The Briefly for June 17, 2020 – The “Don’t Believe What Cops Say” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Playgrounds will open with phase 2, the mayor finally gets a coronavirus test, the AG’s hearing on NYPD interactions during protests, and more

Today – Low: 65˚ High: 74˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

You can watch the Public Hearing Via Video Conference on Police/Public Interactions During Recent Protests at that link at 11am on Wednesday.

Nine protesters detail their violent encounters with the NYPD. (Sydney Pereira, Jake Offenhartz, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Why the hell are NYPD cruisers playing ice cream man music? This isn’t an isolated incident and there is a video. (Luke Fater for Atlas Obscura)

The first wave of lawsuits against the NYPD has begun, with 18 notice of claims being lodged with City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office. (Reuven Blau for The City)

The lesson from yesterday’s story about the NYPD poisoning that never was is clear: Stop believing the police. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

The moment is demanding it, but is the NYPD capable of reform? (Nate File for Bedford + Bowery)

A new policy mandates that body cam footage when the NYPD’s weapons are fired. I hope we’re all ready for a million reasons why cameras “malfunction.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The 1.8 acre 50 Kent pop-up park will open on July 9 on a part-time basis from Thursday to Sunday from 10am to 6pm. (Greenpointers)

Mayor de Blasio announced that playgrounds will reopen in the city’s second phase of reopening. Yeah, it sucks, but we’re all fighting that same anxiousness in service of a greater good. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

It hasn’t been confirmed that we’ll be hitting phase 2 on June 22, and if we don’t, it’s because of assholes like Dani Zoldan on the Upper West Side, who has been running comedy shows inside Stand Up NY, the comedy club he owns. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Oh, look, more assholes. State Senator Simcha Felder, Assemblyman Simcha Eichenstein, and Councilman Kalman Yeger decided their community in Midwood has had enough of being careful and used a grinder to open the chains keeping the Kolbert Playground closed. (Lindsay Tuchman for NY1)

When CMJ announced it was coming back, a virtual festival wasn’t what we pictured. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The stoop is the new bar. And the new restaurant. And everything else too. (Marie Solis for Gothamist)

A look at Dennin Winser’s hand-painted signs, which he’s offering for free for Black-owned businesses. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Sometimes a headline is perfect. A gay socialist could be the first LGBTQ person of color in the New York legislature. Get to know Jabari Brisport. (Molly Sprayregen for LGBTQ Nation)

Ahead of the June 23 primary, Attorney General Letitia James opened a hotline for election issues. If you haven’t applied for an absentee ballot already, you’ll be voting in person. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city is providing free air conditioners for eligible households this summer. There are a few different guidelines to qualify and it’s best to check before it starts getting unreasonably warm. (East New York News)

Someone hung a noose inside Marcus Garvey Park in Harlem. The Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Should you sign a new lease right now? Rents look like they might be on the decline through the end of the year. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Kudos to the MTA for their creative social distancing decals on the subway. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped Cities)

We’ve all seen photos of the Unisphere in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, but have you thought about it represents? It’s meant to be a celebration the start of the Space Age, symbolize the theme of the 1964 World’s Fair “Peace Through Understanding” and also a part of Robert Moses’s plans for New York City. (Lillia Paynch for Untapped New York)

Juneteenth isn’t a recognized holiday in New York, but we could be on the road to changing that. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

Photos: What Michelin-starred restaurant takeout looks like. (Gary He for Eater)

This year’s 4th of July hot dog eating championship will happen without a crowd and will be in a secret location, leaving this the first year in a long time without the competition at the corner of Surf and Stillwell. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The U.S. Open tennis tournament will also be held without a crowd this summer. I hope they fill the stands with stuffed animals and sex dolls like the Korean baseball teams have. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Hospitals and group homes can now accept visitors with their discretion. (Emily Davenport for Gothamist)

Housing courts in the state are starting to reopen, but there’s some confusion over if evictions are allowed to resume. With no additional guidance, Chief Administrative Judge Lawrence Marks’s order from March halting evictions stands, but with pushback from eviction-hungry attorneys and landlords. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

The state and city government is trying to get anyone who thinks they’ve been exposed to Covid-19 to get tested. If that’s the case, why were less than 100 prisoners tested over the first two weeks of June? (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Never trust the first thing Mayor de Blasio says. After taking a sick day on Monday and spreading the message that he didn’t feel there was a need to get tested… he got tested. Everything de Blasio says is a three-day story. Day One: Thing happens. day Two: Mayor says something stupid, ruining credibility. Day Three: Mayor backtracks, becomes joke. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A conversation with Judd Apatow about his new film “The King of Staten Island.” (Molly Given for amNewYork Metro)

The Briefly for June 16, 2020 – The “4th of July Every Single Night” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD disbands a plainclothes unit, Soho’s street art, the mayor’s sick day, Governor Cuomo is ready to shut NYC down again, and more

Today – Low: 61˚ High: 75˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Today’s the last day for you to apply for an absentee ballot.

A voter’s guide to some of the most hotly contested races on the NY ballot. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

What you need to know for the June 23 primary elections. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

What the hell is going on with all the fireworks lately? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Attorney General Letitia James is going to hold an online public hearing on Wednesday to investigate the NYPD’s actions during the protests that followed the murder of George Floyd. (Jacob Kaye for amNewYork Metro)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea has promised “greater transparency,” but it’s hard not to think of that as a joke when he announces that an officer was suspended without pay for spraying mace at a group of people during a protest in Manhattan on June 1. Which officer? No information. Which incident specifically? No information. Very transparent. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The NYPD is disbanding a unit of 600 plainclothes cops in precinct-level and Housing Bureau anti-crime teams. The NYPD will still have plainclothes cops in the Surveillance and Narcotics bureaus. Despite the announcement coming with the statement that it has “no reflection” on their work, the disbanded group represented 2% of the NYPD, but 31% of its fatal shootings. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Make NYPD discipline records public you cowards. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

“Systemic racism is something that is learned. It’s learned over generations. We need to look at the narrative as it has been taught and revise it. And I feel that people are now starting to listen because it’s not just a black problem. If one part of your population is not good, it’s going to call to question what is it to be an American citizen? What is that? What is the real perk in that?” An interview with Detective Felicia Richards, president of the NYPD Guardians Association, a fraternal organization for black police officers. (Jami Floyd and Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

The state’s court system will undergo an independent review of its practices regarding institutional racism. The review will be overseen by a former U.S. secretary of Homeland Security and a general counsel for the Obama Administration’s Department of Defense. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Photos: Soho street art. (Josh Vogel for NYC Urbanism)

While the plans for the city’s 2020-2021 school year haven’t been publicly announced (I’ve heard it’s a limit of 10 people per classroom), there’s still a matter of what teachers will be healthy enough to return to the classrooms. According to the Department of Education estimates, up to 20% of teachers could be working remotely due to health concerns. (Reema Amin for ChalkBeat)

Short experiences from across the city from people who discovered their neighbors and neighborhoods during quarantine. (NY Times)

Where was the mayor on Monday? He was sick and at home. In his own words, “All New Yorkers should get a Covid-19 diagnostic test, whether or not they have symptoms or at increased risk.” Did he get a test? Of course now, and he has no plans to get one in the future. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Don’t make Cuomo turn this reopening around. There were over 25,000 reopening violation complaints to the state and it seems that Governor Cuomo is losing patience with Mayor de Blasio’s inability to enforce the rules, stating plainly “enforce the law or there will be state action.” (Erik Enquist for The Real Deal)

Raise your hand if you’re surprised that the MTA’s homeless outreach program was not a success. No one? (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

12 restaurants that are selling frozen Chinese dumplings for home cooking. (Tony Lin for Eater)

Since 2013, there have been more than 25 million applications submitted for roughly 40,000 units in the city’s housing lottery. This week the city rolled out a new system for the lottery. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Airbnb is settling a lawsuit with the city by handing over data about hosts. It won’t be retroactive, but it will start once a new city ordinance is passed. The hope is to weed out illegal short-term rentals. (Christine Fisher for Engadget)

Monday’s LGBTQ SCOTUS decision has its roots in Greenwich Village. (Andrew Berman for GVSHP)

33 places to celebrate Black history in NYC. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Over 10,000 people took to the streets of Brooklyn on Sunday for “Brooklyn Liberation: An Action for Black Trans Lives.” The march came together after Dominique “Rem’mie” Fells and Riah Milton were killed within 24 hours of each other. Justice was also called for in the names of Tony McHale, Layleen Polanco, and Nina Pop. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Paper)

The photos from the Black Liberation rally are truly impressive. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Photos: Coney Island’s George Floyd protest. (Jamie DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The NYPD found no criminality after officers became sick Monday night from shakes they got at a Shake Shack in downtown Manhattan. I think the NYPD should have allowed Shake Shack to do their own investigation. (CBS News)

Tired of your traditional summer reading lists? Here’s a list of Nick Cave’s favorite books. (Erin Christie for BrooklynVegan)

A 14-year-old who pleaded guilty to robbing Tessa Majors in Morningside Park was sentenced in Manhattan Family Court on Monday to 18 months in a juvenile facility. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The NYC sandwich delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for May 20, 2020 – The “What to Do if You Find a Baby Bird” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Long Island beaches shut out city residents, Peter Luger’s opens for delivery, delivery by drag queens, Magnolia and the MTA start using UVC lights, & more

Today – Low: 48˚ High: 63˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

After cancelation, reinstatement, appeal, and a rejection the June 23 presidential primary is officially back. This means an additional 615 in-person poll sites, 22 early voting poll sites, and 4,617 poll workers will be required. This is also a reminder that you can and should vote absentee this year. Here’s how. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The Chrysler Building applied to the Landmarks Preservation Commission to add an observation deck on the 61st floor. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

177,700 students will be attending virtual summer school this year. It’s been a tough year for students, so comparing this year’s numbers to any year in the past is not an apples-to-apples comparison, but this is the highest number of students in history. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

What to do if you find a baby bird. Hint: its parents won’t smell you on them. (Beth Skwarecki for Lifehacker)

“My fingernails are breaking, I’ve got hangnails, I’ve been getting my nails done for 14 years … I’m very much into yoga, I can’t go to my Bikram yoga studios, I can’t go get my eyelashes done, I can’t go and socialize with the people that are my friends. It’s led me to depression, it’s made me not feel sexual — I mean it’s awful.” This is a real quote from someone protesting outside a barbershop in Williamsburg, but the protestors were sparse mostly from out of state. If you’re looking for a barbershop to avoid, it’s the Beard Barberia Cut and Shave on the corner of Grand Street, who organized the protest (which drew six!!! people) with the pro-Trump group Liberate America, whose organizer was arrested in 2017 for allegedly jerking off in the back seat of an Uber in CA. (Kevin Dugan for Brooklyn Paper)

This year’s virtual pride celebration’s grand marshals are the Ali Forney Center, Dan Levy, showrunner and star of “Schitt’s Creek,” Yanzi Peng, executive director of LGBT Rights China, and Victoria Cruz, a queer rights activist. (Paul Schindler for Gay City News)

The mayor announced the city’s heatwave plan, which includes air conditioners for NYCHA and low-income homes, electricity subsidies, misting oases in parks, and open fire hydrants on certain blocks. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Nearly 70% of offices were open concept, what will offices look like when they reopen? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Have you been in a car around the city lately? It’s very weird. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

It’s amazing what a bit of yarn on a fence can do to lift your spirits. A look at the yarn bombing in East Harlem. (Roger Clark for NY1)

Momofuku announced that Ssäm Bar will be moving from the East Village to the Wayō space in Manhattan’s Seaport District. David Chang’s restaurants have chosen increasingly more touristy areas for its restaurants since Trump-supporting billionaire Stephen Ross came on board in 2016. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Peter Luger is offering take-out and delivery for the first time ever. If you’ve been clamoring for food from the restaurants that recently received a zero-star rating from NY Times’s Pete Wells, here’s your chance. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Today (Wednesday) is the Naming The Lost: A 24 Hour COVID Vigil, a 24-hour virtual vigil that starts at 2 pm to provide an opportunity for collective mourning as the number of deaths reaches for 100,000. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Mayor Bill de Blasio will press the state to approve line-of-duty benefits for families of city workers killed by the coronavirus. The mayor wants the benefits to expand beyond first responders, which is the current limit of federal legislation. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

A weekend project: make Shake Shack’s cheese sauce at home. (Claire Lower for Lifehacker)

Nine hospitals in the city are about to begin allowing visitors again in a test program as Covid-19 is showing signs of abatement. There will be restrictions, but to those who have been in the hospital during this pandemic, I’m sure that any friendly face would be a welcome one. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Five of the most cringe-worthy excerpts from President Trump’s talk with NYC restaurant owners. Thomas Keller from Per Se is kissing the president’s ass so hard these moments he should be embarrassed. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Fresco’s Cantina in Astoria is putting a new spin on delivery with its new “DRAG-livery” service, which involves sending drag queens out to deliver food and perform. The service is an additional $15 on top of a food order. (NY1)

A look at David Bowie’s favorite NYC sandwiches. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Magnolia Bakery’s locations on the Upper West Side and in the West Village are experimenting with new ultraviolet lights that supposedly kill airborne virus particles as people enter the bakery. The light will be in addition to every other protective measure that has been put in place. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Magnolia isn’t the only one getting in on UV lights, the MTA announced it is launching a three-week pilot program using UVC lights, which has been used to disinfect buses in Shanghai. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If your plan was to hear out to Long Island this weekend because the city’s beaches will be closed, tough shit because Long Island’s beaches will be off-limits to city residents. (Marcus Navarro for Politico)

Taste Of Persia, the Persian restaurant once inside a pizza place in Flatiron, is reopening as a delivery-only business. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Why hasn’t Dr. Oxiris Barbot been at the forefront of the city’s communication with the public? The root of the problem seems to be the mayor, who has had a tense history with his Health Department. (J. David Goodman and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

Where to find NYC’s best bread delivery right now. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

NYU is planning on allowing students back on campus for the fall semester. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

13% of the city’s nearly 10,000 corrections officers have caught Covid-19. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

Being a fan of the Knicks is fun because every year the Knicks try something new or hire new people and still manage to produce the same garbage results. The Knicks’ latest move is hiring Frank Zanin as an assistant general manager. The Knicks are 67-163 under their current general manager, so Zanin has a tough road ahead of him whenever the NBA starts up again. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Health inspectors are two months into a hiatus on examining local restaurants still open for takeout during the coronavirus pandemic. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Where to get Chinese takeout and delivery. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Emma for today’s featured photo!