The Briefly for August 14, 2019 – The “Hangry Squirrels Want Your Blood” Edition

Corey Johnson’s Rat Academy, the city and state challenge the “public charge” rule, Inwood fights rezoning, the best pastrami and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Are you ready for Rat Academy? City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is hosting an event with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on August 22 for free training on safe and effective methods for rat prevention. (Facebook)

In the first year of the city’s Culture Pass program, 70,000 tickets to 50 cultural institutions across the city like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Second Stage, and others were given out. Anyone with a library card is eligible for CulturePass. (amNY)

Google Maps will now show the location of Lime bikes in the city. (Curbed)

The squirrels in Battery Park are out for blood. Don’t let them woo you into a false sense of security with their fluffy tails and seeming meekness. According to a new warning from city officials, they’re vicious little hellbeasts who will go for your food at any cost. (Gothamist)

The city’s subway stations are in pretty poor shape, but they’re the worst in Queens, where 44% of the structural components are in disrepair. The good news in this is that the overall number od station with serious structural deficiencies actually fell from 2012 to 2017. (LIC Post)

The governor signed a new law into place strengthening the state’s sexual harassment protections. (Gothamist)

David Chang continues his “I built my businesses on the foundation of Stephen Ross’s money” apology tour, donating all of the profits his restaurants to different progressive organizations. (Eater)

An oral (and visual!) history of Winston the Wonder Dog that jumped off a roof, fell through a sunroof and seems to be doing okay. (Gothamist)

Broadway producer Ben Sprecher was arrested on Tuesday morning on child pornography charges. (Gothamist)

What does “parents buying” mean on a real estate listing? Pretty much what you might imagine it would. (StreetEasy)

An NYPD officer committed suicide on Tuesday morning, the eighth of the year. An average year sees five officers commit suicide. (NY Times)

The Off-Broadway “How I Learned to Drive” won a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1998 and 23 years later the show will reunite on Broadway in 2020 with David Morse and Mary-Louise Parker reprising their original roles. (NY Times)

Snapple is spending the summer paying tribute to “Boroughs & Burbs,” and the label designs are about as embarrassing as a drink designed by Bret Michaels. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The warden at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan has been temporarily reassigned after the suicide of Jeffrey Epstein and the two guards guarding him have been put on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation into his death. (NY Times)

The Metropolitan Correctional Center historically has had issues with overcrowding, understaffing, cleanliness, and medical care. This is the same facility that experienced a multi-day heat and electricity outage during the coldest days of last winter. (Gothamist)

The new transit fare OMNY system hit its millionth fare on August 8, four times faster than planned. The MTA has no plans to roll out the system ahead of schedule and will be in all stations and buses by the end of 2020. (amNY)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for some big outages over the next two weekends as the MTA is wrapping up a rehab project. Service will be shut down between Harlem and Downtown Brooklyn. (amNY)

Today is the first day of the special “look-back” period for sexual abuse lawsuits in the state and thousands of cases are expected to be filed. The suits are being triggered by the Child Victims Act, which increased the statute of limitation for child sexual abuse from age 23 to age 55 and included this one-year “look-back” period. (amNY)

This weekend Apartment 5A: A Tribute to the Show About Nothing takes over Parasol Projects on the Bowery. It’s an exhibition dedicated to all things Seinfeld in celebration of the show’s 30th anniversary. (Gothamist)

Meet Jamaal Bowman, Cornerstone Academy for Social Action’s principal, who is challenging Congressperson Eliot Engel for the 16th Congressional District seat in the House of Representatives. Bowman has the backing of Justice Democrats, the group who pushed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez into office. (Gothamist)

The city and state are once again planning to take the federal government to court. This time it’s over the final “public charge” rule, which would require immigrants seeking green cards or visas to show they are not likely to rely on certain government programs like food stamps. Without challenge, the rule would go into effect in October. (Patch)

There is only one legal hostel in New York City thanks to the city’s building codes. Council members Mark Gjonaj and Margaret Chin are looking to change that with a new bill that will give hostels their own classification and a regulatory agency to look over them. (Gothamist)

Video: What’s the best pastrami sandwich in the city? (Viewing NYC)

Five finalists in the Big Ideas for Small Lots architecture competition are being displayed at the Center for Architecture. The competition highlights the challenges facing a number of the city’s 10,000 small and/or oddly-shaped lots and faces those challenges with unconventional developments. (Curbed)

A look back at the efforts of Jackie O and preservationists to save Grand Central Terminal from the same fate as the original Penn Station. (6sqft)

Opening arguments were heard on Tuesday in a lawsuit meant to prevent the rezoning of Inwood. The lawsuit accuses the city of failing to look at the environmental impact of the rezoning, particularly among racial lines. The rezoning was approved after three years of community protest that the rezoning continues Mayor de Blasio’s selling out the city to developers. (Gothamist)

A 3.2-acre farm is opening in Brooklyn on the rooftop of the Liberty View Industrial Plaza mall in Sunset Par and operated by Brooklyn Grange. Once the space officially opens, it will be open to the public on Sundays through October. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The opening of a sanitation garage may not seem like a big deal, but it is when a neighborhood’s been waiting for it since 1985. Having a local garage means trash pickup times can change from evenings to mornings, which means a change in how the neighborhood looks and smells. (Kings County Politics)

The classic steakhouses of New York City. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 21, 2019 – The “Notorious B.I.G.’s ‘One Room Shack’ is Available For $4,000” Edition

Pot possession decriminalized under two ounces, jumbo shrimp in a dive bar, the most exclusive NYC beach, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

One week before WorldPride denies any big weekend subway changes, this weekend’s travel options are looking rough. (Subway Weekender)

We’re getting a much-deserved break from the gloom of this week with a pair of sunny days with consistently pleasant temperatures this weekend. (amNY)

The legislature couldn’t find a way to legalize the recreational use of marijuana, but they did manage to decriminalize the possession of fewer than two ounces and will expunge the record of low-level pot-related convictions. Instead of a crime, it’ll be treated as a violation with fines as low as $50. (NY Times)

The city sued 13 firms and four people who ran a ring of illegal Airbnbs that duped nearly 60,000 visitors into conditions the city is calling unsanitary and dangerous, including a three family house in Queens that was subdivided into 12 different hotel rooms with 24 beds. (Curbed)

The Notorious B.I.G.’s 972-square-foot “one-room shack” in Clinton Hill, mentioned in his song “Juicy,” at 226 St. James Place is available for rent for $4,000. (6sqft)

If you’ve been dying to live in Trump Tower, you can buy Paul Manafort’s old apartment from the US Marshals Service for a cool $3.6 million. (Curbed)

A Hunter College study found that a quarter of the city’s cyclists don’t stop at red lights, with professional cyclists were more likely to run lights and the study happened between April 8 and May 1. (Patch)

A look at the state’s ambitious climate goals, which would practically remove all carbon-emissions-based energy by 2050. Cars are mostly exempt from the plans. (NY Times)

Today (Friday) is the longest day of the year, which means Make Music New York, with one thousand free concerts across the city. (Brooklyn Based)

The city’s most exclusive beach is a small, hidden beach on the Manhattan side of the Brooklyn Bridge and will only be open for one day this year in celebration of City of Water Day. (Untapped Cities)

The city will be dragged away from its reliance on cars kicking and screaming if it has to. The Bay Ridge Community Board voted down the Department of Transportation’s bike lanes and the next day the neighborhood’s City Councilmember and State Assemblymembers wrote the DOT, urging them to proceed regardless. (Curbed)

Should you order the jumbo coconut shrimp at a dive bar? Gothamist says yes when it’s the 169 Bar. (Gothamist)

If you’re looking for an apartment for you and your fuzzy friends, here are the Manhattan neighborhoods with the highest proportion of pet-friendly apartments. (Patch)

The state’s legislature passed a package of bills that are targeted as sexual harassment that will make New York’s laws the toughest in the nation. The bills restrict employers’ ability to avoid liability for the behavior of their employees, provide attorney fees and damages in discrimination cases, expand the complaint windows, and ensure training is provided in multiple languages. (NY Times)

Seven new Italian restaurants that demand your attention. (Grub Street)

Stories to keep an eye on: The Paris arthouse movie theater is rumored to be closing before the end of this summer. The NYPD and Department of Education have a memorandum of understanding that will limit the arrests for low-level crimes in city schools.

Video: Sleepless in New York is a mesmerizing series of time-lapse videos looking at Manhattan from multiple angles. (Viewing NYC)

An explanation of how the rent reform package in Albany helps all renters. (NY Times)

Eater thinks it’s found the city’s best bagels. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for February 28, 2019 – The “Bodega Ham, Now With Extra Plastic” Edition

Subway and bus fare is going up, the mayor punts on controlling the MTA, NYC’s James Beard Award semifinalists, NYCHA promises to find lead, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Bus and subway fares are going up on April 21. Single rides are staying put at $2.75 but weekly cards will go from $32 to $33, monthly cards will go from $121 to $127, and the bonus for putting more than $5.50 on your MetroCard is disappearing. (amNY)

You may want to avoid bodega ham for a little while. (Gothamist)

A new bill will clarify the definition of sexual harassment and strengthen the laws against it. Harassment must be “severe or pervasive” to be considered illegal at the moment. (QNS)

The barnacle Citi Bike was cute once, but stop throwing Citi Bikes into the rivers. (West Side Rag)

Ever since dropping the “Trump Soho” branding, the Dominick Hotel has seen a 20% increase in revenue. (The Real Deal)

Do not disturb? Hardly. The city’s worst hotels when it comes to noise complaints. (Localize Labs)

Daiso, the Japanese dollar store, is opening its first East coast store in the Flushing mall on March 8. (Eater)

The 18 best restaurants on the Upper West Side. (Grub Street)

Today is the last day for Raul Candy Store in Alphabet City after over 40 years. As a way to say goodbye, all the remaining candy in the store is free. (NY Post)

Even Mayor de Blasio’s wife isn’t sure he should run for president. (Patch)

The rights of students with disabilities haven’t been upheld in Success Academy, the city’s largest charter school network. (Patch)

Here’s the latest on the EPA’s Superfund cleanup of the Gowanus Canal. (Bklyner)

If you’re on Park Avenue and wondering what those giant stretched yellow rubber things are, it’s “Tension Sculptures” by Brooklyn-based artist Joseph La Piana. (NY Times)

The mayor punted on the idea of the city being in control of the MTA, handing responsibility to the governor’s office. (Streetsblog)

Horticulture at Green-Wood Cemetery is deadly serious business. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s what you should now about Jumaane Williams, the city’s new Public Advocate. (amNY)

Where are we with legalizing marijuana? The state budget deadline of April 1 is fast approaching. (amNY)

A guide to the subway’s signal system. (Curbed)

An oral history of the Sidewalk Cafe, the home of antifolk. (Gothamist)

Micaela Diamond is 19 and has become Cher 100 times. (amNY)

NYCHA promises 100 percent confidence in finding lead in its developments. Right. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez is set to announce his support in giving undocumented immigrants driver’s licenses. (NY Post)

Can you help catch whoever stole Luna, the beloved two-month old bodega cat from Ismael’s Gourmet Deli in the Bronx? (News 12)

NYCs 2019 James Beard Awards semifinalists. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.