The Briefly for March 2, 2020 – The “Yes, We Are All Out of Hand Sanitizer” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news edition: NY and NYC get approval for coronavirus testing, the Islanders are leaving Brooklyn, the East Village’s best restaurants, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 57˚
Possible drizzle overnight.

The MTA will shut down the F train on nights and weekends beginning on March 21 through next year to install and upgrade the line’s signals between Church and Stillwell Ave. Who on planet earth decided it was a good idea that one of the trains that beings people to Coney Island should be out of commission for the entire summer? (Irina Groushevaia for Bklyner)

February 2020 was the second-smallest snow on record in New York City since records began in 1868. Technically it snowed the smallest bit on Saturday, Leap Day. In all of winter so far, we’ve had 4.8″ total, compares to 61.9″ nine years ago. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio’s plan to convert basement apartments into legal apartments is hitting one significant problem: reality. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

The state has confirmed its first Coronavirus (COVID-19) case, and it’s in Manhattan. The woman in her late 30s who contracted the virus had traveled to Iran and is now isolated in her home. People who had close contact with the patient have already been identified. The New York Health Commissioner, Dr. Oxiris Barbot, has called the spread to other New Yorkers from this woman “low risk.” (Joseph Goldstein and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The city and state both received approvals for testing the Coronavirus, previously the city had been sending potentially contaminated samples via FexEd to the CDC in Atlanta. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Looking for hand sanitizer only to find out that it’s sold out? You’re not alone. Also, washing your hands for 20 seconds will prevent the spread of disease better than hand sanitizer. (Julie Creswell for NY Times)

For the COVID-19 paranoid person in your life: The Wuhan Virus: How to Stay Safe. (Laurie Garret, a Pulitzer Prize winning science writer, for Foreign Policy)

There are five works by Isamu Noguchi on display in New York City outside of the Noguchi Museum in Long Island City. Once of those pieces, an installation in the lobby of 666 Fifth Avenue, is in danger of being disassembled thanks to a pending renovation by the building’s new owners. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Staten Island’s City Councilmember Joe Borelli doesn’t like speed camera tickets or the Reckless Driver Accountability Act, he should know because he’s earned himself five tickets issued by speed cameras. 22 pedestrians have been killed by drivers in 2020. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Miss Staten Island Madison L’Insalata came out as bisexual and was promptly banned from marching in last weekend’s Staten Island St Patrick’s Day parade. Another pageant winner who showed support for her was also banned. Congrats Staten Island, you’re the worst. (CBS News)

Photos: Over at the Queens “St. Pat’s for All” Parade, the mayor, Speaker Corey Johnson Senator Chuck Schumer, AOC, and other federal and local officials marched and partied. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The former president of the Stonewall Democratic Club is eyeing a seat on the City Council in Queens. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

10 surprising places to discover on Queens Blvd. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Video: How many of the places can you see in this video of the East Village in the 1960s are still there today? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Most of the city’s remaining public phone booths will be removed. Not on the list for removal are the phone booths which offers free calls on West End and 66th, 90th, and 100th Streets. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Yes, plastic bags are banned in NYC, but the Department of Environmental Conservation is delaying enforcement of the ban until April 1. (Marie J. French for Politico)

Back in October, Andy Byford submitted a letter of resignation to the MTA that he would later retract, only to quit again at the beginning of the year. Freedom of Information Law requests have been filed to reveal the letters and the MTA claims to “not have it is its possession.” (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

If you graduated high school in New York, you know the stress of the Regents exams. All that may change. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

The Department of Education released a new recommended reading catalog that represents a wider range of diversity to the authors and book subjects. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

It took drivers less than 24 hours to destroy the city-installed bike and “protection” on 13th St. An example of how plastic barriers are useless. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

An investigator with the Office of Special Narcotics Prosecutor, Stephen Abreu, punched a bouncer in the face and fired two gunshots inside the bar because his drunken attempts to flirt with women were failures, according to first-hand accounts and a police report. Stephen Abreu was suspended from work, arrested and charged with felony attempted murder, reckless endangerment, attempted assault, menacing, and more. For some reason, he was released without bail when his charges qualify for bail. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Say farewell to Islanders games at the Barclays Center. They’ll finally be returning to Long Island. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

New York is the most tax burdened in the country according to a new analysis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

28 restaurants that define the East Village. (Stefanie Tuder for Eater)

The Briefly for February 7, 2020 – The Weekend “Who Are We Saving Our City From?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The State of the City, the 14 best brunch spots, the people trying to talk to strangers on the subway, another failure for the Mets, and more

Today – Low: 28˚ High: 57˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 31˚ High: 44˚

The Department of Homeland Security is blocking New Yorkers from enrolling in the Trusted Traveler Programs, including Global Entry, in a petty and spiteful move but he president to attempt to punish New York. At the center of it all is the state’s Green Light Law, which allows undocumented immigrants to get driver’s licenses. (Azi Paybarah for NY Times)

“This is unbounded arrogance, disrespect of the rule of law, hyper-political government, and this is another form of extortion” -Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo (Jesse McKinley, Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Annie Correal for NY Times)

Watch the full State of the City address. (NYC Mayor’s Office)

The mayor’s seventh State of the City address focused on helping small businesses, overhauling his affordable housing plan, boosting high school graduation rates and investing in green energy. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Our idiot mayor’s theme for his speech was “Save Our City.” Listen jackass, who are you saving it from? You’ve been in charge for six years now, you are the person this city needs to be saved from. He claims to be energized from his abject failure of a presidential run, which no one wanted him to do in the first place. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

The mayor’s goal of creating 300,000 units of affordable housing may not be possible with neighborhoods pushing back against the city’s attempted rezonings. With the de Blasio administration seeing rezonings of wealthy neighborhoods as politically impossible, the burden unfairly falls on lower-income or minority neighborhoods. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

After a decade of disenfranchising development that displaces different neighborhoods’ denizens, lower-income and minority communities feel it’s necessary to fight back. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

Does Vision Zero need saving? The mayor unveiled “Vision Zero Unit”, 100 NYPD officers tasked with patrolling hot spots where pedestrians and cyclists have been killed. There are very few people that believe a new NYPD unit, rather than better training, will make a difference. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Are you thinking about popping the question next week? The 10 best places in NYC to propose. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)

Take a look up on Saturday night and you’ll find a super snow moon. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Subway riders beware: The Subway Social Club is trying to make the subways “friendlier” by talking to strangers on the train. An admirable goal, but please oh god don’t talk to me on the subway. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Bar cars, a place for socializing, on MetroNorth and the LIRR are a thing of the past. A look back at the tiki bar car on MetroNorth. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

So broker’s fees are gone for apartment rentals, here’s what it means. There are still situations where a broker’s fee will apply, it all depends who hires the broker. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Have you bought a lottery ticket in Long Island City or at Nonna’s Kitchen & Deli in the Bronx? The state lottery is waiting for you to pick up your $1 million prize. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

How to donate or dispose of furniture in the city. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

An ICE officer shot someone while on duty at a private residence in Brooklyn. Why do ICE agents have guns? (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

All twelve members of the New York City Council’s women’s caucus are calling for the resignation of Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance over his perceived mishandling of a multiple high-profile sexual assault cases, including Harvey Weinstein, Jeffrey Epstein, and Robert Hadden, the gynecologist who abused women during gynecological exams. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The newest Food Bazaar in the Bronx, at 83,000 square feet, is absolutely massive and the biggest supermarket in the borough. (Ed García Conde for Welome2TheBronx)

The 31 best dive bars in the city. (Luke Fortney and Erika Adams for Eater)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is offering a new “Unhung Heroes of the Metropolitan” tour, which highlights the tiny dicks that can be found in the museum’s art collection. Tickets are available for the nice price of $69 for adults. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A court upheld the ruling that fantasy sports websites like DraftKings and FanDuel are illegal gambling sites and a 2016 law that allowed the websites violated state law. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Who doesn’t love telling other New Yorkers what to do? The Brooklyn Public Library is looking for votes for the “North Brooklyn Reads” poll. (Greenpointers)

Photos: The mural in Brooklyn paying tribute to Gigi and Kobe Bryant. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Fred Wilpon destroyed the Mets’ ability to sell the team with his insistence that continue to be involved in the team. It it wasn’t for James Dolan, Fred Wilpon would be the dirt worst owner of anything in New York. (Jenna West for Sports Illustrated)

LaLou, Portale, and Kindred have been added to Eater’s 14 hottest brunch restaurants in the city. (Stefanie Tuder for Eater)

The Briefly for December 20, 2019 – The “Do You Know About the Secret Pet Tree?” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Inwood rezoning is killed in court, New York state’s $6 billion deficit, the city moves to kill its relationship with the Trump Organization, and more

Today – Low: 23˚ High: 33˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 27˚ High: 42˚

This weekend’s subway disruptions hit the 1, 3, 6, A, E, F, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The story of the two menorahs claiming to be the world’s largest and why there can’t ever be a bigger menorah. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

13 places to find festive holiday decorations in the city. Do you know where to find the secret pet tree in Central Park? (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Landlords are blaming the new rent laws on why they’re cutting back on apartment renovations. Or maybe it’s because landlords are always cutting back on apartment renovations? (The Real Deal)

The fourth annual Kwanzaa crawl is happening on the 26th with stops in Harlem and Brooklyn to celebrate the city’s black-owned restaurants and bars. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Will less garbage cans in Prospect Park lead to people carrying their garbage out of the park? The Prospect Park Alliance will be trying a “carry-in, carry-out” policy modeled after the National Parks Service policy. (Colin Mixson for Brooklyn Paper)

The MTA tried a similar program for five years where garbage cans were removed form stations and riders were encouraged to carry their garbage out with them. It ended because the amount of track fires caused by trash doubled after the program was implemented. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

The MTA unveiled 68 subway stations that will be getting elevator upgrades as part of their 2020-2024 capital plan. Among the 68 are Broadway Junction, Woodhaven Boulevard, and Van Cortlandt Park-242 St. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

There are over 100 subway stations across the city where one or more entrance is “temporarily” closed, some since the 70s or 80s. Maybe it’s time to reopen some of these entrances? (Canaan Geberer for Brooklyn Eagle)

After a nine month renovation, the Astoria Boulevard stop on the N/W line reopened on Wednesday, but construction will continue as workers instal elevators, staircases, walkways, and more. (NY1)

Turns out Christmas is predicted to be warmer than average this year and more importantly, no snow. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

We will all wake up on January 1, 2020 sharing the state’s fresh $6 billion deficit. (Ross Barkan for Gothamist)

14 historic sites of the abolitionist movement in Greenwich Village. (Andrew Berman for 6sqft)

Video: Meet Hannah Gavios, who completed the 2019 New York City Marathon on a pair of crutches. (Great Big Story)

Governors Ball wants to move to Van Cortlandt Park the Bronx. (Ese Olumhense for The City)

Where to eat with a really big group. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Queens man impeached. (Victoria Merlino for Queens Eagle)

RIP Felix Rohatyn, “Felix the Fixer,” the man who saved NYC from financial collapse in 1975. (Bruce Nelan for Washington Post)

For a brief period of time on Thursday you could come across impeachment-themed postcards in the Trump Tower gift shop thanks to comedians Davram Steifler and Jason Selvig. They’ve done it in the past too, with Russian flags, Putin postcards, and KKK hoods. (Lee Moran for HuffPost)

For the second year in a row we are ending the year with less chain stores in the city than we started. The city overall is down 304 chains. (Kevin Sun for The Real Deal)

Terra cotta building facades have a history of disrepair and danger, from the death of Grace Gold in 1979 to this week’s death of Erica Tishman. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo’s Mother Cabrini statue has found a home in Battery Park City’s South Cove. The patron saint of immigrants will be across the harbor from the Statue of Liberty. (John Alexander for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Meet Athena Soules: The artist and co-founder of NYC Light Brigade, whose signs are shaping the image of New York’s resistance movement. (Paul Frangipane for Brooklyn Eagle)

The City Council appears to be ready to flush the Trump Organization, targeting city contracts with the Trump Organization at the skating rinks in Central Park and the Trump Golf Links in the Bronx. Both locations are underperforming and losing funds for city parks. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The Heartland Brewery is on its last legs. Down to three locations, one in the Empire State Building and two in Times Square, the Empire State Building location is set to close next month with rumors of the last two locations closing following suit in 2020. (Erika Adams for Grub Street)

We better start getting used to seeing humpback whales in city waters, because they’re hanging out even in winter. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

One day people will look back at the 2019 trend of erecting plastic “igloos” outside in winter and laugh. We’re not there yet. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

It’s in violation of the city’s paid sick law to require employees to find replacements when calling out sick, but that didn’t stop Starbucks from doing that for years. A settlement with the city is forcing Starbucks to pay $150,000 in restitution. (Kate Offenhartz for Gothamist)

How Jona Rechnitz, “a liar and a felon,” became a star witness after being arrested on corruption charges. (Jan Ramson for NY Times)

The Department of Transportation is hiring seven “apprentice highway and sewer inspectors” to inspect bike lanes and review road work done by contractors. Bike team, assemble! (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

A look back at Mayor Bill de Blasio’s 2019, a year spent trying to convince everyone they were wrong when they said no one wanted him to run for president and eventually he learned the truth and kept pushing until he had no money left and came home. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The City Council and the mayor blew their own self-imposed deadline of the end of the year to reform the city’s property tax system. That’s politician-speak for “broken promise.” (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

Speaking of blown self-imposed deadlines, it looks like the NYPD won’t actually be encrypting their radios in 2020. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork)

A judge nullified Inwoods rezoning, finding that the de Blasio administration “failed to take a hard look” at how the land use changes will impact the neighborhood. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Only two out of 28 yeshivas investigated by the city’s Department of Education were deemed to be providing an education “substantially equivalent“ to that given at secular public schools, according to the city’s report on the long-delayed investigation into failing yeshivas. (Madina Touré for Politico)

A straightforward guide to holiday tipping. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best new restaurants of 2019. (The Infatuation)