The Briefly for August 12, 2019 – The “LaGuardia Airport: A Hellhole of Hellholes” Edition

Zombie homes, free subways and buses on holidays, the ultra-rich New Yorkers funding Trump’s campaign, the Islanders are leaving Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are extensive, double-check the trains before staying out late. (Subway Weekender)

The second phase of the Hudson Yards construction involves something pretty common to NYC: delays from the MTA. (6sqft)

A history, explanation, and timeline of the LaGuardia construction. (amNY)

Saying LaGuardia Airport sucks in 2019 is underselling the sheer nightmare that is trying to escape the city from an airport where 90% of people are using private transportation to get to. Thursday’s disaster scenario of people walking on the highways and ramps to catch their flights was blamed on it being of the 45 peak travel days for the summer. Between the MTA’s stellar track record for buses, the Port Authority’s control of the airport, the DOT’s control of the roads and individual airlines’ construction on terminals, this is a problem that will persist for years.

Where’s the governor on all of this? He’s called this whole mess “unavoidable,” while also taking no specific action to make traveling to the airport any less hellish. If you’re traveling on any of the 19 “peak” days in August, the Port Authority suggests leaving multiple hours earlier to account for the travel disaster waiting for you. (Gothamist)

The “zombie homes” in Sheepshead bay are becoming a real problem for the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York state has a case against ExxonMobil for misleading its shareholders by lying about knowledge of climate change as early as 1977, and now the state has caught ExxonMobil attempting to intimidate the witnesses. Opening statements are scheduled for October 23. (Inside Climate News)

If you’re the type of person who hates having money and loves martinis, maybe The Algonquin Hotel’s $10,000 martini is for you, which comes with a diamond ring. (Untapped Cities)

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade replaced animals from the Central Park Zoo with balloons in 1927. The company turned to Greenwich Villager Tony Sarg to create the first iconic balloons for the parade. (GVSHP)

Incomplete data and sporadic surveys make measuring storefront vacancies difficult, but a study from the Department of City Planning shows the problem doesn’t exist everywhere in the city. Jackson Heights has the lowest vacancy rate of the areas surveyed at 5.1% compared to Canal Street, which is at 25.9%. (Curbed)

The history of how a natural gas pipeline turned into a 30-mile offshore windfarm. (The Indypendent)

This week’s forced restaurant closures do not disappoint with two different places being closed by the Department of Health, both scoring over 100 violation points in the process. (Patch)

The worry over rentable Revel scooters in Brooklyn and Queens is just that, worry. The company’s mission enjoys rare support from both the Department of Transportation’s Polly Trottenberg and Transportation Alternatives, and if they proved to be dangerous, you’d be reading about the danger they pose to pedestrians in The Briefly on a regular basis. (NY Times)

These are the city’s top high schools. (Patch)

The city is transforming two East Harlem lots into all below-market-rate apartments with 30% set aside for the homeless as part of the East Harlem Housing Plan. (Curbed)

Does no one ride the subways on major holidays because the MTA cuts service or does the MTA cut service because no one rides the subways on holidays? City Councilmember Justin Brannan will propose a non-binding resolution to request the MTA offer free subway and bus service during New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day in a similar fashion to how parking meters are suspended on those days. The MTA is, of course, against anything that would promote more people to take the train or buses. (6sqft)

85% of people stopped for mass transit fare evasion are black or Latinx, which echoes the unmistakable racist enforcement of stop and frisk. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Islanders are getting a permanent home in Belmont Park with a 19,000 seat arena for the team is dead last when it comes to attendance figures for the last two seasons. (QNS)

A list of the 1% of the 1% of New York City that is fueling Trump’s reelection campaign. Of course, the city’s worst musician and Knicks owner James Dolan is on the list. (Gothamist)

The condo board of 25 Central Park West is asking neighbor buildings for money to continue to fight their lawsuit against a protected bike lane that could have saved the life of cyclist Madison Lyden. (Streetsblog)

Mike Chen is testing the six top burgers in the city, which will come out ahead? (Viewing NYC)

Already tired of the 2020 primary race among Democrats? Here is a list of possible 2021 hopefuls for NYC mayor. (amNY)

As Sunset Park becomes more popular thanks to a gentrifying neighborhood and Industry City, Third Avenue’s dangers become more pronounced. The death of Em Samolewicz is one of eight fatalities and 2,000 injuries on Third Ave since 2011. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A judge issued a stay and once again blocked the 14th St busway from becoming a reality. Every single headline about this story has used some variation of the phrase “slams brakes on” like it was legally mandated. (Downtown Express)

29% of the 15,500 structural components at subway stations were found to be worn or damaged, and that number is up since 2012. Comforting, right? (amNY)

Anti-ICE protestors shut down the West Side Highway at 26th St on Saturday for an hour. (Splinter)

Were you among the 10,253 people treated by the FDNY between 2011 and 2018 whose personal information, including social security number, was accidentally left on a hard drive and misplaced? (amNY)

The New York Philharmonic’s Free Fridays are returning, giving away tickets to people between 13 and 26 with an online reservation system. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jeffrey Epstein is dead of an apparent suicide, but the investigation into his crimes is not. The FBI and prosecutors will turn their attention to his accomplices. (NY Times)

The city’s 19th cyclist was killed by a teenage driver on Sunday in Midwood. (Brooklyn Paper)

City Hall Park is now adorned by “Estructuras Monumentales“, works by 104-year-old local artist Carmen Herrera and will be on display through November 8. (Downtown Express)

A deep look into Corey Johnson’s plans to kill the city’s car culture. (Gotham Gazette)

35 solid happy hours. (Eater)

The Briefly for January 25, 2019 – The “25% Faster Than Slow is Still Pretty Slow” Edition

Weekend subway change, Dunkin owns the city, a beer to pair with the L train, the Gowanus Canal flushes its sewage tanks, the 2021 elections, and more.

Here is a complete list of trains with no service changes or disruptions this weekend: G, L and Q. Everyone else? Better check the trains before you go anywhere. (6sqft)

The mayor wants to increase bus speeds by 25%. The average speed of an MTA bus is 8.4 mph. (Metro)

The Gowanus Canal cleanup is changing designs slightly from a pair of tanks to into a tunnel to catch the sewage flowing from Park Slope. Rather than two 6 million gallon tanks, it’ll be a one half mile long tunnel 150 feet underground that will hold 16 million gallons of Poop Slope. (Curbed)

The MTA board met to vote on a fare hike for March and they… opted to delay the vote. A fare hike seemed all but certain until the Governor announced that he is opposed to the fare hike. (NY Times)

311’s technology was put into place in 2003 and it hasn’t been updated since. That all changes this July. (Gotham Gazette)

A tale of two states. New York is split on the plastic bag ban, government sponsored health care and congestion pricing, but are unified in support of giving the police the authority to remove guns from violent people, legalizing marijuana and raising the age to buy cigarettes and tobacco from 18 to 21. (Legislative Gazette)

People are already entering the 2021 race for city comptroller. Early candidates are City Council Members Brad Lander and Helen Rosenthal. (Gotham Gazette)

This is a new reason for a subway delay. (@NYCTSubways)

Visualizing income taxes in NYC in 2018. (r/dataisbeautiful)

You find $90 on the ground on the subway. What do you do? (NY Times)

Take a look at the new Amtrak space in Moynihan Train Hall/the new Penn Station. (6sqft)

The third victim in the Sheepshead Bay Seaport Buffet hammer attack died. The alleged attacker was inspired by a movie about Chinese men mistreating women. (NY Post)

“Nice charter schools you got here. Shame if something happened to them.” The city’s school chancellor has some vague threats for charter schools. (NY Post)

Finally, the perfect beer to pair with trying to figure out the new L train closures. (Bedford + Bowery)

City Councilmember Ydanis A. Rodriguez is calling on the NYPD to put cases of confiscated electric bikes on hold, calling them biased against working people. (Metro)

The city is mobilizing the new NYPD unit aimed specifically at cars in the bus lane. Moving violations are up 612%. (Curbed)

The number of chain stores in Manhattan decreased in 2018, but one neighborhood bused that trend in a major way: The Lower East Side. Also a quick bit of trivia: Dunkin Donuts has the distinction of being the chain with the most locations in the city with 624. (Bowery Boogie)

Noticed the Shen Huen posters everywhere? So has Reddit. (r/NYC)

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The Briefly for January 21, 2019 – The “No Solo Women Allowed at the Bar” Edition

Prep school students’ blackface video goes public, the blind subway magician, the mayor’s broken ebike promises, food carts get health grades, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you’re trying to get around at night and you live on the 1, 6, 7, A, F, or Q, you might want to avoid the subways. (Subway Changes)

Join the Parks Department for the Martin Luther King Jr Day nationally-observered day of service in parks in Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx. (NYC Parks)

The restaurant Nello is banning solo women from sitting at the bar thanks to, and this is not a joke, “a crackdown on hookers.” (Eater)

Have you seen Olmedo Renteria, a 78-year-old renowned magician, on the subway? A lifelong performer, he has not let his loss of sight slow him down. (NY Times)

The city’s Housing Preservation and Development agency is being sued as part of a class-action lawsuit for violating the Violence Against Women Act. (Gothamist)

Rezoning in New York City has historically lead to evictions, harassment, and racial segregation. Churches United for Fair Housing is proposing a Racial Impact Study before future rezoning takes place. (Bushwick Daily)

The scientific study that there is built-in white supremacy in Yelp reviews that criticize to “authenticity.” (Eater)

Next time Whoopi Goldberg or anyone opens their mouth about how bike lanes inconvenience drivers, remember Madison Jane Lyden, who would not be dead if Central Park West had a protected bike lane. (NY Post)

That did not stop her. (Streetsblog)

What is in Willets Point’s future? Affordable housing and potentially a soccer stadium. (6sqft)

Stop by the Ace Hotel New York to see a revival of Reverend Jen Miller’s Trolls museum, once referred to as a remnant o the “real Lower East Side.” Yes, Trolls like the dolls. (Untapped Cities)

WeWork’s CEO has ben personally buying properties to lease them to his company. That seems weird, right? (The Real Deal)

11 go-to restaurants and bars near Union Square. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio broke his promise of how the NYPD would enforce his ban on electric bikes. City law states businesses are liable for the $500 fine that their workers receive. The NYPD seized 910 bikes and issued 669 tickets and 1,383 moving violations. Only 210 businesses were given citations. (Gothamist)

A second person has died as a result of the Sheepshead Bay hammer attack. The third victim remains in critical condition. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

If you think getting around in a snowstorm in 2019 is tough (not that we’ve had one yet), imagine having to convince a horse to go out into a storm. (NY Times)

All 5,500 food carts in the city will receive health inspections. 24 have been inspected since late December. Only 5,476 to go. (NY Post)

“Don’t look behind the curtain. We’re dead. This is for you.” There was a double suicide at Yotel New York on Friday, and they left a tip for the cleaning crew. (NY Post)

How the federal shutdown affects SNAP benefits. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Scenes from the Women’s March. (Gothamist)

Today in “caught in blackface,” here are freshmen from the $50,000 a year Poly Prep Country Day School in blackface dancing around their home. (NY Post)

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