The Briefly for December 27, 2019: The “Rudest City? I’ll Show You How Rude This City Can Get” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The electric bike bill is dead, the “gentrification tax” debate, meet State Assembly hopeful Emily Gallagher, the most beautiful restaurants of 2019 & more

Today – Low: 39˚ High: 52˚
Overcast throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 35˚ High: 48˚

It’s not the weekend without subway disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

The city’s lights never dim, but why? Turns out New York earned the nickname “The City That Never Sleeps.” (Derek M. Norman for NY Times)

New York City has a idling problem. Yes, idling trucks have been in issue for years, but one truck is nothing compared to cruise ships, which pump the city’s air full of 1,200 tons of toxic fumes every year. (Lisa M. Collins for NY Times)

New York City is the rudest city in America according to the dumb yokel idiots at Business Insider. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

If 2019 was the year of the “pied-à-terre tax” debate, 2020 will be the year of the gentrification tax debate. Currently, homebuyers pay taxes based on the assessed value of the home, which is usually lower than the market value in gentrifying neighborhoods. The lead to change the law is being led by Republican City Councilmember Joe Borelli. Speaker Corey Johnson has said it’s “highly unlikely it will get fixed” this session. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

We missed a white Christmas and it looks like we’ll miss a white New Year’s Eve as well. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What were the top restaurant standbys of the year for the staff of Eater? (Eater)

Don’t play on the ice in city parks. Two boys earned that lesson the hard way, but they were rescued by a friend. If you’re ever in this unfortunate circumstance, these are why there are rescue ladders all around. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Did you recently buy Egg White Salad and Old Fashioned Potato Salad from Trader Joe’s? There’s a recall. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

They’ve been mum on details, but the NYPD has located the third suspend in Tessa Majors’s stabbing. (Mark Hellum for amNewYork)

What’s in a nickname? What’s the origin of The Big Apple? (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

Governor Cuomo wants to put a high-speed train system to connect New York City with upstate and is assemble a panel of engineers to review feasibility. For a low cost of $14 billion, the trains will go 77 mph instead of 51 mph. The current average speed of the subway is 17mph. Maybe we could use $14 billion to improve that instead. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The governor vetoed the electric bike and scooter bill that overwhelmingly passed the legislature in Albany. The legislature is out of session, so despite veto-proof majorities, it’s nearly impossible to override the veto. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Congratulations to the jackass who drove their car into the protected pedestrian lane of the Pulaski Bridge. (Greenpointers)

Mulchfest has begun! (Todd Maisel for amNewYork)

Meet Greenpoint’s Emily Gallagher, an activist and primary challenger against the 77-year-old Joe Lentol who has been in the State Assembly since 1973. Gallagher is running on a progressive platform of environmental sustainability, housing justice, and transit improvement. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

The most beautiful restaurants of the year. (Serena Dai for Eater)

The Briefly for May 5, 2019 – The “Pole Dancing Rats Are So Last Week” Edition

The future of Sunnyside Yards, dollar oysters, the prettiest block in the city, Jeff Bezos buys an apartment, the appeal of a rear-facing apartment and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Is this a video of cops fighting each other in Harlem, or is it a video of people dressed as cops fighting each other in Harlem? That stupid question is what the NYPD would like you to ask. (Gothamist)

Rumors keep saying that New York City Transit president Andy Byford is on his way out the door. Someone tell Andy, because he reportedly just signed a new lease. (Gothamist)

Let’s not forget the cold history between the governor and Byford, who spend the first few months of the year never speaking to one another directly. (Second Ave Sagas)

Maybe Andy should leave. Governor Cuomo is cutting over three billion from the MTA budget over the next three years. (Daily News)

Pole dancing rats on the subway are so last week. This week it’s all about a loose bat on the F Train. (Gothamist)

The views ain’t great, the light is limited, but it’s hard to fight the appeal of a rear-facing apartment. (StreetEasy)

The Yemeni bodega owners’ protest of the New York Post has cost the newspaper an estimated $270,000 since the protest started two months ago. (The Indypendent)

Get ready wave hello to Rikers Island’s latest prisoner: Paul Manafort. (Patch)

The Death By Audio Arcade’s new home at Wonderville is open on the border of Bushwick and Bed-Stuy. Take a look at photos of the inside. (Gothamist)

Bumble is opening a cafe and wine in Soho this fall. According to Bumble, it’ll also be a place to hold business meetings and meet friends, so if you see a non-single friend in there, don’t freak out. (6sqft)

Apparently, NYC is a great place for a staycation. That’s a great suggestion because people keep dying on Mount Everest. (Patch)

Linda Fairstein, one of the lead prosecutors of the Central Park Five case, resigned her position at Vassar after a student petition with over 10,000 signatures was asking for her full removal. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’ve been asking yourself “electric mopeds, smart cars, bikes, what’s next?” San Francisco is about to receive rentable pogo sticks. (Curbed)

Rent is high, but at least we’re not San Francisco. (Viewing NYC)

If you’re pool hunting this summer, don’t forget to check out Roosevelt Island’s Manhattan Park Pool Club. (Curbed)

Bluestockings in the Lower East Side gets the Atlas Obscura treatment. (Atlas Obscura)

Pastis has reopened after a five-year hiatus. (NY Times)

He couldn’t get a three billion dollar tax break, but Jeff Bezos willing to pay $80 million for a 17,000 square foot apartment in 212 Fifth Ave. (The Real Deal)

10 important lighthouses in the city. Honestly, can you think of one lighthouse in the city? You’re probably surprised there’s enough for a list. (6sqft)

A brief history of SummerStage in Central Park. (Gothamist)

New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams was arrested during a tenants-rights protest in Albany. (Patch)

Eight people have been arrested as part of the city’s crackdown of fake parking placards. Maybe next they’ll address abuse of legitimate placards. (amNY)

Declawing cats is now illegal in the state of New York. (NY Times)

The whole Governors Ball situation just keeps getting worse. The latest is accusations that the guards used excessive force. (BrooklynVegan)

Leonard Swanson, an NYPD officer, was suspended after allegedly choking his girlfriend on Monday night. (Gothamist)

Station Square: “The Prettiest Block in New York” (NY Mag)

2019 could be the busiest year for the city’s skyline. 16 towers are being planned or are currently under construction that top out at over 1,000 feet. To give perspective, there are currently only nine towers in the city at that height. (NY Times)

Could the Sunnyside Yards project become the next Hudson Yards? With a possible 24,000 new apartments built over the railroad yard decks, is a second Hudson Yards a reasonable idea for a borough that already has Long Island City’s luxury housing and could the project still happen without the inclusion of luxury housing? (The Indypendent)

Dollar oyster deals in the city, mapped. (Eater)

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