The Briefly for June 10, 2019 – The “Bill Becomes A Law Without Mayor de Blasio’s Signature” Edition

The OMNY finds success, a plan for Rikers that isn’t luxury apartments, even Sesame Street knows how rough the subways are, the MoMA’s closing and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late nights this week the Brooklyn-count N train takes up R duties after Whitehall, the F is local in Queens, and more reasons you should double check before going anywhere after 11pm. (Subway Weekender)

The full list of winners from last night’s Tony Awards. Hadestown was this year’s big winner with eight awards. (Variety)

Ride shotgun with Cynthia Erivo, while she gets ready for the awards. (NY Times)

A 22-year-old man was arrested on Thursday and arraigned on Friday for buying weapons for an alleged terrorist attack in Times Square. Turns out when he went to purchase weapons, it was from undercover agents. (amNY)

The city’s new Vision-Zero bill will turn into law, no thanks to the mayor. Instead of taking a moment during the brief times when he’s actually in the city where he’s the top official, Mayor de Blasio is allowing the bill to lapse into law. After 30 days, any unsigned bills in the city don’t need the mayor’s signature. (Streetsblog)

Of course, the former East Village home of the Hell’s Angels is becoming a 22-story residential tower with retail on the first floor. (EV Grieve)

Inside the new Pastis, and inside the celebrity-heavy family and friends (and press) preview dinner. (Eater)

Less than a year after opening in a new location, Barbara is playing MSG in August. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A restaurant group is fighting a city bill that would give all New Yorkers who work for a business with five or more employees two weeks of annual paid vacation. The argument from the state’s restaurant association is that it will kill the city’s restaurants. The argument from people who don’t own restaurants is that if you can’t afford to treat your employees fairly and with decency, maybe you shouldn’t run a business. (Eater)

There’s a new installation at the Oculus, a live rice paddy. (Untapped Cities)

The city celebrated Puerto Rico on Sunday with a parade down Fifth Avenue without one notable participant. Everyone except the mayor wasn’t there, choosing to campaign in Iowa instead. (amNY and Patch)

Maybe he should have stayed home. A recent poll had literally no one from Iowa choosing the mayor as their top pick, a feat he shares with Wayne Messam. Who? Exactly. (amNY)

Down below the street can you gid a steady beat, it’s the subway.” Even a Sesame Street song about the subway from 1975 bemoans random express trains, overcrowding, a lack of air conditioning and general rudeness. Plus, it’s a catchy song. (Sesame Street)

There’s a reason Coney Island is known as the “Sodom by the Sea,” and it ain’t crooked games of chance. The epicenter was “The Gut,” where Trump VIllage is today. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“We looked at it under the surgical microscope, and the best way I can describe it to you is that it was this very small, encapsulated lesion that basically looked like a quail egg.” If you’re squeamish, don’t read this story about how a tapeworm baby ended up inside this woman’s brain. (Gothamist)

You have until Saturday to see the MoMA before it closes for four months for expansion. (Curbed)

How did the boroughs get their names? (amNY)

Brauley De La Rosa, the guy who rammed a cyclist with his car during an argument is an FDNY officer and he says both the eye-witness reports and the video was “blown out of proportion.” Who among us hasn’t attempted to run someone over with our cars during an argument? (Gothamist)

A new bill will re-classify car wash workers as employees who should be receiving the minimum wage instead of treating them as tipped workers. Even with tips, workers usually make less than the soon-$15 minimum. The bill only requires the governor’s signature. (Jackson Heights Post)

“Why don’t you learn English?” Four families are suing the city for failing to provide with translation services for their disabled children. (Gothamist)

A roundup of the city’s newest beers and beer related happenings for the summer. (amNY)

Meet Saadiq Newton-Boyd, the New York City king of Pokemon GO. (Bedford + Bowery)

An illustrated guide to helping the city’s cats. (Gothamist)

Cases of measles have risen to 566 in the city, but as expected, the number of cases in Sunset Park outside of the Orthodox Jewish communities has mostly been contained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Never under-estimate a New Yorker’s desire to not take out their wallet. This is why the OMNY system will work. Usage is currently 3x the projections. (Gothamist)

If you’re into the idea of a 130-mile bike race, yes a race and not a ride, then The Brooklyn Red Caps are probably for you. A group with a history that dates back to the 70s, the Red Caps’ grueling journeys take them to Pennsylvania, upstate, Montauk and New Jersey. (NY Times)

RIP Nicky Barnes, the ‘Mr. Untouchable’ of Heroin Dealers. (NY Times)

7 takeaways from the disciplinary case or Daniel Pantaleo, the man whose actions may have lead to the death of Eric Garner. (NY Times)

Don’t put anything past real-estate developers, which is why the city council is readying bills to repurpose Rikers Island when it closes with a solar farm and wastewater treatment facility. (HuffPost)

It’s appalling to have to fight for full funding of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund, but here we are in 2019. (amNY)

Inside the stealth campaign for “responsible” rent reform, the efforts lead by landlords to attempt to stop the state’s attempts to totally rewrite the city’s rent laws. (NY Times)

Real food made by real people served to the city’s children. The point of view from the NYC Healthy School Food Alliance is not hard to understand. (amNY)

The American Museum of Natural History breaks ground on the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation this week. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo is calling the MTA’s management a “failure” after that new timeclock meant to prevent overtime fraud was installed in Queens. It should be noted that the governor technically oversees the MTA. (amNY)

The top restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 2, 2019 – The “The MTA, Like A Fish, Rots From the Head Down” Edition

A proposed constitutional right to clean air and water, the city’s best new restaurant, kick Lena Dunham out of Brooklyn, billionaires fight to keep the SHSAT, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The state senate passed a handful of environmentally friendly bills, including S.2072 is a bill in the state Senate that would add a constitutional right to clean air and water to the state’s constitution. (Grist)

A look under the microscope at a few of New York City’s billions of bacteria, fungi and microbes. Germophobes need not apply. (Business Insider)

The MTA’s board fails to reflect the city at every opportunity. The median income of the MTA board is $555,000, which is roughly 10x the median of MTA riders and underrepresents women and people of color. (Patch)

The MTA might be out of touch with the average rider, but the problem with the MTA isn’t the board. The man who won’t stop saying he’s not in charge of the MTA but keeps meddling in the MTA’s plans is the focus of a 170-page report from Reinvent Albany calls for 50 proposals for a more accountable and transparent transit authority. Page one? “The governor controls the MTA.” Now trying getting Governor Cuomo to admit it. (amNY)

The city’s animal intake centers take any kinds of animals, even this wallaby. How did a wallaby get into the city to begin with? (r/NYC)

The East Village’s best-kept secret was kept a secret until it closed. The Bijou was an underground movie theater and cruising spot and was also a throwback to Manhattan’s bad old days. The speakeasy has a history that goes back over 60 years that includes a music venue, a mafia-run club, and finally The Bijou. (Bedford + Bowery)

Here’s a look at the 2019-2020 NYC school year. (Patch)

Wegmans has an opening date: October 27. (Eater)

Sesame Street has a permanent location in Manhattan. 63rd St between Central Park West and Broadway. (Mashable)

For $2.65 million, you can be the person who kicked Lena Dunham out of Brooklyn. (6sqft)

There are still four remnants of the original 1904 Times Square subway station that exist today. (Untapped Cities)

The site where the New York Wheel, the massive Ferris wheel on Staten Island, still sits dormant and the city has no plans for the site six months after the project officially died. (6sqft)

A group of billionaires are trying to keep the SHSAT in place by financially backing the South Brooklyn Coalition for Quality Education. The purpose of removing the test from the specialized high school admissions process is to desegregate NYC’s school and bring more racial diversity to elite high schools (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

There’s a pop-up cat cafe this weekend in the East Village, so if you’re looking to adopt a new fuzzy friend, this is your opportunity. (Bedford + Bowery)

20 outdoor art installations not to miss this month. (Untapped Cities)

NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo, whose chokehold led to the death of Eric Garner, is fighting to delay his hearing with the Civilian Complaint Review Board. (Gothamist)

Gothamist declared Wayla is the city’s best new restaurant, citing the food, green patio, and decor as standouts. (Gothamist)

A membership to The Sentry’s rooftop pool might be more than your portion of the rent, but that won’t stop you from ogling the photos of it. (Time Out)

A real estate developer is trying to bargain for more square footage by offering to build an accessible subway station for $11 million in Gowanus. (Brooklyn Paper)

The father of Aurilla Lawrence, who died after being run over by an oil tanker truck at the end of February, makes a plea to the mayor to take action to stop making excuses and prevent senseless traffic deaths. (Gothamist)

Did you take a photo of a couple who for engaged in Grand Central Terminal on Sunday? They are looking for anyone who took surreptitious photos of the event. (amNY)

The MTA is investigating excessive overtime payments to transit workers, in some cases hundreds of thousands of dollars per person per year. A 16% increase in overtime led to a $418 million payroll increase. (Gothamist)

Lyft’s attempt to fight against a $17.22 after expenses minimum wage for drivers failed. (Gothamist)

Meet the 2019 James Beard Award finalists for best NYC chef. (amNY)

Is the cost of living higher in New York or Los Angeles? Come on, you know the answer to that. (StreetEasy)

The state seemed to have momentum on its side when pushing a bill that would end religious exemptions for vaccines, but the bill seems to be dead in the water. Why? (NY Times)

Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer stopped by the Max & Murphy podcast for a 30-minute conversation about her lawsuit against the city centering around housing developments on NYCHA land, NIMBYism, dealing with the mayor, what she’ll do after she hets her term limit, and more. (Gotham Gazette)

17 bars with outstanding agave-based tequila drinks. (Eater)

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