The Briefly for May 26, 2020 – The “Summer of Cannibalistic Rats” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: It’s gonna be a hot and wet summer, de Blasio sets the city’s thresholds for reopening, where to get frozen cocktails, Melinda Katz breaks a promise, & more

Today – Low: 60˚ High: 72˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

The city remains on PAUSE, with 4/7 metrics met.

Here’s a beginner’s guide to biking to the beach, for the uninitiated. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

ConEd says the city should expect higher than usual electricity bills this summer in a combination of people being home more often and an increase in supply charges. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Also, this summer is predicted to unusually hotter and rainier than usual. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Why stop the bad news train now? This year’s hurricane season has been described as “brutal,” with double the number of hurricanes expected with six major storms and 19 named storms expected in total. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The bad news train keeps on rolling. The city’s rats have depended on the trash from restaurants for hundreds of generations, with restaurants either closed or producing much less food waste, rats are getting desperate and aggressive. They don’t pose a threat to humans but are turning on each other, turning to cannibalization. (Mariel Padilla for NY Times)

The city will be contacting you if you’ve had exposure using the same technology that Uber uses to text you that your driver is arriving. (Rachel Kraus for Mashable)

Queens DA Melinda Katz is breaking one of her campaign promises less than a year into office. While campaigning, Katz claimed she supported the legalization of sex work, but according to DecrimNY she has been targeting the buyers of sex work as part of her new Human Trafficking Bureau. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Errick Allen, an NYPD officer, was arrested on murder charges for fatally shooting his childhood friend in the head on Long Island. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re looking for a new apartment and pizza is your #1 priority, here are listings available near some of the city’s best pizzerias. (Localize.City)

As part of a new four-part plan to support nursing homes during the pandemic, the city will offer on-site COVID-19 testing to patients and staff at all 169 nursing homes across the city. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Every public school student in New York City will soon receive $420 to help pay for food while school buildings are shut down, regardless of family income. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

The NYPD’s enforcement of social distancing measures continues to hit black and brown New Yorkers hardest, according to new data gleaned by the Legal Aid Society. (Mark Hallum for Brooklyn Paper)

The city has opened up 45 miles of open streets in May, surprisingly exceeding its own goal for the month. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio set new thresholds for the city to begin reopening, separate from the state’s thresholds. Fewer than 200 daily hospitalizations, fewer than 375 patients in the ICU, and a positive testing rate below 15%, all for at least 10 to 14 days. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

It’s not the mayor’s decision on when the city reopens, as Governor Cuomo said in a press conference on Friday “it’s a statewide decision across the board.” The city’s guidelines, if met before the state’s, only serve to confuse. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

More than 100,000 small businesses have shut down permanently since the start of the pandemic, so the state is putting forward over $100 million towards a loan program for small businesses to help them amid the pandemic. Pre-applications start today. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Anybody who believes they have symptoms or who has been in contact with somebody who has tested positive is now urged to be tested for Covid-19. Here’s how to get tested. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

At this point it seems like people are expecting Councilmember Brad Lander and Mayor de Blasio to botch the Gowanus rezoning. With both leaving power in 2021, will they rush a poorly-thought plan through or will both of their legacies be an empty promise for the neighborhood? (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

New York will pay death benefits for essential government workers who lost their lives to novel coronavirus. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What is the “new normal?” No one knows yet, but it could look something like the wall of vending machines full of N95 masks on Delancey Street. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Swimming at the city’s beaches remains banned, but the City Council is working on guidelines to help open the city’s waters to swimmers. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Video: A walk through an empty Grand Central Terminal. (ActionKid)

The woman who started the #ClapForOurCarers at 7 pm says it’s time to stop. Annemarie Plas says that people have shown their appreciation and its time for people in power to reward them and give them the respect they deserve. Plas started the clapping in the UK, we’ll see if her calls for it to stop are heard across the Atlantic. (Derrick Bryson Taylor for NY Times)

Daci Zudi was riding his bike when he was hit and killed by Faustino Rebollar Garcia, driving his pickup truck. For the death of Zudi, Garcia was charged with failure to exercise due care and driving without a license, both minor charges. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

If you’ve got a soft spot for doughnuts, three Doughnut Plan locations have reopened. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The governor allowed religious gatherings of 10 or fewer people at the end of last week and was sued by the New York Civil Liberties Union, forcing the governor to change his executive order to allow non-essential gatherings of ten or fewer people across the state. The NYCLU seems to be pushing that responsibly distanced protests should be allowed, but it’s difficult to not see this being bused in other ways. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Where to get frozen cocktails. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The amazing story of Alice, the elephant who escaped from Coney Island and swam the five miles to Staten Island. She retired to the Bronx Zoo, which is a whole other story. (Thomas Hynes for Untapped New York)

20 Michelin-starred restaurants still open. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Thank you to reader Ariana for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for April 14, 2020 – The “Fell Between Train Cars and Survived” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: How a tiger got a COVID-19 test, the best cheese delivery, a plan to get the economy moving, sex work in the time of social distancing, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 56˚
Possible drizzle overnight.

Emergency food providers in New York City will receive $25 million in emergency funding to help them deal with the many challenges of the coronavirus pandemic and continue providing food to those in need, paying for 19 million meals. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

An interview with NYC Food Czar Kathryn Garcia is scouring the city for essential food workers, getting meals to the most vulnerable, and keeping the supply chains visible. (Lela Nargi for Civil Eats)

Photos: 13 amazing looks from this year’s online Easter Bonnet Parade. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

It’s a literal miracle. A blind man fell between two F train cars on Easter and survived. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

One of my favorite video tours of NYC: Richard Splett (Veep), NYC savvy insider, shows the best the city has to offer. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A peek into the world of sex work in the city while social distancing. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

Everyone’s adjusting, coffee shops included. Here are the city’s top coffee shops that pivoted to delivering fresh-roasted beans. (Liz Clayton for Eater)

Take a look at the city’s shuttered hospitals over the last 20 years and you’ll find that half of them have been replaced by residential buildings. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Dive into Bill Cuningham’s photo archive to create a new Easter Parade picked from history. (Vanessa Friedman for NY Times)

If you’re uninsured and want to enroll in healthcare through the state, the deadline was extended until May 15. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Happy Birthday? Here’s where to get takeout and delivery for your birthday. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

So, why was a tiger able to get a COVID-19 test? (Alyse Stanley for Gizmodo)

Videos: NYC’s empty streets. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Lost in the Cuomo vs de Blasio fight over keeping the schools closed through the end of the school year is de Blasio saying that there’s no guarantee that schools will be open even in September. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Is this your asshole cat in the East Village? (EV Grieve)

The best cheese delivery in NYC. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

We’re ordering less delivery than before the pandemic hit, according to Grub Hub. Maybe everyone realized they can use Grub Hub for a menu and are calling restaurants directly? Probably not. (Serena Dai for Eater)

New hospitalizations for COVID-19 fell by 17 percent — with 383 people admitted to hospitals on Saturday, down from 463 on Friday. Finally, a good sign. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Governor Cuomo is working with five neighboring states to chart a path to get the economy moving again. The six states, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island are working together to unite as states of America, which is an interesting concept. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

A Broadway fund-raiser to benefit entertainment workers whose livelihoods have been imperiled by the coronavirus will be rescheduled after a labor union retreated from a demand that musicians be paid for the streaming of the previously recorded event. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The city’s daily release of COVID-19 information has improved in quality, but still does not account for suspected cases of COVID-19-related deaths in the home. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Inside Enoteca Maria, where the kitchen crew is all grandmas. (Reina Gattuso for Atlas Obscura)

The combination of a rainbow and the 7pm cheer is pretty hard to beat. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

The NYC Italian delivery guide. Unfortunately, there are as many places in Queens on this map as there are in New Jersey, so this is mostly Manhattan and South Brooklyn. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for March 5, 2020 – The “Are We Supposed to Be Freaking Out Yet?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Two colleges close due to COVID-19 fears, the loudest borough in the city, 60,000 children owe late library fees, 30 excellent weekday breakfasts, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 52˚
Clear throughout the day.

30 excellent spots for weekday breakfast. (Nikko Duren & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Could New York be the first state to decriminalize sex work? There’s a bill working its way through the state’s legislature that could make it happen. (Arima Long for Kings County Politics)

How many people get a sandwich named after them and how many of those people get to eat that sandwich? Experiencing the Wayne Diamond at Russo’s Mozzarella and Pasta with Wayne Diamond himself. (EV Grieve)

A New York City public school teacher who vacationed in Italy during the February winter break is set to undergo testing after experiencing possible coronavirus symptoms after spending several days last week in a classroom with children before she showed any signs of potential infection. Remain calm. (Greg B. Smith and Yoav Gonen for The City)

The person with the third confirmed coronavirus case in New York state is a student at Yeshiva University, which closed its campus temporarily in upper Manhattan. (Jen Chung and Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

How are restaurants preparing for coronavirus? Following the city’s sanitary guidelines have become more important than ever. (Hannah Howard for Grub Street)

All your coronavirus questions answered. Okay, maybe not ALL of them, but it’s a pretty comprehensive list of questions. If you’re the person people turn to with questions about it, this is a good link to send the people asking you questions. (Jen Chung and Elizabeth King for Gothamist)

New York Law School closed its Tribeca campus after a student reported contact with the New Rochelle lawyer seriously ill with novel coronavirus. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Here is how the city is stepping up its coronavirus prevention efforts. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

A brief note from City Council Speaker Corey Johnson about coronavirus. (Corey Johnson for The Brooklyn Reader)

Historic restaurant Gage & Tollner is ready to return to the city on March 15th. (Robert Simonson for NY Times)

No matter the changes, New York real estate can still be a mostly lawless place where brokers are willing to charge whatever they want for whatever they want before you get your keys. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

9 buildings in the city that have lost their landmark status. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

At the moment it’s a parking lot sitting atop the toxic leftovers of a 19th-century thermometer factory near the South Street Seaport, but it soon may be a 990-foot tall mixed use tower. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The “Ladies Burger” at Long Island Bar in Cobble Hill, a single patty option of its Long Island Burger, is dead. The name is gone, but the single patty option lives on. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

14 ways to celebrate Women’s History Month in NYC. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Andy Kessler was an early pioneer of skateboarding in Riverside Park and on the Upper West Side, and Community Board 7 will name the Riverside Skate Park in his honor when it reopens in May. (amNewYork Metro)

Buckle up, no matter where you’re sitting. A new bill is headed to Governor Cuomo’s desk that would make it mandatory for seatbelts to be worn in every seat of the car. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The story of how a living room turned into Lion’s Roar Karaoke House in East Williamsburg. (Lauren Vespoli for NY Times)

The Double Chocolate Cookie with Oat Ganache, “the greatest cookie” (Gothamist’s words, not mine), will be available in the city this month only. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

60,000 delinquent children have $15 or more of late fees at New York’s public libraries, preventing them from borrowing more books. The head librarians of New York, Queens, and Brooklyn public libraries asked the City Council to wipe out late fees for children altogether to get books back in the hands of children. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A guide to prewar vs post-war apartments. (Localize Labs)

Congrats Brooklyn, you’re the noisiest borough in the city. (Beth Dedman for amNewYork Metro)

16 exemplary Chinese soup dumplings in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thank you to reader Emily for sending in today’s featured photo!