The Briefly for September 20-21, 2020 – The “Don’t Call This A Staycation” Sunday Edition

Sunday’s NYC news digest: A potpourri of news, a RBG statue, City Hall’s annual report card, what we miss from pre-pandemic NYC, how to pack an emergency bag, and more

Today – Low: 52˚ High: 64˚
Clear throughout the day.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be honored with a statue in Brooklyn. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

NYC’s legal community reflects on RBG’s life and work. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

It feels insulting for for the city to push an advertising campaign that New Yorkers should “staycation” in New York City. Turns out when you remove the tourists from midtown, we still hate midtown. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The MTA has issued exactly zero summonses for mask non-compliance. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The anatomy of an NYC protest. Which role do you play? (Juliana Kim and Simbarashe Cha for NY Times)

New York City’s school reopening plans are still missing a key ingredient: enough teachers. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Parents and students react to the city’s constant waffling about the start of the school year. This feels like trying to read all of your summer reading in the weekend before school starts. (Sophia Chang, Gwynne Hogan, Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

The de Blasio administration released a 420-page document tracking City Hall operations for the last year. Murders are up. Juvenile arrests are up. Violent incidents in jails are up while population is down. The “excess death” rate” suggests the death toll from Covid-19 might be well over 50,000. NYPD response times are up. Response times for emergency complaints in NYCHA buildings is up. The homeless population increased. The good news? Rat complaints are down and there were new bike lanes built. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The report “Discipline in the NYPD 2019” outlines, but doesn’t detail, 339 cases in which officers faced departmental charges. Cops pleaded or were found guilty in 322 of those cases. Only 27 lost their jobs. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Murderinos: Look no further than your own backyard. The untold story of the Tompkins Square murder. (David Swanson for Village Voice from 1989)

Businesses around Yankee Stadium held a rally Thursday afternoon demanding that the city renegotiate the lease and tax deal that Yankee management worked out to stay in the Bronx under the Bloomberg administration, claiming that extra money obtained through the negotiation could help keep businesses surrounding the stadium stay afloat until fans are able to return to the stadium. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The 2020 fall foliage map. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

At the crossroads of art and commerce is the controversy at the Whitney, who canceled an exhibition of arresting responses to the pandemic and Black Lives Matter protests after artists of color criticized the Whitney for acquiring their work without consent and through discount sales. (Zachary Small for NY Times)

A look at how Governors Island could become a climate center for the city. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The mayor, possibly unaware that he is the mayor, made public comments about how outdoor dining “should become permanent.” Will he walk the walk or just talk the talk? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The pandemic tax? City Council voted in favor of giving restaurants the option to add a 10% charge to bills as an economic recovery support measure. The mayor supports the bill and once he signs it, it will be in effect immediately until indoor dining returns to full capacity. I guess the city’s response to us asking it to help restaurants is “help them yourself.” (Erika Adams for Eater)

If the last few years have seen the food world grapple with systemic issues like pay disparities, culinary credit, tipping, and harassment from either big-time chefs or everyday customers, the poorly regulated return of indoor dining — during a deadly pandemic, no less — feels like a middle finger to hospitality workers.
-Ryan Sutton, chief food critic for Eater, NYC’s Indoor Dining Comeback Fails Restaurant Workers. Here’s Why. for Eater

The city’s first store dedicated to Covid-19 essentials opened in Herald Square. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A new report from Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office found that 57 percent of dogs tested at city-run shelters developed respiratory disease during their stays, among other troubling findings. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD is working with the Trump administration to blame violent crime on bail reform by bringing federal charges instead of local charges against people suspected of involvement in shootings. The NYPD’s own data shows a lack of a link between bail reform and the increase in violent crime, but the truth has never stopped the NYPD of Trump administration before. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The mayor announced he will force his staff to take an unpaid one-week furlough between October 2020 and March 2021 to save money. It will save under a million dollars. The mayor is currently looking for a billion dollars of savings or will lay off 22,000 city employees. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Wanna buy a T. rex skeleton? Stan, the T. rex, is up for auction on October 6 at Christie’s. (Zachary Smalls for NY Times)

Photos: Sunnyside has become the home of fairies. No, really. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Where to eat outside in Prospect Heights. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

A love letter to the 1993 Super Mario Bros movie, a movie about two brothers from Brooklyn. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

Indoor pools will be able to open on September 30 at 33% capacity. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Apartment Porn: A $16.5 million Upper East Side townhouse with a miniature pool and a roof garden. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

More than 170 New York City transit workers have been harassed or assaulted for asking passengers to wear masks. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

38 glorious Chinese restaurants open right now. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It’s not uncommon to see people sitting outside libraries in an attempt to use the free wifi. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Columbia’s marching band disbanded itself for “a history riddled with offensive behavior.” (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

Bankruptcy will not stop New York Sports Clubs from charging you your monthly fee. The state attorney general’s office is investigating. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Trick or treating is nor canceled this year, ensuring the scariest Halloween of all time. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There will be no snow days at all this year, as classes will move to remote learning in case of snow. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

Dante in Greenwich Village, voted world’s best bar by Time Out) is now offering canned cocktails. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

In praise of Gloria’s Caribbean, a Crown Heights mainstay. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s real estate market has been hotter than Manhattan’s, pre- and post-pandemic. (Kael Goodman for amNewYork Metro)

Time Out looks back to the 10 things we miss the most about the Before Times in NYC. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: “Doggy Bags” brings giant dog sculptures to the Garment District. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

How to pack an emergency bag. Just in case. (A. C. Shilton for NY Times)

NYC’s most anticipated restaurants openings of fall 2020. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Briefly for May 12, 2020 – The “Everyone Except Staten Island is Doing It” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Alt-side parking returns for a week, Frank Constanza’s house, jealous of the Finger Lakes, MoMA’s new online exhibit, a dessert delivery guide, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 56˚
Clear throughout the day.

While I was watching the mayor’s press conferences, it hit me just how ugly NYC’s flags are. (Jeff Coltin for City and State New York)

Quickly, what are the names of the two NYPL lions? Patience and Fortitude. I can’t beleive you forgot their names on their 109th birthday. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Mayor de Blasio is a unifier. With one tweet, tenants and renters both unified in their hatred of him. (Erik Engquist for The Real Deal)

RIP Jerry Stiller. Did you know you can go see Frank Constanza’s house in Queens? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

District attorneys in every borough but Staten Island have pledged not to prosecute those arrested for social distancing offenses, and in some cases, other violations stemming from recent emergency measures. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Alt-side parking is coming back for one week so the Sanitation Department can perform a “clean sweep” of the streets. Alt-side parking is back from May 18-25. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Jacques Torres’s Soho flagship store is closing for good. His other locations and Sunset Park manufacturing facility are staying open. (Serena Dai for Eater)

A Queens couple, Paulo Pinho and Clelia Pinho, allegedly attacked a group of Hasidic men on Sunday, supposedly over social distancing. I think they missed the point if they ripped the masks off the men’s’ faces while punching them. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

If everything goes according to plan and the city doesn’t become Michigan or Florida, there’s a chance we can start to reopen in June. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city’s largest provider of shelter and support services for homeless mothers and their children announced a new housing stability and recovery plan, “The Aftermath Plan: Responding to Homelessness in the Wake of COVID-19.” 25% of working mothers in shelters have recently lost their jobs. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Portions of upstate are reopening on Friday. Feeling jealous of the Finger Lakes region? (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

Congrats everyone, we are subsidizing a 90% empty NYC Ferry system! In all of April, there were 19,851 riders on the ferry. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

No one was ready for snow and hail in mid-May. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A bill is working its way through the state’s legislature that will allow businesses to refuse entry to people who have a temperature of 100.4 or above. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

Are your neighbors noisy assholes? Here’s some advice on how to do your best to soundproof your apartment. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

Now available from the MoMA is MoMA Through Time, which is an incomplete history of MoMA and MoMA PS1, as told through objects in the archives. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The CDC’s data points to an additional 5,923 deaths in New York City that are not in the confirmed or probable coronavirus death count, starting from March 11. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The best and worst grocery store Mexican food, according to Eater’s food critics. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

“Can’t wait to write a tell all about my experience during my last two trimesters dealing with the incompetent doctors at Montefiore.” –Amber Isaac tweeted about her care at Montefiore a few days before she died, pregnant in the hospital. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

Between the Windows is an art project you can see while walking Manhattan Avenue in Greenpoint, from Vanessa Albury. The first three-week residency features work from David B. Smith. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Moving companies are still at it during quarantine. Not as many people are moving, but it’s still necessary for people leaving the city or for the time-honored New York sport of “there’s gotta be a better place to live than this neighborhood.” (Hoa P Nguyen for Bedford + Bowery)

Remember gyms? Here’s what gyms of New York’s future may look like. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The Vourderis family owns and operates Wonder Wheel park, and while bracing for a devastating summer in Coney Island, they are spending their time volunteering. The family has been making 3D printed face shields for first responders using printers that were purchased to make back-up parts for the amusement park rides. “You can’t knock New York City down. You can beat it up a little bit, but it’s always gonna come back.” -Deno Vourderis. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The state Supreme Court’s Appellate Division has rejected a lawsuit that sought to stop the erection of a pedestrian and bicycle bridge over Clara Coffey Park. The bridge will connect Sutton Place South to the East River Esplanade, spanning FDR Drive. (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

The NYC dessert delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for April 3, 2020 – The “A Bad Omen Washes Ashore at Jacob Riis Park” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Javits Center opens to COVID-19 patients, a takeout and delivery guide, 369,000 New Yorkers file for unemployment, Tekashi69 goes free, and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 53˚
Possible drizzle until evening.
This weekend – Low: 46˚ High: 57˚

The Governor Cuomo’s nipple piercing mystery may be solved? But also the mystery rages on. (Hudon Hongo for Gizmodo)

No matter who you are, if you’re sick or not, it’s time to wear a mask, a bandana, a balaclava, a Spider-Man mask, just cover your face with something if you go out in public. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A 28-foot-long humpback whale washed ashore Tuesday at Jacob Riis Park in Queens. If everything hadn’t already gone to hell, this might be a bad omen. (Maya Kaufman for Patch)

Just as the coronavirus season is expected to end, this year’s hurricane season is expected to be 40% more active than the average season. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Photos: Inside the USNS Comfort. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Javits Center now has 2,500 beds, up from 1,000, and has been approved for COVID-19 patients. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

What happens if we run out of ventilators? While Governor Cuomo says “there’s no protocol,” there’s a 266-page document from 2015 available for download on the state’s website that lays it out step by step. Basically, it boils down to saving the most lives. (Gwynne Hogan and Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Craving NYC without going outside? Here’s an exhaustive list of movies featuring Greenwich Village. (Ariel Kates for GVSHP)

The history of the Brooklyn Blackout cake. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

I linked to the wrong story yesterday giving hard numbers on COVID-19 infections by zip code, here’s a better breakdown of how many are sick per zip code in NYC. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Michelin-starred Eleven Madison Park is turning into a kitchen for Rethink Food, a city-based food nonprofit, thanks to “an undisclosed amount of funding” from American Express. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Rethink Food NYC is offering 30 restaurants $40,000 each to stay open and provide 24,000 meals per day for New Yorkers in need. Eleven Madison Park is not on the list. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

“Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds,” but also the postal service has been struggling to deliver the mail with some areas not receiving mail for days at a time due to a severe staffing shortage. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Maybe the last place you want to hang out in during a global pandemic that’s infected over a million people, but the longer the state is on PAUSE, the more outdoor space becomes a luxury. The case for Green-Wood Cemetery. (Nathan Kensinger for Curbed)

Photos: Sakura Park in the Bronx’s cherry blossoms are hitting their peak. It’s been so warm that the cherry blossoms across the city have been blooming. Time to steal a peek if you can find one. (HARLEM + BESPOKE)

A map of who’s open in Western Queens, with over 250 businesses that are open. (Michael Dorgan for Sunnyside Post)

A federal judge ordered Gaspar Avendano-Hernandez released from ICE’s custody. You might remember his arrest because Erick Diaz-Cruz his girlfriend’s son was shot in the face by an ICE officer while he was being arrested. Tragically, Diaz-Cruz did not survive. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re among the 369,000 New Yorkers who lost a job in the last week, you know all too well that attempting to apply for benefits is a full-time job in itself. (Daniel Moritz-Rabson for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo’s daily chats with New York and the nation are getting weird. He dedicated some of Thursday’s press conference to a chat with his brother, who is in quarantine after a COVID-19 diagnosis earlier in the week. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

Maps: New York City is so big (how big is it?) that you can fit the population of multiple cities inside each borough. Brooklyn? Chicago. Staten Island? Sacramento. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Quarantee is like a nightclub, except it all happens on Zoom. You’re charged a cover and somehow “bouncers” enforce a dress code and they even offer “private tables.” I’m at a loss for words. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Anyone else notice lots of masks and rubber gloves littering the streets? (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me for Asking)

It depends on who you believe, but the staff of Montefiore Medical Center may or may not have been given Yankees rain ponchos as personal protective gear for their shifts. (Brian M. Rosenthal and James Wagner for NY Times)

One of the inmates that was released to prevent further COVID-19 outbreaks in the city’s federal prisons? Tekashi69. (Melena Ryzik and Nancy Coleman for NY Times)

A federal judge struck down a portion of the state’s new rent laws that dealt with retroactive rent overcharge claims. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Video: “Typologies of New York City: A Crowdsourced Hyperlapse” 1,246 photos of NY to make one great video. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Do the animals in the Bronx Zoo know something has changed? (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Traffic to the city’s domestic violence website is up 7.8x for the first full week following the state’s declaration of PAUSE. There has been no increase in domestic violence calls to 911, which could mean domestic violence could be going unreported. Call 911 in an emergency, otherwise, the Domestic Violence hotline’s phone number is 1-800-621-4673 (HOPE). (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Mount Sinai researchers are tracking COVID-19 across New York City through a program called STOP COVID NYC. If you have any symptoms, you can participate and help track and predict smaller outbreaks. (Norwood News)

The happy haunts of Green-Wood Cemetery are open to the public for longer in new, expanded hours. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

Mayor Bill de Blasio greeted EMT and paramedics from across the country at Fort Totten Park Thursday morning as they prepared to help New York City’s overburdened emergency medical workers. (Alejandra ‘Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Residential and commercial real estate showings are considered “essential,” but showings can’t happen in person. Are you ready to buy an apartment based on a FaceTime call? (Sylvia Varnham O’Regan and E.B. Solomont for The Real Deal)

How the 2021 mayoral candidates have responded to the coronavirus. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Takeout and delivery options for every situation. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, Arden Shore, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)