The Briefly for May 20, 2019 – The “Casting Literal and Figurative Shade” Edition

A legendary pizza place is temporarily closed, Scott Stringer is making his mayoral candidacy clear, the NYPL’s secrets, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are along the 3, 6, A, D and E lines, but double check before you go anywhere after 10pm. (Subway Weekender)

The BQE Rehab panel is asking for feedback. If you want to provide your feedback, there’s a phone number and a form for the kind of constructive, polite feedback New Yorkers are known for. (BQE Panel)

The developer of the building that would cast literal shade on the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is attempting a char offensive campaign to promote the site’s affordable housing. I’m not sure there’s a New Yorker gullible enough to believe that a company would pay $75 million for a plot of land and then build 1,500 apartments (50% would be “affordable”) because they believe in affordable housing. (Gothamist)

From the pneumatic tubes, to the book train, to the actual visible history you can see in the building, ten secrets of the NYPL’s main branch on 42nd St. (Untapped Cities)

Not on the list is the number of empty floors of stacks. There are some parts of the NYPL that can’t safely store its research collection, which has been moved into storage underneath Bryant Park, where its 11 million book collection is safe. (NY Times)

Wave hello to the city’s newest bars and restaurants. (amNY)

The restaurants ordered closed last week, including surprising inclusions Barcade on 24th and Di Fara Pizza in Midwood. (Patch)

Di Fara says it will be reopening today. (Eater)

If you need more proof that the MTA wasn’t prepared for the L Train Slowdown, the initial cuts to the M14’s route have been altered with this “final compromise.” (Curbed)

35 years after opening, Bookbook in Greenwich Village is closing. It’s not the city’s rising rents, but retirement that’s calling the owners. (NY Times)

This Gothamist piece about a protest from contractors over the proposed rent reforms takes a turn midway through, accusing real estate and landlord groups of astroturfing the hearings. (Gothamist)

630 Fifth Avenue. Quickly, what’s the nearest corner? Take off the last number and you’ve got 63. Divide it by 2 and you have 31. Add 20 because it’s over 600 and the answer is 51st St. Finding a cross street used to involve a little math. (Ephemeral New York)

The city lost 7,500 affordable apartments in 2018, but gained 11,800. There’s a catch. 80% of the new apartments’ affordability status is temporary. (The Real Deal)

Brooklyn’s bra whisperer. (NY City Lens)

The Bronx’s Tibbetts Brook was “moved” underground by Robert Moses. As a result of Robert Moses’s brilliant idea, the surrounding area floods when it rains, the flooding overwhelms the sewers and overflow has to be dumped into the Harlem River. The Parks Department has a plan to bring the brook back above ground to remedy this, but a private rail company stands in their way. (Gothamist)

If you’re unfamiliar with the Combined Sewage Overflow system, the city collects rainwater in its sewer system, and when the combination of rainwater, human waste, and whatever else on the street overload the sewer system, it dumps out in the NYC waters in 13 locations, dumping 377 million gallons of raw sewage into our waters. (Newsweek)

This is why the city closely monitors the water at the city’s beaches for sewage runoff. Beaches were on warning for 49 days in 2018 with one closure. The Swim Guide and website is also available for water condition reports. (nyc.gov and The Brooklyn Eagle)

Notify NYC now offers transit alerts. Why would you want transit alerts from the Department of Emergency Management, a city agency, instead of the MTA, a state agency, or one of the dozens of transit apps? No idea. A quick look shows that the Notify system doesn’t have the same breadth of coverage as @NYCTsubway on twitter. (amNY)

It shouldn’t be to anyone’s surprise at the width of the chasm of difference between the rezoning plans of the Department of City Planning and the Bushwick Community Plan for Bushwick’s future. (Bklyner)

Normal people put up curtains or shades in their bathrooms so people can’t watch them poop. Alex Rodriguez does not appear to be a normal person, or else this photo of A-Rod taking a deuce wouldn’t be on the internet. (Gothamist)

Morgenstern’s is adding a twist to its flagship ice cream location on Houston: booze. (Eater)

The most popular baby names in NYC are Liam, Noah, Jacob, Emma, and Olivia. Not many future kinds named Bran. (Patch)

Turns out the TWA hotel wasn’t actually as ready for visitors like it should have been. (Gothamist)

If you want to attract birds, here are the plants for you to grow. (Patch)

. Turns out the MTA is as good at maintaining its toilets as it is its subways. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard ferry stop opens today. (Brooklyn Paper)

Scott Stringer, who has clearly been making a visibility play to run for mayor, says a new tax on the city’s largest businesses could expand subsidies for childcare for 84,000 kids younger than 3. (Patch)

The best cocktails under $10. (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for May 17, 2019 – The “The Mayor is Bored of New York and Hates Being Mayor” Edition

Broad coverage of our mayor’s inadvisable run for president, the best beach day trips, Corey Johnson’s criminal justice reforms, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subways don’t look any worse than normal, with some diversions for the Brooklyn Marathon on Saturday. The 1, 3, J, and A trains all terminate early (no trains to Rockaway Beach, only buses and ferries). (Subway changes)

The best beach day trips from NYC. (6sqft)

“A former top aide for De Blasio told me this is exactly right: He is utterly bored and hates being mayor. He doesn’t expect to win but he just wants to get out of NYC.” (@eisingerj)

Ugh, he’s running for president. (NY Times)

The mayor’s campaign video, featuring him being chauffeured around the city in an SUV, had a theme of “working people first.” (Splinter)

The New York Times actually found someone who vocally supports the mayor’s presidential bid, which means she is one of the 25% of New Yorkers that aren’t opposed to him running. (NY Times)

The video alsofeatures the Brooklyn Promenade, the area the mayor proposed tearing down and replacing with a temporary six-lane highway. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Meet Dean Fuleihan, the city’s deputy and de facto mayor when ours decides that he’s bored fo the city and wants to leave. (NY Times)

Streetsblog has the right idea. With his presidential run, it is time for the mayor to resign. (Streetsblog)

It’s good to remember that the mayor has no control over the subways, and according to the Citizens Budget Commission if he did, it would be “too much pressure” and “miserable.” (Streetsblog)

Mayor de Blasio hasn’t even resigned out of boredom yet and Corey Johnson just earned his first endorsement for mayor. (City and State NY)

Corey Johnson announced on Thursday a package of proposals aimed at reforming New York City’s criminal justice system to be more fair and equitable, building on changes championed by progressive politicians and advocates in New York and Albany over the last several years. (Gotham Gazette)

The most splurge-worthy city restaurants, according to 14 chefs. (Grub Street)

Forest Hills and Riverdale topped the list of the best neighborhoods for first-time buyers. (Curbed)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (NY Times)

Gothamist tested the lead levels in various parks around the city, and you’re not gonna be thrilled with the results. Especially if you go to the Prospect Park Bandshell. (Gothamist)

“Everything” you need to know about eating and drinking at the TWA Hotel. (Grub Street)

A look at a vintage map of the mall at the World Trade Center pre-2001. (Viewing NYC)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer is calling for free abortion care for all people who can’t afford it. He’s seeking $250,000 out of the city’s $92.5 billion proposed budget for the New York Abortion Access Fund. People with VA coverage or federal workers cannot use their medical insurance for abortion care and this would also cover visitors and tourists as well. (Gothamist)

Time to hit Tinder on W 72nd St. Seven summer date ideas on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The state’s legislature is ready to force the MTA to install elevators at any subway station undergoing a closure or renovation that would last at least six months. The bill is targeted at the MTA’s “Enhanced Station Initiative” which has been closing stations across the city for changes that are considered largely cosmetic. (amNY)

“Where can bad bitches on vacay dine ‘Sex and the City’ style?’ Blass Kayla Kumari Upadhaya, who actually answered this reader question for Eater. (Eater)

Take a look at the new renderings of Penn Station’s new main entrance. (Curbed)

I. M. Pei passed away at 102 on Thursday, but the city still bears the famed architect’s fingerprint. (Curbed)

The best happy hours in Manhattan. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for March 14, 2019 – The “Don’t Quit Your Day Job, Mr. Mayor” Edition

Stop and frisk is down but not any less worrisome, the best pies for pi day, a 40 year old murder mystery buried in a Queens backyard, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Stop and frisks are reportedly down 98%. Turns out the remaining 2% are just as problematic as they used to be with only 11% of people stopped being white. (amNY)

From 2001’s plan for the 2012 Olympics to this Friday’s opening, a timeline on the major moments for the Hudson Yards. (Curbed)

In honor of pi day – the best pies in the city. (Grubstreet)

Mayor de Blasio’s budget for 2020 looks like a series of austerity measures for the city. (The Independent)

Forget it Jake, it’s Raccoon Town. (NY Post)

Plenty of New Yorkers give the finger when they’re upset, but taking a finger? That bites. (Gothamist)

Even though no one wants him to run and he’s polling at a literal zero, Mayor de Blasio said he won’t quit his day job if he decides to run for president. (NY Post)

A BQE replacement alternative idea from City Comptroller Scott Stringer: A temporary “trucks only” highway with a park on top. (Gothamist)

After 35 years, Park Slope’s Old Carriage Inn’s last day is St. Patrick’s Day. (Bklyner)

Wolverine is returning to Broadway. (amNY)

There’s an ongoing shortage of blood, and before you begin your partying on Sunday, there’s a blood drive at Our Lady of Mt Carmel Church. (Greenpointers)

No one’s sure how this baby goat ended up on the Gowanus Expressway, but it was safely captured. (Gothamist)

Photos from in and around the Hudson Yard’s ‘Vessel’ sculpture. (Patch)

The best restaurants in Crown Heights. (Grubstreet)

Moishe’s and closing is the Ross and Rachel of 2019. Turns out it’s not closing, despite what Moishe Perl told reporters. It should be open in six to eight weeks after renovations. (Eater)

An interview with Dan Smith, who WILL teach you guitar. (Gothamist)

New York City’s elite were caught up in “Operation Varsity Blues,” they just weren’t Aunt Rebecca on Roseanne. (Gothamist)

Coney Island’s Shore Theater will become a hotel thanks to a thumbs up from the Landmarks Preservation Commission. There’s no timeline yet, but it’ll be good to see that scaffolding come down one day. (Curbed)

It’s the Bronx” is aiming to be the “SXSW of the Bronx.” (6sqft)

Do you deserve your seat on the subway more than someone else? (Gothamist)

You know that body cam recording of an NYPD cop giving her boss a hummer? Yeah, it was a fake. (NY Post)

More Anti-Semitic graffiti, this time in the Nassau Avenue stop on the G train on an ad for a book about the Notorious RBG. (Greenpointers)

The Chrysler… hotel? (Gothamist)

It’s all under a cloak of mystery, but four members of the City Council are under investigation for possible misconduct. (Patch)

Isabella Goodwin: From police matron to the city’s first female police detective. (NY Times)

A farm grows in Brownsville. (The Brooklyn Reader)

How Manhattan’s streets and avenues are numbered. Yes, it’s more than just “Manhattan’s a grid.” (StreetEasy)

The City Council is looking to make the city’s lead inspection regulations the toughest in the nation with a set of 10 new bills. (Patch)

Just a list of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s humanizing moments. (amNY)

The NYPD is investigating a 40-year-old mystery after a body was dug up in a backyard in Queens. (NY Times)

Where to go with someone who’s “just reaching out” to see how you like working at your company. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.