The Briefly for September 27-28, 2020 – The “Indoor Dining Returns, Outdoor Dining Becomes Permanent” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: 600k kids return to school this week, the mayor announces future announcements, the best new burgers in the city

Today – Low: 68˚ High: 76˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Video: In case you were wondering, the NYPD’s tactics have not changed in the face of months straight of protests throughout the city. This was the scene last night in the West Village as the NYPD swarmed protesters on 6th St after the “Celebration of Art Of Protest” in Washington Square Park (FreedomNewsTV)

The NYPD ended its training program for officers to de-escalate encounters with people in a mental health crisis. The future of the program is in limbo. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Indoor dining returns this Wednesday in NYC. Here’s how restaurants are preparing. Keep in mind, not every restaurant will be taking part. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

Outdoor dining is now permanent. Here’s everything to know about the city’s permanent outdoor dining plan. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Coronavirus anxiety and depression have hit NYC, as a new study says 44% of New Yorkers are feeling anxiety about the virus and 36% felt depressed since the start of our PAUSE. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

How will the city’s souvenir shops survive the pandemic without tourists? Maybe they won’t. (Carson Kessler for The City)

Good news for you if you’re someone who has been collecting your compost since the city’s collections stopped in March. Compost drop-off locations return to six Greenmarkets. (Tequila Minsky for The Villager)

The American Museum of Natural History fired Mark E. Siddall after the museum found that he had sexually harassed and bullied a graduate student who was doing research under his supervision. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Tourist helicopters are back to annoy city dwellers and, in a surprising twist, they’re coming from Jersey. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Next year’s city-wide elections will be ranked-choice. I’ve linked to this explainer video multiple times already, so when city officials and candidates argue that we’re not ready for a new voting system, you can tell them to go to hell. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Home sales are surging on Brooklyn. Tell that to the next person who bemoans how many people are leaving the city for the suburbs. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

Dianne Smith has a new installation titled “Styling: Black Expression, Rebellion and Joy Through Fashion” that pays tribute to Black women who shape and redefine what it means to be stylish. The location? Nordstrom at Columbus Circle. This is the first full-scale art exhibition at the location. (Roger Clark for NY1)

The MTA is set to run out of money before 2021 and will likely be forced to borrow money to survive. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

When someone vandalized the A train tracks last week, Rikien Wilder was there to clear some of the items thrown on the tracks and tackle the vandal as they tried to get away. The MTA showed their appreciation for Wilder’s heroics with a free year of subway rides. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Here’s someone trying to find the silver lining in the clouds of Century 21’s closing in Bay Ridge. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

It’s a renters market, the Times gives some advice about how to negotiate with your landlord. (Ronda Kaysen for NY Times)

On August 23, 1974, John Lennon claims he saw a UFO outside Midtown East apartment. (Dave Lifton for Ultimate Classic Rock)

The apartment that John Lennon was living in, and saw the UFO from, is now for sale for $5.5 million. It’s a 4,000 triplex and it’s also where the iconic John Lennon “New York City” photo was taken. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Maybe you’ll see your own UFOs after purchasing the apartment because UFO sightings are up in New York. At 184 sightings, we’ve already exceeded the 151 sightings total for 2019. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The asshole of the week is Heshy Tischler, who crashed a press conference about the uptick in Covid-19 cases in the Ocean Parkway Cluster without a mask and denying the existence of the virus, causing the press conference to be cut short. (Aidan Graham and Meaghan McGoldrick for amNewYork Metro)

“There’s rampant COVID denialism and misinformation abound in the community. People are not getting tested and are refusing care even when sick. This is deeply distressing.” Three men from Orthodox communities died from Covid-19 last week at Maimonides Hospital. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Bill de Blasio held a press conference announcing that he will hold future press conferences about the city’s “rebirth.” I’d argue the city’s rebirth starts on election day 2021 when we pick a new mayor. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor bowed to pressure from Upper West Siders to remove 300 homeless men from a temporary shelter. Then he took that decision back. Then he took that decision back and removing the 300 homeless New Yorkers from their temporary shelter and move them to another shelter in the Financial District in a move being called “the pinnacle of cowardliness.” Most politicians reveal their true selves once they are no longer up for re-election. I guess the mayor is showing us all who he really is. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The mayor’s pledge to close Rikers Island is falling apart. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Thanks to a federal judge’s ruling, you have until October 31 to fill out your census information. The Trump administration had tried to shorten the deadline to September 30 and the city is woefully behind on people filling it out. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

John Burns, a longtime friend of the mayor and first deputy commissioner at the Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings, resigned under fire after an investigation found he mistreated a female employee and created a hostile workplace. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Photos: A first look at Eataly’s honey-themed rooftop restaurant. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

It’s a fantastical idea: The Mandragore would use half of Roosevelt Island to build the country’s tallest building and the world’s tallest “carbon sink” that would actually reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the city and generate energy with wind turbines and solar panels. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Miles Morales: Spider-Man, coming for the PlayStation 4 and 5, uses Harlem as its setting, a rare location for a digital depiction of New York City. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

The six best new burgers in the city. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Photos: Check out the new bike-based cargo delivery vehicles you’ll be seeing around the city soon. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

What’s your subway station number? An interactive subway map that gives you a ranking as a New Yorker based on every subway station you’ve ever been to. (My score was 152, giving me the title of “NYC Lifer”) (The Cleverest)

10 great places to see on a Brooklyn Greenway bike ride. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Photos: Inside the secret train track hidden in the depths of Grand Central Terminal. (Emily Nonko for 6sqft)

Restoration work on the Empire State Building’s Art Deco spire is complete, giving the building’s “hat” its original silhouette. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The mayor announced 9,000 furloughs of managers and city employees not under union contracts. The unlucky 9,000 will be laid off for five cays between October and March. The mayor’s looking to save a billion dollars to prevent 22,000 layoffs and these furloughs will save $21 million. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Among these 9,000? The Department of Education announced furloughs for superintendents and other non-union management will be furloughed. Perfect timing as schools are reopening. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

70 staff members as IS 51 in Staten Island are in quarantine after a teacher tested positive for Covid-19. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

In a reversal of education department policy, city teachers will now be allowed to work remotely if they are teaching students who are learning from home, according to a new agreement reached Friday between the city and the teachers union. Seems weird they’d be forced to come to a school building to teach remote students, right? (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

Here’s what you need to know about K-8 students returning to schools this week. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The secret patios of NYC, where you can eat and drink away from the street. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo from The Edge!

The Briefly for October 9, 2019 – The “I Hope Someone Burns It Down” Edition

Alec Baldwin was scammed and the mayor is taking action, $10 million of speeding tickets in Queens, Brooklyn’s best fried chicken sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The pre-Yom Kippur Jewish tradition of “transferring” your sins to a live chicken by swinging it over your head is called kaporos. It’s a barbaric and disgusting tradition that kills thousands of chickens in the streets of Crown Heights. You’ll find people saying if you oppose the tradition you’re anti-Semitic or you’re doing the same thing to the Jewish community that Russia or Germany did by callnig for an end to the tradition. Public streets are not the place for slaughtering animals in 2019. (Gothamist)

The 2019 Miss Subways has been crowned. Congratulations are in order to Ms. Dylan Greenberg, this year’s Miss Subways. (NY Times)

One of this year’s election questions is about ranked-choice voting, here’s an explainer on what it is and a little bit on why it’s a good thing. (amNY)

A community hearing about a homeless shelter in Glendale, Queens started with a moment of silence for the homeless men murdered in Chinatown and then quickly devolved into comments like “I hope someone burns it down,” and “They should be locked away forever.” (Gothamist)

Today’s the day for all working New Yorkers have to have completed sexual harassment training at work. The law was passing in April and gave all New York state employers about six months to have it done. The state senate hasn’t had their training yet. (Politico)

The city revitalized 54-acres of wetlands on Staten Island, with the goal for the first phase being 69 acres. Nice. (Curbed)

Video: A look at the history of tattoos in NYC, which were illegal for nearly 40 years. (Viewing NYC)

The most expensive apartment in the Bronx is on sale for $4.6 Million. (Welcome2TheBronx)

NYC has seen its first vaping death. (Patch)

It’s not only mind-boggling that there are 32 pairs of bus stops less than 260 feet away from each other, but it slows down the routes to have stops that close. (6sqft)

Drivers in Queens racked up over $10 million in speed camera violations in six weeks of the program giving $50 tickets for going more than 10 miles an hour over the speed limit in a school zone. Queens accounts for more than 1/3 of the $28 million total. (LIC Post)

Skunks are common in the city, but for the first time, one has been spotted in Prospect Park. They’re harmless as long as you don’t threaten them, so welcome to our new fuzzy and sometimes stinky park-dwellers. (Patch)

Take a ride in the new Cash Cab. (amNY)

The company operating floating billboards has finally left the city, after the city and state both passed laws making their type of floating billboards illegal. (Patch)

In the dumbest series of events that lead to something good, Alec Baldwin was scammed by the guys selling tickets to boat tours of the Statue of Liberty around Battery Park and Tuesday the mayor said the city will crack down on this type of ticketing scam. If you want to go to the statue, tickets are sold in front of Castle Clinton and on the Statue Cruises website. (NY Times)

What kind of punishment would you assume killing a 10-year-old with a car while driving without a license carries? If you said “a misdemeanor with a maximum punishment of 30 days in jail,” you’re right. (Streetsblog)

Netflix is turning Broadway’s Belasco Theatre into a movie theater to show Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman for the month of November. (Time Out)

A review of Mario Batali’s biggest NYC restaurants in a post-Batali world. (Eater)

The 10 best fried chicken sandwiches in Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Briefly for August 14, 2019 – The “Hangry Squirrels Want Your Blood” Edition

Corey Johnson’s Rat Academy, the city and state challenge the “public charge” rule, Inwood fights rezoning, the best pastrami and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Are you ready for Rat Academy? City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is hosting an event with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on August 22 for free training on safe and effective methods for rat prevention. (Facebook)

In the first year of the city’s Culture Pass program, 70,000 tickets to 50 cultural institutions across the city like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Second Stage, and others were given out. Anyone with a library card is eligible for CulturePass. (amNY)

Google Maps will now show the location of Lime bikes in the city. (Curbed)

The squirrels in Battery Park are out for blood. Don’t let them woo you into a false sense of security with their fluffy tails and seeming meekness. According to a new warning from city officials, they’re vicious little hellbeasts who will go for your food at any cost. (Gothamist)

The city’s subway stations are in pretty poor shape, but they’re the worst in Queens, where 44% of the structural components are in disrepair. The good news in this is that the overall number od station with serious structural deficiencies actually fell from 2012 to 2017. (LIC Post)

The governor signed a new law into place strengthening the state’s sexual harassment protections. (Gothamist)

David Chang continues his “I built my businesses on the foundation of Stephen Ross’s money” apology tour, donating all of the profits his restaurants to different progressive organizations. (Eater)

An oral (and visual!) history of Winston the Wonder Dog that jumped off a roof, fell through a sunroof and seems to be doing okay. (Gothamist)

Broadway producer Ben Sprecher was arrested on Tuesday morning on child pornography charges. (Gothamist)

What does “parents buying” mean on a real estate listing? Pretty much what you might imagine it would. (StreetEasy)

An NYPD officer committed suicide on Tuesday morning, the eighth of the year. An average year sees five officers commit suicide. (NY Times)

The Off-Broadway “How I Learned to Drive” won a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1998 and 23 years later the show will reunite on Broadway in 2020 with David Morse and Mary-Louise Parker reprising their original roles. (NY Times)

Snapple is spending the summer paying tribute to “Boroughs & Burbs,” and the label designs are about as embarrassing as a drink designed by Bret Michaels. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The warden at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan has been temporarily reassigned after the suicide of Jeffrey Epstein and the two guards guarding him have been put on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation into his death. (NY Times)

The Metropolitan Correctional Center historically has had issues with overcrowding, understaffing, cleanliness, and medical care. This is the same facility that experienced a multi-day heat and electricity outage during the coldest days of last winter. (Gothamist)

The new transit fare OMNY system hit its millionth fare on August 8, four times faster than planned. The MTA has no plans to roll out the system ahead of schedule and will be in all stations and buses by the end of 2020. (amNY)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for some big outages over the next two weekends as the MTA is wrapping up a rehab project. Service will be shut down between Harlem and Downtown Brooklyn. (amNY)

Today is the first day of the special “look-back” period for sexual abuse lawsuits in the state and thousands of cases are expected to be filed. The suits are being triggered by the Child Victims Act, which increased the statute of limitation for child sexual abuse from age 23 to age 55 and included this one-year “look-back” period. (amNY)

This weekend Apartment 5A: A Tribute to the Show About Nothing takes over Parasol Projects on the Bowery. It’s an exhibition dedicated to all things Seinfeld in celebration of the show’s 30th anniversary. (Gothamist)

Meet Jamaal Bowman, Cornerstone Academy for Social Action’s principal, who is challenging Congressperson Eliot Engel for the 16th Congressional District seat in the House of Representatives. Bowman has the backing of Justice Democrats, the group who pushed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez into office. (Gothamist)

The city and state are once again planning to take the federal government to court. This time it’s over the final “public charge” rule, which would require immigrants seeking green cards or visas to show they are not likely to rely on certain government programs like food stamps. Without challenge, the rule would go into effect in October. (Patch)

There is only one legal hostel in New York City thanks to the city’s building codes. Council members Mark Gjonaj and Margaret Chin are looking to change that with a new bill that will give hostels their own classification and a regulatory agency to look over them. (Gothamist)

Video: What’s the best pastrami sandwich in the city? (Viewing NYC)

Five finalists in the Big Ideas for Small Lots architecture competition are being displayed at the Center for Architecture. The competition highlights the challenges facing a number of the city’s 10,000 small and/or oddly-shaped lots and faces those challenges with unconventional developments. (Curbed)

A look back at the efforts of Jackie O and preservationists to save Grand Central Terminal from the same fate as the original Penn Station. (6sqft)

Opening arguments were heard on Tuesday in a lawsuit meant to prevent the rezoning of Inwood. The lawsuit accuses the city of failing to look at the environmental impact of the rezoning, particularly among racial lines. The rezoning was approved after three years of community protest that the rezoning continues Mayor de Blasio’s selling out the city to developers. (Gothamist)

A 3.2-acre farm is opening in Brooklyn on the rooftop of the Liberty View Industrial Plaza mall in Sunset Par and operated by Brooklyn Grange. Once the space officially opens, it will be open to the public on Sundays through October. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The opening of a sanitation garage may not seem like a big deal, but it is when a neighborhood’s been waiting for it since 1985. Having a local garage means trash pickup times can change from evenings to mornings, which means a change in how the neighborhood looks and smells. (Kings County Politics)

The classic steakhouses of New York City. (Eater)