeks after renovations. (Eater)

An interview with Dan Smith, who WILL teach you guitar. (Gothamist)

New York City’s elite were caught up in “Operation Varsity Blues,” they just weren’t Aunt Rebecca on Roseanne. (Gothamist)

Coney Island’s Shore Theater will become a hotel thanks to a thumbs up from the Landmarks Preservation Commission. There’s no timeline yet, but it’ll be good to see that scaffolding come down one day. (Curbed)

It’s the Bronx” is aiming to be the “SXSW of the Bronx.” (6sqft)

Do you deserve your seat on the subway more than someone else? (Gothamist)

You know that body cam recording of an NYPD cop giving her boss a hummer? Yeah, it was a fake. (NY Post)

More Anti-Semitic graffiti, this time in the Nassau Avenue stop on the G train on an ad for a book about the Notorious RBG. (Greenpointers)

The Chrysler… hotel? (Gothamist)

It’s all under a cloak of mystery, but four members of the City Council are under investigation for possible misconduct. (Patch)

Isabella Goodwin: From police matron to the city’s first female police detective. (NY Times)

A farm grows in Brownsville. (The Brooklyn Reader)

How Manhattan’s streets and avenues are numbered. Yes, it’s more than just “Manhattan’s a grid.” (StreetEasy)

The City Council is looking to make the city’s lead inspection regulations the toughest in the nation with a set of 10 new bills. (Patch)

Just a list of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s humanizing moments. (amNY)

The NYPD is investigating a 40-year-old mystery after a body was dug up in a backyard in Queens. (NY Times)

Where to go with someone who’s “just reaching out” to see how you like working at your company. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 4, 2019 – The “We Are All Wet People” Edition

It’s a snow day across the city, SNL’s beautiful Bodega Bathroom musical, a $43,000/month townhouse, how books get picked for the New York Public Library and more in today’s daily NYC digest.

Sixteen people decide which books reach the shelves of the New York Public Library. (NY Times)

SNOW DAY TODAY! (Patch)

We getting mad because it’s winter and it’s snowing outside.” Meet Diane in Brooklyn, your new favorite amateur meteorologist. (@PIX11News)

“You’re the first person to use this bathroom that’s not a dog giving birth.” Bless you SNL for the Bogeda Bathroom skit/musical. (SNL)

It was 33% of the 8.6% of active voters who voted that elected Jumaane Williams to the second most powerful position in the city. Maybe it’s time to change how we elect our officials. (New York Daily News)

An explanation of ranked-choice voting. (CGP Grey)

Fatberg alert! Only flush your four P’s. Quick: Can you name all four P’s? (Bklyner)

Mayor Bill de Blasio, casually tweeting treason against NYC. (@BilldeBlasio)

This is why you would leave the caps on soda bottles when you get rid of them. (Lifehacker)

“Almost every legislator in Albany is furious with Cuomo about something.” This profile of Governor Cuomo is illuminating and includes the tidbit that if Joe Biden doesn’t run for president, Cuomo might. (The Atlantic)

If you pay $43,000/month for a townhouse, you might assume you wouldn’t have a rat problem. (NY Post)

Borough President James Oddo, Congressperson Max Rose, and Councilperson Debi Rose will be boycotting
The Staten Island St. Patrick’s Day parade because of the exclusion of the Pride Center of Staten Island. (NY Post)

10 premiere dim sum parlors. (Eater)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer will be investigating Chirlane McCray’s Thrive initiative after reports of $850 million in spending were made public. (NY Post)

25-year-old Aurilla Lawrence, or “Aurilla Gorilla” to her friends, is the fifth cyclist to die after being hit by a car in 2019. There were 10 total deaths of this type in 2018. (Gothamist)

Does the East London borough of Hackney have the answer to the city’s public housing problem? (NY Times)

A look inside the Lower East Side Ecology Center’s warehouse in Brooklyn which houses a veritable museum of old technology which has become highly sought after by TV and movie producers. (NY Times)

Happy birthday! The best bars to celebrate your birthday. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for December 27, 2018 – The “Losing Your Job Over Poppy Seed Bagels” Edition

An NYPD’s accidental shooting victim sues the city, Long Island City primes its real estate, NYC’s immigration courts are a mess because of the government shutdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Let’s explore some NYC ghost stories, from the hellbeasts, to the Staten Island murder mansion, to the hellmouth at Hell’s Gate. (Gothamist)

There’s a ghost subway tunnel that sits above the Broadway stop on the G. The Second System was an abandoned 1929 expansion of the subway system, which would have included an additional tunnel between Williamsburg and Manhattan. That would have been helpful with the impending shutdown of the L. (Greenpointers)

America’s oldest mosque is just around the corner from the Lorimer stop on the L. (Bedford + Bowery)

The FIRST STEP Act, which is aimed at reforming the federal prison system and reducing recidivism, has roots in New York. US Representative Hakeem Jeffries, who represents parts of Queens and Brooklyn, crafted the bill. (Kings County Politics)

IT’s the most wonderful time of the year: Mulchfest! (6sqft)

If you think that you can’t fail a drug test because of poppy seed bagels, you might want to talk to officer Eleazar Paz. Paz was just reinstated to his post on Riker’s Island after being fired over his failed test in January. (NY Post)

Rising rents will claim Chelsea’s The Half King on January 2 after 18 years. (Eater)

Turns out the Queens podiatrist that helped President Bone Spurs dodge the Vietnam War draft did so for preferential treatment from his landlord: Trump’s daddy. (Gothamist)

A tribute to Larry Eisenberg, The New York Times‘ most prolific commenter (whose 13,000 comments were mostly in limerick form), who died on Tuesday at 99-years-old. (NY Times)

Eight minutes of NYC in the 1920’s. (Viewing NYC)

The home of the $18 coffee has closed. Yes, it was in Brooklyn, how did you know? (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

New York is the 15th state to establish a bill of rights for sexual assault survivors. New protections include the right to consult with a victim assistance organization during physical exams and interviews, examinations, preventive HIV treatment and other services at no cost, among others. (amNY)

The federal immigration courts in the city have been thrown into chaos due to the federal shutdown. The Javitz Building’s immigration court, which has a backlog of 105,000 cases, is closed while the Varick Street court remains open. (Gothamist)

The city’s minimum wage increases on December 31. For employers with 11 or more employees, $15 is the new minimum wage. Companies with less than 11 employees will have a $13.50 minimum wage. (amNY)

82% of shots fired by police miss their targets. Irene Ureña Perez was accidentally shot in the abdomen by one of the 27 shots fired plainclothes NYPD officer Juan Gomez while in pursuit of a suspect in early December. Perez is still recovering, has endured multiple surgeries and is suing the city for $10 million. (Gothamist)

Two of the men who were caught on video allegedly assaulted an NYPD officer on a subway platform in Chinatown have been arrested. (NY Post)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s 2018 transit wishlist. (Streetsblog)

As Long Island City girds itself for the delivery of Amazon’s tech bros, prices on prime real estate are going up. (NY Times)

The top restaurant standbys of 2018. (Eater)

30 New Year’s Eve events $35 and under. (the skint)

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