The Briefly for November 1, 2018 – The “We Need A New Bushwick We Ruined this One” Edition

Midtown is getting a makeover, Shakespeare in the Park goes dark in 2021, the city bungled their voting information mailer, the NYPD vs a swan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Photos from the Village Halloween parade. (amNY)

Here’s what you need to know about the election on November 6. (Brokelyn)

Is the closing of Bushwick art gallery Signal the canary in a coal mine for the decline of the neighborhood? Signal closes on November 2 after their final show, “No Signal.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Governor Cuomo restored voting rights to most parolees in April, but someone forgot to tell the city’s Board of Elections, who printed the wrong information in the City Voter Guide mailers. (Bklyner)

2 Penn Plaza is about to get a dramatic revamp starting in 2020. Get ready for midtown to look very different. (Curbed)

All 128 NYC restaurants that were awarded Bib Gourmand status in 2019 (two courses and a glass of wine or dessert is under $40). (Eater)

How many NYPD officers does it take to capture a swan? Watch the video and see. (Gothamist)

Get ready for tight security at the NYC Marathon this Sunday. (Queens Gazette)

The newest addition to the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade’s balloons is “Little Cloud” from the art duo FriendsWithYou, a happy little optimistic cloud. (NY Times)

The creator of the MetroCard, William Wheeler, swiped his last swipe at 69. He worked for the MTA for 32 years and is one of the reasons we don’t still use tokens. (NY Post)

19 bars and restaurants in Astoria to try. (Eater)

Take a tour and dip into the history of of Red Hook’s Erie Basin. (Forgotten NY)

The new Greenpoint Library will not open in December as scheduled due to discoveries of asbestos and the remains of the original Carnegie Library from 1906. (Bklyner)

Check out every publicly accessible waterfront in the city with the interactive Waterfront Access Map. (Curbed)

Shakespeare in the Park will go dark in 2021 when the Delacourt undergoes a $110 million renovation. The renovation is meant to address issues like how the women’s bathroom is extremely far from the amphitheater, making it ADA compliant, and other needed improvements to the stage and backstage areas. Construction is set to being in 2020 and finish in 2022. (NY Times)

Alan Cumming is tending bar. “Why would you want to have a bar otherwise?”

The elevated trains in New York date back to 1868, when the Eiffel Tower was brand new. The trains moved between five and ten miles an hour, which is still faster than the average speed of a Manhattan bus. (Curbed)

City Lab attended the L Train Shutdown Nightmare “experience” before it prematurely closed. They were less than impressed.

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The Briefly for July 18, 2018 – The Gowanus is Eating Whole Foods, Uber Supports Congestion Pricing, and More

New York is suing the US over 2017’s changes to tax law, the first death from Legionnaire’s Disease, SNAP recipients are losing farmer’s markets, and more

Children separated form their parents by ICE at the US’s southern border will get a 48-hour notice before being moved thank to New York City’s Legal Aid Society. Two days may not be much, but it allows lawyers and parents to make a plan.

SNAP recipients may lose their ability to buy produce at farmers markets thanks to a new USDA contract.

Tips to survive the line for Shakespeare in the Park.

New York state is suing the federal government arguing federal tax law changes unfairly targets New York and similar states, raising taxes by $14.3 billion in 2018.

The city announced a $100 million investment to overhaul the city’s freight distribution system and create 5,000 jobs with infrastructure investment, creating new hubs and promoting the use of clean trucks.

Citi Bike is expanding their $5 monthly memberships to 1.8 million additional low-income New Yorkers. Previously it was available to NYCHA residents and the change allows anyone who receives SNAP benefits.

“Taxi King” Gene Freidman must pay $1.3 million to a former employee who accused him of sexual harassment.

The NYPD is working to assign more investigators to work on sexual assault complaints, which were up by 17.4% in June of this year compared to last.

Half of NYC neighborhoods are “transit deserts” for the disabled and elderly. 62 out of 122 neighborhoods don’t have accessible subway stations according to Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office. To rectify this, Stringer is suggested an $8 billion transit bond to improve access.

Filming around town: Erase w/Denis Leary is at 185th St and 69th Ave in Queens, The Sun Is Also A Star is at 32nd St and 5th, Blue Bloods w/Donnie Wahlberg is at 52nd and 9th, Elementary w/Lucy Liu is at Henry St and Pierrepont in Brooklyn, Otherhood w/Jake Lacy is at W 12th and 7th, and Law and Order: SVU is at Inwood Hill Park and W 133rd and 12th.

Governor Cuomo’s campaign may have violated federal privacy laws when soliciting Excelsior Scholarship students to appear in an ad for his re-election.

The first person has died as a result of the Legionnaires’ Disease outbreak in Manhattan. If you have symptoms on pneumonia, see a doctor immediately.

Is the Gowanus Canal trying to eat Whole Foods?

City Councilmember Ruben Diaz Sr is under investigation for misuse of government resources, alleging he improperly used his council email account for political purposes.

Governor Cuomo is finally giving up contributions that were made to his campaign that were made be people connected to the recent Buffalo Billions convictions. The half a million dollars will be donated to various charities that work towards immigrant legal defense, women’s reproductive health rights, and Puerto Rican recovery efforts.

When it rains, it pours… in subway stations.

Artist Jim Bachor is filling potholes with tile mosaics of vermin like rats cockroaches, pigeons, and the current president.

Governor Cuomo added 374 “special assistants” to the state’s payroll, with a combined $33.8 million in salary.

Uber is launching a $1 million effort in support of congestion pricing.