The Briefly for December 4-5, 2020 – The “Where to Cry in Public” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The vaccine arrives in NYC by December 15, Marie’s Crisis reopens, the Dyker Heights lights are back (with controversy), and more

Today – Low: 45˚ High: 51˚
Rain starting in the afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 32˚ High: 46˚

Get a jump on January and learn how to run in the winter. (Jen A. Miller for NY Times)

The state’s Green Light Law, which allowed undocumented immigrants to apply for driver’s licenses, survived a federal appeals court challenge. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

12 new public art installations this month. (Untapped New York)

There’s a screenshot of the best places to cry in NYC making its way around the internet but experienced public cryers will know there was an entire Tumblr account dedicated to places to cry. (NYC Crying Guide)

Gothamist wants your help to write NYC a love letter for 2020. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Video: Did you see (and hear) the terrifying sights and sounds of the Verrazzano Bridge on Monday during the storm? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Remember that guy who experienced a living nightmare of falling 12 feet through the sidewalk into a sinkhole that was full of rats where he was trapped for 30 minutes? He’s suing. It doesn’t matter what the amount is, it isn’t enough. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Meet Charles Barry, who has been scamming subway riders for nearly 40 years and has been arrested about 160 times. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Marie’s Crisis is ready to open again on December 8 at a 25% capacity, allowing only 15 patrons in at a time. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

A list of NYC-themed gifts. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

“These employees allegedly worked very hard – to steal MTA time and money,” say hello to the five MTA employees accused of “brazen, repeated” overtime fraud. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: The construction of the Statue of Liberty. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

It’s the future site of 1,000 below-market-rate apartments and according to the EPA, it’s also home to a ton of toxic pollution a few feet underground. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Staten Island’s Mac’s Public House declared itself an “autonomous zone” from the state’s Covid-19 laws. It’s co-owner Danny Presti was arrested. This was followed by a swam of shitheads gathering to protest. The zip code has the fourth-highest Covid-19 positivity rate in the city. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Two dozen subway cars were hit by a graffiti storm over the weekend, hitting the 1, 6, M, G, and Q lines. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Photos: The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree is lit. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Despite what you may have read in this very newsletter, you don’t actually need a ticket to see the Christmas tree, but they are limiting the number of people who can be in the plaza at once. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The history of the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Looking for a less auspicious holiday light display? Check out this Google Doc with almost 30 holiday light displays across the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Speaking of holiday displays, the Dyker Heights Christmas lights are coming back this year, and people are not happy about it. 2020, amirite? (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

6 department store holiday windows to check out. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

RIP Betsy Wade, the first woman to edit news copy for The New York Times. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

The city can’t move the homeless New Yorkers from the Upper West Side’s Lucerne Hotel for at least two more weeks after an Appellate Court issued a temporary stay that prevents the city from moving them. This story has been ongoing since July. (Mirela Iverac for Gothamist)

It’s looking more and more like auditions for city schools’ performing arts programs will be moving online. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Outdoor dining is looking more and more like indoor dining. Bedford + Bowery asks and answers if it’s safe. The answer is that it is not. (Justin McGowan for Bedford + Bowery)

A new report that looks at data from 121 cities over 10 years shows that mass transit is not a significant vector for spreading viruses. That being said, wear your damn masks on the subway. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Photos: Inside NYC’s biggest Covid-19 lab. (Elizabeth Kim with photos by Scott Heins for Gothamist)

78% of the surveyed restaurant workers report hostile behavior from customers when staff try to enforce COVID-19 safety rules according to a new study from the One Fair Wage advocacy group. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

New York will get 170,000 doses of the Covid-19 vaccine by December 15, according to Governor Cuomo. The first phase of distribution will be focused on healthcare workers and residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Unboxing videos on YouTube hit their peak in popularity around 2014, but that didn’t stop Governor Cuomo’s live unboxing of an empty Pfizer vaccine box during a press conference this week. “What’s up, it’s ya boy Gov Cuomo and today we’re unboxing a vaccine. Remember to like, comment, and subscribe if you wanna see more content like this in the future and also to smash that bell icon to get notifications because you might miss a video if you don’t.” (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The CDC shortened its recommended quarantine to 10 days, but included a plea to just stop traveling. Roni Caryn Rabin for NY Times)

Dr Fauci, who will be staying on with the Biden administration, said we could get “back to normal, or at least approaching close to normal, as you get into the late summer and early fall,” if 75-85% of Americans get vaccinated. This was in response to a question about Broadway reopening, which has been closed since March 12 of this year. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The New York Blood Center fears a blood shortage. Here’s how to help. (Ron Lee for NY1)

10 holiday markets, pop-ups, and sales this weekend. (the skint)

The Briefly for Halloween, 2020 – The “No Need to Socially Distance from Ghosts” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: A look at the spooky, scary celebration of Halloween along with all the ghoulish and ghastly NYC stories, and the best pumpkin dishes.

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 55˚
Rain throughout the day.

Trick or treat is not banned in New York City. the city released Halloween guidelines. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Okay, so the Village Halloween parade is canceled, but it will be replaced by a tiny puppet parade. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Photos: Just outside the city in Croton-on-Hudson, the pandemic can’t stop the Great Jack O’ Lantern Blaze. (Jen Carlson, photos by Tod Seelie for Gothamist)

A strange little girl, a little boy, the crying lady ghost, and the other ghosts that haunt The Dakota on 72nd St. (Ephemeral New York)

Eat all the candy you want this Halloween, you’ve earned it. But the wrappers? Say hello to the Trick or Trash, here to help you recycle your candy wrappers. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

Photos: Brooklyn’s best decorated Halloween house. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Do you know about Manhattan’s secret graveyards? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

This isn’t a Halloween story, but it’s still terrifying. A fully intact rat skeleton fell from the ceiling of a Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development apartment building on Forsythe St. (Elie Z. Perler Bowery Boogie)

Meet James Sheehan, who has almost 100 people buried in his Astoria backyard. (Jason D Antos for Give Me Astoria)

So some of the city’s Halloween traditions won’t be happening this year, but you can still see Zohra, the giant, sparkling spider between 7 pm and 10 pm hanging off the Jefferson Market Library Tower in the East Village. (Shay Weaver for Time Out)

There are plenty of nightmares to be found across the city, but none of them are as scary as the man who fell into a sinkhole and into a rat-filled chasm for 30 minutes while waiting for a bus. (Hirir Zaveri for NY Times)

Video: Walking the haunted village of Sleepy Hollow. (ActionKid on YouTube)

A guide for trick or treating in 2020. (Ashly Grzyb for Red Tricycle)

The filming locations of Ghostbusters. (On the Set of New York)

Governor Cuomo hasn’t said you have to socially distance from ghosts this Halloween. The 13 most haunted places in the city. (John Garry for Fodors)

Have you ever seen the (Will Sabel Courtney, Jeremy Winograd, Peter Kirby and Michele Herrmann for Time Out)

The Chicest, Creepiest Rich People Halloween Decorations In NYC. (Christie Grimm for Guest of a Guest)

The 10 best pumpkin dishes in NYC. (Devorah Lev-Tov for Thrillist)

Looking for some Halloween entertainment? My wife has a new podcast: The Night Hags. In the first episode, they talk about the significance of Halloween and The Exorcist to them personally.

The Briefly for June 29, 2020 – The “Even Aliens and UFOs Have Left New York” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Macy’s unannounced fireworks start tonight, the NYPD pepper-sprays a Pride march, open street dining, beaches opening this week and more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

Get ready, because tonight starts Macy’s ill-conceived fireworks displays across the city for the next five nights. The city said they will send notifications a few minutes before they start(Ron Lee for NY1)

The story of Charlie H. Cochrane, Jr., the NYPD’s first openly gay cop, who joined the force in 1967. (Carey Reed Zamarriego for Untapped Cities)

Photos: Pride Weekend’s Drag March. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

More Photos: The Drag March. (EV Grieve)

The NYPD celebrated Pride in their traditional style by pepper-spraying and arresting participants of the Queer Liberation March during a dance party in Washington Square Park. (Duncan Osborne for Gothamist)

Answering questions about the availability of the NYPD’s disciplinary records, which will become available in July. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

17 members of the city’s Corrections Department will face departmental charges for their roles in the death of Rikers Island inmate Layleen Polanco last June. Bronx District Attorney Darcel D. Clark and the city’s Department of Investigation have refused to pursue criminal charges. (Jan Ransom and Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

How Occupy City Hall’s 24-hour protests came to be. (Juliana Kim, photos by Amr Alfiky for NY Times)

“Yet on day one of his mayoralty, de Blasio betrayed his word—and even more, the Black and Hispanic communities of New York City—by bringing back an even more blatantly discriminatory policing strategy: the practice of aggressive misdemeanor arrests known as “broken windows policing.””
-Bernard E. Harcourt, professor of law and political science at Columbia University, for Gothamist, Mayor De Blasio’s Police Strategy Has Always Been Racist

The number of UFOs reported across America in the first three months of the year shot up by 112%, but New York’s UFO sightings are among the country’s lowest. Even the aliens know it’s not a good time to see the city. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The headline says it best: The Garbage-Scented, Siren-Laden, and Yet Still Pleasant Reality of Dining Outside Right Now (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

There are over 5,650 restaurants open for outdoor dining in the city, the Department of Transportation has an interactive map. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Maybe some of these locations need to be double-checked since they’re in the middle of bike lanes, which is forbidden by the new guidelines. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The experience of a day of phase two inside Veselka. (Ryan Sutton, photos by Gary He for Eater)

Six ways restaurants have been innovating to enforce social distancing. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The state has extended its to-go cocktail laws for an additional 30 days. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Five years of lessons learned from writing about food and dining. (Serena Dai for Eater, good luck on your new gig)

“For years, the NYPD has used the city’s public drinking laws as a simple pretext for the harassment of communities of color. Of the 15 city police precincts that wrote the most summonses for open-containers in 2010, 12 were located in communities of color. A separate Brooklyn study found that 85 percent of open container citations in that borough were given to Black and brown residents, and only 4 percent to whites.”
-Shabazz Stuart, CEO of Oonee, for Streetsblog, It’s Time to Legalize Public Drinking for All New Yorkers

Dog runs, basketball courts, tennis courts, volleyball courts, handball courts, and bocce courts are returning to the city’s parks with phase three. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Everything known about indoor dining, which starts on July 6 in phase three of the city’s reopening. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

For the second time in two decades, the MTA is facing a “doomsday budget.” (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

James Dolan owns Madison Square Garden and the Knicks and might be one of the biggest idiots in the entire city. The CDC’s website with information on Covid-19 antibodies clearly states “Having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 might provide protection from getting infected with the virus again. If it does, we do not know how much protection the antibodies might provide or how long this protection might last.” Has that stopped James Dolan from saying he wants to fill Madison Square Garden with people who have tested positive for antibodies for a benefit show? No it has not. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

A deeper dive into the Summer Youth Employment Program, how its elimination by the de Blasio administration disproportionally affects people of color, and why kids are fighting to bring it back. (Rainer Harris for Curbed)

Red Hook’s Fairway will close by July 17. The landlord will look for a grocery store to take its place. (Liena Zagare for BKLYNER)

Mayor de Blasio is calling for a full eviction moratorium through August 20 and for the state place tenants who miss rent on a year-long payment plan to make up for back rent once they are able to work. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

New York Hall of Science won’t be reopening in 2020, opting for a 2021 date. (Bill Parry for QNS)

Getting students into classrooms in the fall, if that is an option at all, will be a difficult task. The CDC calling for children to be six feet apart, which would be impossible in the city’s 150 schools that are already operating at a capacity of 150% or more. For instance, Francis Lewis High School in Queens is built for 2,188, has 4,492 students and capacity will have to be cut to around 1,000. Whatever happens, school will not be returning to normal in the fall. (Ashleigh Garrison for Chalkbeat)

RIP Milton Glaser, who created the I ♥ NY logo. (William Grimes for NY Times)

It’s a great apartment that will be plagued with construction noise through 2035, but you’ll be close to the trains! (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Spring training hasn’t begun yet and Vegas is already predicting a better season for the Yankees than the Mets. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

St. Patrick’s Cathedral welcomed people for Sunday Mass for the first time since March. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s affordable housing lottery is anything but fair to the people who can afford the least. For each apartment available for “extremely low-income” families there are 650 applicants. That is nearly 5x as many applicants for apartments for families making between $122k and $168k/year. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Sunday’s double rainbow. What does it mean? (EV Grieve)

Do you know what this city doesn’t need? A sinkhole problem. A sinkhole nearly ate an SUV on the Lower East Side over the weekend. (EV Grieve)

There are nine NYC beaches opening for swimming on July 1st. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Thanks to reader Jenny for today’s featured photo!