The Briefly for September 22 – 24, 2020 – The “Anarchist Rat Cluster Jurisdiction” Tuesday Edition

Tuesday’s NYC news digest: The NYPD Chinese spy, RBG’s statue may have a home, the MTA’s bad day, indoor dining, some kids reutrn to school, and more

Today – Low: 59˚ High: 72˚
Clear throughout the day.

Everything known about outdoor dining, which kicks up again on September 30. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

It was a bad day for the MTA as an A train derailed inside the 14th St/8th Ave station as a result of “an act of vandalism” and the person responsible has reportedly been arrested. (Jen Chung and John Del Signore for Gothamist)

A 40-year-old man was fatally struck by a Manhattan-bound Q train during the evening rush hour on Monday at the Cortelyou Road Station in Flatbush. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

There were 295 subway windows smashed so far this year, which represents a 64% increase over last year. Reminds me of the Dumbo Car Window Smasher from a dozen years ago. (Jose Martinez for The City)

It’s been five years since Pizza Rat. Say hello to the rat cluster, a living nightmare for all to see. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

New York City is now an “anarchist jurisdiction” in the eyes of the federal government. As stupid as this new title is, it is setting the stage for a fight over federal funding for the city. (Monique Judge for The Root)

It wouldn’t be a story without a “Twitter responds to…” post about it. (Elyse Wanshel for HuffPost)

“The president can’t supersede the law and say ‘I’m going to make those funds basically discretionary funds,’ which is what he would have to do. He doesn’t control federal funding. Federal law controls federal funding.” –Governor Cuomo on the designation. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

Brooklyn Bridge Park may be the home of Governor Cuomo’s planned statue honoring Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

In a quote that he will eventually regret saying, Mayor de Blasio said “I feel very good about the trajectory we’re on” regarding the first day of schools being open to students. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

An interactive map showing which schools had recent Covid-19 cases. (Jake Dobkin, Clarisa Diaz for Gothamist)

46% of city students opted for remote learning, up from last week’s 42%. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Congrats to Punkie Johnson, the first out Black lesbian member to join SNL. (Matt Tracy for amNewYork Metro)

The state’s ban on plastic bags will be enforced starting on October 19. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Photo Essay: Phil Buehler’s Bushwick: Art or Garbage. (Phil Buehler for Bushwick Daily)

Photo: Take a look at all the ways to cross the Brooklyn Bridge in 1903. (Ephemeral New York)

Photo: A subway tribute to RBG. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Are restaurant “space bubbles” a good idea or just another sad reality in 2020? (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Nearly 90% of NYC bars and restaurants were unable to pay full rent in August, with 34% unable to pay any rent at all. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The week’s most batshit-wild story is the story of an NYPD officer that is accused of spying on Tibetans for China. (Nicole Hong for NY Times)

The DOE’s long-promised vow to make yeshivas violating state education requirements start teaching the subjects they’re supposed to is once again falling behind. This is one of the longest running stories of Mayor de Blasio’s failure to stand up for what is right in the city and it will continue to roll on. The city blew its deadline to produce a timeline for when state-mandated instruction would be in place and missed another deadline to finish meetings by June. This all started when he deliberately hid this failure from the public so he could convince Albany he was capable of running the city’s schools and he’ll run out the clock without doing literally anything about it. (Reuven Blau for The City)

State Attorney General Letitia James has stepped in and declared that her office will release body camera footage of police-involved deaths after previously leaving it up to local jurisdictions. This was spurred by the death of Daniel Prude in Rochester. (Sydney Periera for Gothamist)

A look at mayoral candidate and City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s affordable housing plan. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

The best outdoor date night spots in NYC, while it’s still warm enough for an outdoor date. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Apartment Porn: Inside the amenities in Long Island City’s Skyline Tower, like the pet spa and 75-foot pool. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A bike brisket tour of NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Reynard Loki for today’s featured photo

The Briefly for September 18-19, 2020 – The “Two Protests Fall in Love” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: School openings delayed, the most dangerous ride in Coney Island, details on SNL’s new season, a guide to eating outdoors, and more

Today – Low: 51˚ High: 69˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 50˚ High: 65˚

Human Turd Eric Trump has agreed to be interviewed by the state’s attorney general into the financing of Trump properties, but only after the presidential election. (Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

The latest figures has NYC’s unemployment rate at 16% compared to the rest of the country’s 8.4%. When the rest of the country’s unemployment rate was 3.5% in February, it was 3.4% in the city. (Greg David for The City)

Photos: At this point, it’s anyone’s guess why people are protesting outside Mayor de Blasio’s home. Actually, two independent protests met outside Gracie Mansion, and like a 2020 romantic comedy, they came together over their common hatred of the mayor. (Photos by Denice Flores Almendares for Gothamist)

In an almost cruel move, the mayor is still walking about laying off 22,000 city workers. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Three months after Mayor de Blasio announced that the NYPD would stop ticketing street vendors, the NYPD took to Twitter to boast about ticketing street vendors. Christine Chung for The Dity)

Mayor de Blasio halted the decision to evict hundreds of homeless men from a temporary shelter in a hotel on the Upper West Side, but families had already started being moved out of other shelters to make room for them. A perfect de Blasio decision, no positive impact but plenty of repercussions. The worst of everything. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about the de Blasio caused Upper West Side homeless shelter saga. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

It only took a few days after business leaders sent him a letter asking him to do exactly this, but our simp mayor is now starting to talk about how companies should be sending people back to their offices. Do not be fooled by the low “rate of infection” that city and state officials throw around. The effective reproduction rate in New York still indicates that the virus is spreading and not diminishing. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The NY Taxi Workers union shut down the Brooklyn Bridge, the Queensboro Bridge, and FDR Drive on Thursday in a protest demanding debt forgiveness for cabbies hit hard by the pandemic. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Photos: Inside Keith Haring’s last apartment in NYC. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A firetruck t-boned an ambulance early on Thursday morning in Brooklyn, killing the man in the ambulance and injuring 12. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Is the New York yoga studio dead? (Ted Alcorn for NY Times)

On Tuesday, I introduced a City Council bill [read it here] to clear the red tape that’s allowed for racially biased, anti-pedestrian policies. The bill will effectively decriminalize “jaywalking,” which, it should be noted, was a term invented by the auto industry to shame pedestrians.
– Costa Constantinides, Astoria’s representative in City Council, Here’s Why We Should Decriminalize ‘Jaywalking’ for Streetsblog

The hopes for the Industry City rezoning hinges on the owners adding 20,000 new jobs, but even members of the service workers union that represents the current workers are losing faith in the owners. The union technically supports the rezoning, but they still haven’t reached an agreement with the site’s management since it opened in April of 2019. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

What’s the most dangerous ride in Coney Island? It might be the ferry if the city’s chosen location gets built. The city’s location is in a dangerously polluted creek that also has a few unexploded bombs sitting at the bottom of it. The locals if you could imagine, arent happy with the location. (The Coney Island Blog)

Remember I asked if the $50 fines on the subway for not wearing a mask? It took ONE day for someone to film two police officers not wearing masks in a subway station and being shits about it. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: A hazy NYC as the smoke from the West Coast has reached the east coast. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

North Brooklyn environmentalists and Pratt Institute have created an interactive map charting historic environmental pollution in Greenpoint, Williamsburg, and adjacent neighborhoods. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

When SNL starts up again in October they will have a live crowd and Jim Carry will be portraying Joe Biden, Maya Rudolph will return as Kamala Harris, and Alec Baldwin will also be back for the new season. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Sam Moyer’s Doors for Doris, built from leftover pieces of stone from around the world and cemented into doors can now be found at the Doris C. Freedman Plaza entrance to Central Park at 60th St. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Will the Hudson Yards need a second bailout? The city’s already provided $5.6 billion in tax breaks in hopes of making the money back. Sounds like a crazy idea? We already bailed it out after the 2008 crash. (Neil de Mause for Gothamist)

The city is opening a new lab to process Covid-19 tests and cut down wait times as school is almost in session and indoor dining is scheduled to start at the end of the month. The hope is that the lab will eventually process 40,000 tests a day. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

How to get a virus test result in under 48 hours. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Listen, just get a flu shot. At this point, let’s get the upper hand on any illness we possibly can. (Zainab Iqbal for Bklyner)

California, Hawaii, Maryland, Minnesota, Nevada and Ohio are off the state’s quarantine travel list, but Puerto Rico has been added. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Apartment Porn: Chloe Sevigny’s $3.25 million prewar Park Slope apartment overlooking Prospect Park is for sale. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

A yeshiva in Queens continued holding in-person classes this week after the Mayor’s Office announced the school was shut down after more than a dozen students tested positive for coronavirus. Health officials returned and shut the school down a second time. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Is the city ready for electric scooter ride-sharing? (Dan Rivoli for NY1)

7 things we still don’t know about the school year in NYC, but really should. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

A look into how the city’s “Situation Room” for Covid-19 monitoring at schools. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Here are the 56 schools with positive Covid-19 cases before the school year even starts in person. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The city already delayed in-person classes once and now they’re doing it again. Students will come back into classes in phases, starting with younger children first. I was told by a friend that this is the plan that the UFT suggested weeks ago but the mayor balked at. High schools will open on October 1. Always a last-second decision from this city. (Elisa Shapiro for NY Times)

Some students, even if they’re participating in “in-person” classes, will be logging on and actually having their classes virtually while sitting in classrooms. The high number of students that opted out of in-person classes is causing a staffing problem. All of the inconvenience and fear of sending your child to a school building with none of the benefits of them learning in a classroom! (Yoav Gonen from The City and Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The city’s blended approach to education will cost an additional $32 million a week. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

With fall here, can we still go apple picking? (Eliane Glusac for NY Times)

The governor used the figure that the MTA lost $300 million due to fare evasion a year to justify hiring 500 new NYPD officers to patrol the subways. Turns out that number is very wrong. Can we have our money back instead of these subway cops? (Jose Martinez for The City)

The ultimate guide to outdoor dining. (Eater)

Thanks to Sandra for today’s featured photo of some turtle friends!

The Briefly for May 5, 2020 – The “100s of Miles of Hell for His Downstairs Neighbors” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor bans all outdoor First Amendment activities, a tale of two cities of NYPD social distancing enforcement, where to order healthy delivery & more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 61˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

The city’s doctors are bringing their attention to a new mystery illness that is affecting children and is potentially tied to COVID-19. The symptoms are similar to toxic shock syndrome or Kawasaki disease and have affected children ages 2 to 15. All 15 children identified with this mystery illness have been hospitalized. There have also been some cases of the mystery illness in European children. If a child displays the symptoms of fever, rash, abdominal pain, or vomiting, contact a doctor immediately. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

A look at 13 times in history that the NYC subway shut down. (Noah Shiedlower for Untapped New York)

Michael Ortiz set out to run 100 miles a week for 100 weeks, happening inside his Brooklyn apartment, and for some reason, the Times didn’t ask a single question of his downstairs neighbors. (Christopher Solomon for NY Times)

A true COVID-19 comedy of errors. When Dorothea Buschell died in Bay Ridge, her family wasn’t notified. She had a burial plot in Farmingdale, but her body was sent to and buried in a Morganville, N.J. cemetery. Her family, including comedian Elayne Boosler, was charged for tolls to get the body to New Jersey, a dress, makeup, gratuities, clergy, a mahogany casket, a cross and rosary beads, and all for a Jewish woman. The body? It can’t be interred in the right cemetery until the pandemic is over. (Virginia Breen for The City)

Brooklyn’s 39th Street Pier is being used as a long-term morgue storage facility with freezer trucks storing bodies so families can claim the bodies of their loved ones. This is instead of temporarily burying bodies on Hart Island, where the bodies of 522 COVID-19 victims were buried. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Video: Oddly satisfying time-lapses of the NYC skyline and Brooklyn Bridge being drawn (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The NYPD shouldn’t be enforcing social distancing. That’s the message from Police Benevolent Association President Patrick Lynch, who cites vague guidelines and mixed messages, leaving cops to “fend for themselves.” He also said the NYPD is being “thrown under the bus” referring to the video of an officer making an arrest by threatening to tase a bystander and arresting him by punching him in the head multiple times. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The NYPD doesn’t seem to be great with following directions, even when they’re provided, as evidence by the four officers who saved a cat that was stuck inside a car’s engine. In the photos, three of four officers are wearing no face mask. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Francisco Garcia, the NYPD officer based on his shield number, who was responsible for the violent arrest in the East Village, has been the subject of seven civil lawsuits in the last five years. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Police Commissioner Dermot Shea said he was “not happy” with the tactics used in the arrest and the NYPD deferred prosecution with no fines and no bail. (NY1)

It’s hard to not see the connections of how the NYPD handled stop and frisk or fare evasions to social distancing. While Francisco Garcia was making his arrest of a black on an East Village street, there were NYPD officers photographed handing out masks to white people in parks who weren’t social distancing. (Lauren Evans for Jezebel)

Trevor Noah is paying the salaries of The Daily Show’s crew until production begins to ramp back up in the television industry. (Ishena Robinson for The Root)

Mayor Bill de Blasio is asserting an emergency power to ban all outdoor First Amendment activity even if people wear masks and follow distancing guidelines after Reclaim Pride tried to hold a press conference to protestSamaritan’s Purse in Central Park. They were told to disperse immediately under threat of arrest by the NYPD (Andy Humm for Gay City News)

New York City is launching a massive drive to distribute millions of masks to residents in the coming weeks to help New Yorkers comply with state mandates requiring residents to wear face coverings while in public. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Video: The Sakura Matsuri festival was canceled, but it doesn’t mean you can’t bring the cherry blossoms to you, although it will be considerably more difficult to do a TikTok with the trees this way. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

When will restaurants return? Strap in, because it may be a while. Restaurants are in phase three of the state’s reopening plan and arts and entertainment is in phase four. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Squibb Bridge is finally open, but also impossible to practice social distancing on. Another chapter in the bridge’s short, but troubled existence. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Here are NYC’s 2020 James Beard Awards finalists. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Briefly HQ has ordered a few meals that I’d describe as “fat meals” in the last few weeks. Here’s where to order healthy delivery in NYC. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Madeline for today’s featured photo!