The Briefly for February 12, 2019 – The “Sometimes You Need To Look at Photos of Dogs” Edition

Congestion pricing and legal recreational marijuana get real, the mayor won’t act on parking placard abuse, but the City Council will, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you haven’t gone outside yet, today’s weather is going to be miserable. (Patch)

Take a look inside Seth Meyers’ apartment. (Curbed)

The story behind the Harriet Tubman Memorial “Swing Low” on 122nd Street. (6sqft)

Photos from The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. You know you can’t resist. (Gothamist)

It’s 0.0000797113 of an acre on the corner of Seventh Ave and Christopher Street and if you don’t look down at the right moment you’ll miss a significant piece of defiant private property that defines the spirit of the Village. (NY Times)

There is a 2017 city law that dictates that all entrances used by pedestrians must have visible numbers. Over 53% of buildings on 42nd Street are missing numbers. City Councilmember Jumaane Williams introduced the law and is tired of selective enforcement. (amNY)

The five oldest buildings in Manhattan. (Untapped Cities)

Mayor Bill de Blasio’s public school report that addresses segregation in education is released. Now that his crutch of talking about how the report is coming has been removed, the mayor has to actually do something, which is not his strong suit. (NY Times)

New York will likely lose a seat in the House of Representatives in 2020, and New York Democrats could redraw Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’ district to remove her from Congress. If AOC is asked to leave with such a large national profile, she could target Chuck Schumer’s senate seat in 2022. (The Intercept)

Getting a tattoo in a subway car? Unless you love staph infections, it’s not a great idea. Maybe that’s why TuffCity Tattoo created a replica car. (Untapped Cities)

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, the New York Public Library has released an interactive map of fictional love in the city. (6sqft)

CatVideoFest is shockingly not happening in Williamsburg or Bushwick. (Brooklyn Paper)

Governor Cuomo’s transportation deputy unveiled their latest proposal for congestion pricing. Implementation would go into effect in 2021 and any vehicle going into the “central business district” in Manhattan would be charged roughly $11.52, no matter where you enter. There will be no business exemption and the funds will be put into a “lockbox” for the MTA. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

McNally Jackson is staying in SoHo. They’re not moving, but they’re opening two new stores in City Point in Brooklyn and the South Street Seaport. (The Real Deal)

Upstate says they’ll take Amazon HQ2 if we don’t want it. Maybe the Syracuse-Rochester corridor forgets that Amazon has to want to be there. (NY Post)

“We have reminded the folks there that we are still here” New Jersey also would take HQ2, but Governor Phil Murphy said it in the saddest way possible. (NY Post)

Ruben Diaz Sr, noted homophobe and city council member, says that he is the victim in this story. (Patch)

Curbed is hiring a full-time, junior-level reporter. (Curbed)

Kings Plaza Shopping Center, the site of the large fire that injured over 20 people in September of last year, continues to receive fines for illegally storing cars. Their latest fine could be $25,000, their second in the last six months. (Brooklyn Paper)

You haven’t missed the news. The jury in the El Chapo trial are still deliberating. (NY Post)

Here are the city’s 20 most dangerous one-lane intersections for pedestrians and cyclists. (Localize.city)

The L train mystery odor is one week old and it has two new siblings. Joining the party is a thick fog and the smell of rubbing alcohol. The smell appears to be permeating the subways into nearby apartments. (Gothamist)

The City Council unveiled multiple bills that would mandate proactive enforcement and increase oversight of parking placard abuse. One bill would ban city vehicles from blocking crosswalks, fire hydrants, sidewalks, bike lanes and bus lanes unless there is an emergency. It’s maddening that this is currently legal. (Patch)

According to the state budget: Recreational marijuana will come with three taxes. $1 per dry weight gram of flower and $0.25 per gram of trim, 20% sales tax and a 2% local sales tax. You would be able to grow and process up to six plants on private property, using it would be illegal except for private property and can’t take it across state lines. (amNY)

A gym teacher in Brooklyn was fired for playing Fortnite with his students. (NY Post)

HUD administrator Lynne Patton’s stunt of living in different NYCHA buildings for the next four weeks has already been proven to be a farce. (NY Post)

The mayor is so sure that he’s such done a great job that he’s headed to New Hampshire to continue flirting with running for president. (NY Post)

Where to eat near Grand Central.

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The Briefly for January 14, 2019 – The “Watch the Skies for the Brown Plague” Edition

Amazon HQ2 is the city’s new ATM, Chinatown Fair gets the NY Times treatment, Cuomo wants to ban plastic bags, roll your eyes at Janeane Garofalo, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s overnight subway changes are minimal, but will still hit hard if you need the 7 between Queens and Manhattan or one of the other 6 lines with changes. (Subway Changes)

Janeane Garofalo: 2019’s Chris Crocker. (BrooklynVegan)

How will Mayor de Blasio pay for his $100 million health care expansion? The city and state’s latest theoretical ATM, Amazon HQ2. (NY Post)

Who is responsible for the L train shutdown fiasco? Anyone and everyone. (NY Times)

If you had to choose a coffin shaped like one NYC landmark, which would you choose? (Untapped Cities)

“You hear ‘splat’ and then you get the brown plague.” Don’t throw your dirty diapers out your apartment windows. (NY Post)

It’s a public art installation and it’s also a depressing statement about our impact on the environment. “Iceberg” is on Broadway between W37th and W 38th. (6sqft)

The 20 best happy hours in the city. (Thrillist)

The 167th St B/D station is open, including the glass mosaic “Beacons,” by artist Rico Gatson, showing off portraits of former residents of the neighborhood like Celia Cruz, Sonia Sotomayor, and Maya Angelou. (MTA)

This $45 million apartment might seem expensive, but that was after $70 million of discounts! (6sqft)

The MTA has no problem with subway ads for boner pills, so what’s the deal with Dame Products’ ad ban? Hard to not see this as sexist garbage. (Bedford + Bowery)

The City Council’s new bill that mandates all city school buses be equipped with GPS devices that will give parents real-time information on where their children are at any given moment via an app. During November’s snow storm, some special education children were stuck on a bus for over 10 hours. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Staten Islanders are upset that MTV’s “Made In Staten Island” makes them look like a “cesspool of gangsters and meatheads.” Draw your own conclusions. (Gothamist)

Not all heroes wear capes. Some, like Taylor Mali and his Snatchelator, are just dads from Carroll Gardens who are fed up with plastic bags in trees. (Pardon Me for Asking)

Forget Oreo Squirrel, long live Water Fountain Pigeon!

The Highline Ballroom will close in February after 12 years. (Time Out)

Crown Height’s fake bullet hole bar, Summerhill BK, is closed and is planning a re-brand. (Eater)

The greatest race made for-idiots/by-idiots, the Idiotarod, is scheduled for January 26. Mark your calendars, idiots. (Gothamist)

It takes seven and a half minutes for emergency responders to arrive if you have a heart attack in Manhattan, thanks to a shortage of FDNY paramedics and EMTs. Jersey City’s mayor has an Uber-style solution to cut that time down dramatically. (NY Post)

What makes New York pizza superior to Detroit pizza, Rhode Island pizza, or Chicago pizza? Is it the water? (StreetEasy)

It’s the responsibility of individuals, and not the city, to shovel the sidewalks. Here’s why that’s wrong. (CityLab)

After nearly 50 years, Souen in Soho is closing. (Eater)

A new study shows that NY schools are not safe for LGBTQ children. The Gay and Lesbian Straight Education Network’s study shows that students lack an inclusive curriculum, protective policies and 90% of LGBTQ students face discrimination. (NY Post)

The mayor is not ruling out a run at the presidency. (Politico)

Get ready to kiss plastic bags goodbye. (NY Post)

Chinatown Fair has defied the odds since the 1940s and stands as Manhattan’s last original video arcade. (NY Times)

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The Briefly for November 30, 2018 – The “Joyless, Arbitrary, Spiritually Empty” Edition

The weekend subway changes, rezoning North Brooklyn, Mrs. Maisel’s Greenwich Village, the snootiest area of the city, the subway station with the most crime, and more in todays daily NYC news digest.

The weekend’s subway nightmares, explained. (SubwayStats)

Take your pick: a dog film festival, a cat film festival, or a horse film festival. They’re all this weekend. (NY Times)

Amazon’s 4 Star store in SoHo: “among my most dismal shopping experiences in recent memory: joyless, arbitrary, spiritually empty.”

The Gowanus Canal is partially clean for the first time in 150 years. Can it ever be truly clean? (Curbed)

Citi Bike will triple the number of bikes in the next five years as a result of the city allowing its parent company, Motivate, to be bought by Lyft for $100 million. (amNY)

Take a tour of Anable Basin, the future home of Amazon’s HQ2. (Curbed)

If you’ve noticed businesses taking down awnings and replacing them with signs, you’re not alone. Is it a conspiracy? The Department of Buildings has started enforcing old laws that placed limits on letter size and awning size with fines that start at $4,000. City Council members have floated a theory that an awning company has called in complaints to drum up business. (Bklyner)

Mic, who occupied two stories of World Trade Center One, laid off most of its staff and is in talks to sell to Bustle. (Gothamist)

10 secrets of the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree. (Untapped Cities)

Four days of the new “modern” signals on the 7, four days of significant delays, and that was only a small part of what made Thursday’s commute awful. (Gothamist)

While likely not a surprise, Comptroller Scott Stringer released a report that argues the city doesn’t do enough for the city’s neediest families, despite Mayor de Blasio’s affordable housing agenda. (Curbed)

Atlantic Ave-Barclays Center has the distinction of having the most reported crimes of any subway stop in the city, with the Port Authority coming in second. Here are the 25 subway stations with the highest numbers of crime. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Hanukkah approaches, plan properly. (amNY)

A tour of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’s Greenwich Village. (GVSHP)

Life isn’t difficult enough for cyclists in the city before some nut job starts tossing thumbtacks into Sunnyside’s protected bike lanes. (Sunnyside Post)

What’s the snootiest area in the city? Before you click, try to guess. (StreetEasy)

A portion of LaGuardia’s new Terminal B opened on Thursday, including a fool hall, retail, and also some gates for airplanes to come and go from. Amazon Cuomo was there to cut the ribbon. (6sqft)

The NYPD is getting a new handbook on how to treat victims of crime. According to Commissioner James O’Neill, it’s about “simple human interaction.” (NY Post)

Irate Winterfest attendees are receiving refunds after attending the underwhelming first few days of the event in the Brooklyn Museum’s backyard. The Brooklyn Museum has been quick to point out that the event is being run by an outside company. (Bklyner)

Do opponents have any hope of stopping Amazon in Long Island City? (Gothamist)

A 125th St Whole Foods security guard choked a man unconscious. Turns out they take it seriously when you intentionally mislabel bulk goods. (NY Post)

RIP Bleecker Bob, owner of the appropriately titled Bleecker Bob’s. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

For 20 years, “Santa’s Corner” in Whitestone has been the epitome of “there’s no such thing as too many Christmas light on one house.” (TimesLedger)

The New York State Pavilion in Queens is receiving a $16 million federal grant from FEMA to repair damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. (TimesLedger)

Can a rezoning of parts of Bushwick, Greenpoint, and Williamsburg save North Brooklyn from itself? (Brooklyn Paper)

Unsolicited dick pics being sent over AirDrop on iPhones is a problem and a new City Council bill could make it punishable by a $1,000 and a year in jail. (NY Times)

Kyle Borello, 31, was arrested for riot and attempted assault charges for last month’s Upper East Side fight involving The Proud Boys, a SPLC designated hate group and FBI classified extremist group with white nationalist ties. (NY Post)

13 of the hottest new cocktail bars. (Eater)

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