The Briefly for March 6, 2020 – The “Silliest Restaurant in New York is Now Closed” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD is accused of fudgung numbers to sink bail reform, the last on coronavirus / COVID-19 in NYC, the 26th annual Armory Show and Spring.Break, and more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 50˚
Light rain in the afternoon and evening.
This weekend – Low: 33˚ High: 57˚

Now that tote bags have becomes the necessary accessory in the city, here are 10 reusable bags you need. (Mary Lane for New York Cliche)

If you were to remove all of the non-accessible subway stops from the map, you’d end up with a pathetic looking subway map. (Clarissa Diaz for Gothamist)

If you had “go to that ridiculous restaurant where the staff pretends they’re ninjas,” here is some bad news. Ninja is closed after 15 silly years. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The hottest Manhattan restaurants for March 2020. (Stefanie Tuder, Serena Dai, Luke Fortney, and Erika Adams for Eater)

A partnership with the Public Art Fund brings permanent art installations to Terminal B as part of its $8 billion transformation. The artists bringing their work to LaGuardia are Jeppe Hein, Sabine Hornig, Laura Owens and Sarah Sze. (Hilarie M. Sheets for NY Times)

Photos: Lots of art shows have the potential to be staid, Spring/Break does not appear to be one of those shows. Also: Inside the 26th annual Armory Show at Pier 94 and Pier 90, the largest art fair happening this week.(Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Dough Doughnuts will expand to Rockefeller Center this May. (Grant Lancaster for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA is installing over 100 cameras in four subway stations in Forest Hills and Rego Park in an attempt to help the NYPD deter crime in the area. The plan is in reaction to the man who was shot in the leg at the 75th Avenue subway station last March. (Max Parrott for QNS)

We’re living in a bean boom time, and this isn’t referring to the dried beans that are flying from the shelves from grocery stores across the city. Beans, they’re good for your heart, and you have a chance to eat them more in the city. Here are the restaurants where you can experience the bean boom for yourself. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Will a new soccer stadium in the Bronx, only a few blocks from Yankee Stadium, actually help the neighborhood? The Urban Land Institute New York and Bronx Community Board 4 have released a report outlining how a new stadium could best impact the community. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

Happy 10th anniversary to Paulie Gee’s. (Greenpointers)

Rapist Harvey Weinstein will finally be headed to rot in jail on Rikers Island after a heart procedure. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

Video: The NYPD violently arrests a Black man suspected of smoking weed in a park in Canarsie, a grim reminder of how the law and its enforcement are often on two very different pages. (Hayley Miller for HuffPost)

Could the Avengers afford to live in their neighborhoods? (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

A group of tenants in Stuyvesant Town on Manhattan’s east side are going to court to protect more than 6,000 apartments from possible rent deregulation. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The scene trying to get in to Brooklyn’s Costco last weekend was insane, don’t think it’ll be any different this weekend (@vote4dongshen)

Not covering your cough during previous epidemics in NYC? Ticketed. Consider yourself lucky you’re only getting mean looks instead. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Are you an asshole? No? Okay, because some asshole sprayed an Asian subway passenger with cleaning fluid. (CBS New York)

COVID-19 has landed in Brooklyn. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

In true Albany fashion, Governor Cuomo added an expansion of his executive powers to a bill that allocated $40 million dollars to fighting COVID-19. (Ross Barkan for Gothamist)

Should you cancel a trip because of the coronavirus? Here are three questions to ask yourself before canceling a trip in panic. (Nicole Dieker for Lifehacker)

Your dog can’t give you COVID-19, but you can give COVID-19 to your dog. If you are quarantined, make sure it is without your best friend. The world is a cruel place. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Over 10,000 have signed a petition calling to close the city’s schools and transition to remote learning while the city deals with the coronavirus outbreak. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

How museums, theaters, and concert halls are dealing with coronavirus. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

If you’re sick and worried about coronavirus, are you supposed to visit your doctor or go to the hospital? The city has bungled its messaging about what to do if you think you’ve contracted COVID-19. You shouldn’t just go to your doctor, despite what the city says, because they may not be equipped to deal with an illness on this level and also protect themselves. Call ahead, tell them you think you have coronavirus and follow their instructions. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

New York City will order some public workers to get tested for coronavirus, and force them into quarantine if they refuse, according to an order issued Thursday by the city health department. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

A coalition of public defenders claims the NYPD is manipulating their own crime data in an effort to push a narrative that recent bail reform is causing a spike in crime on city streets. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The secrets of the historic St. George Theatre on Staten Island. (Nicola Saraniero for Untapped New York)

30 bars where you can meet new people, just don’t get to close if they’re touching their faces too much. (Bryan Kim, Katherine Lewin, Hillary Reinsberg, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Paula for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for December 19, 2019 – The “Here Come Governor Cuomo’s Subway Cops” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Mayor de Blasio interfered with a report on the schools’ yeshivas, this year’s most checked out books, the South Bronx is not SoBro, and more

Today – Low: 24˚ High: 28˚
Clear throughout the day.

The woman whose instagram posts inside the liana’s enclosure at the Bronx Zoo seemed to heave no fear, except of showing up at court. She no-showed her court date last week and a bench warrant has been issued for her arrest. (NY1)

Non-binary New Yorkers will no longer be labeled as male or female on their death certificates and can instead have an X. The city has offered an intersex designation for birth certificates since 2016 and a nonbinary X since 2018. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The MTA board, controlled but he governor, approved the governor’s proposal of hiring 500 new police officers to patrol subways and buses, costing $249 million in the next four years. The three board nominees appointed by Mayor de Blasio voted against the measure. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Misdemeanors in the city’s public transit system peaked in 2009, then declined, and have since been holding fairly steady, with some minor fluctuations, since 2012. Experts say Governor Cuomo’s claims that misdemeanors are up 11% is based on incomplete data. (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

Photos: Inside Gramercy Typewriter, one of the city’s last typewriter stores. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

The #1 book checked out of the NYPL this year was Becoming by Michelle Obama. Fine out the rest of the top ten and what was popular in each borough. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Stonewall House, New York City’s first affordable LGBT-friendly senior housing complex, is now open in Fort Greene. (Alexandra Alex for 6sqft)

The city’s 29th bicyclist in 2019 killed by a driver is Dr. Daniel J. Cammerman, a doctor at Mount Sinai Health System on the Upper East Side. The Upper East Side is a particularly dangerous place for cyclists. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork)

The NYPD have begun testifying in the juvenile court case of the 13-year-old accused of stabbing Tessa Majors to death. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

NYC’s 15 most iconic modern buildings. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Chase, Joe Coffee, and By CHLOE, the businesses in the location of the former Union Square Coffee Shop, are now open. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

So now we all know what a snow squall is. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Okay, but why did everyone in the city get a notification about the squall? The National Weather Service added squalls to their list of weather threats worthy of notifications in January of 2018. Wednesdays pair of notifications were the second and third ever to be issued in the city. (Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

Photos: One upside to freezing temperatures is the look of the plants at the New York Botanical Garden wearing icicles like jewelry. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The owners of the building where Erica Tishman was killed by falling debris on 49th St were fined for failure to maintain the building’s facade in October of 2018 and April of this year, which identified falling hazards for pedestrians. The building got approval to begin masonry work to repair the facade last month. Now that someone was killed as a result of their delays, repairs appear to have begun. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The city’s small claims court cases have a new upper limit of $10,000, up from $5,000. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

Stop trying to rebrand the South Bronx as SoBro. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Two-ways tolls are coming back to the Verrazzano. Rolled up into the $1.4 trillion government spending bill is changing the bridge’s one way $19.00 toll to an each-way $9.50 toll. Drivers re-route their trips to avoid tolls, making the East-bound direction of Staten Island more congested than necessary as a result. The bill is headed to the senate, where it’s expected to pass. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The Nevins Street Subway Raccoon was spotted on Tuesday night. What does this little scamp want? Probably the same as the rest of us on the subway, to be left alone. Trash panda-related subway delays have doubled in 2019, up to 11 total. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

A history of the Central Park carousel. (Patricia Youngquist for I Love the Upper West Side)

Mayor de Blasio delayed a report about the investigation into if private yeshivas in New York City were not providing their students with an adequate education as long as possible for his own political gain. A report from the DOE’s Special Commissioner of Investigation on the situation states the inquiry itself was delayed at least a year in order to drum up support for mayoral control of city schools. It’s been four years since the inquiry was supposed to start and no report has been produced. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio didn’t break the law, but he did interfere with his own Department of Education’s probe into the yeshivas. Now the mayor’s office sounds like an echo of the president, immediately issuing the statement “There’s no ‘there’ there, as evidenced by the finding of no wrongdoing.” (Eliza Shapiro and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

Jersey City has joined the federal lawsuit against the de Blasio administration for its placement of homeless families from the city in apartments controlled by slumlords in New Jersey. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

OMNY has arrived in the Bronx, starting with the E138 St, Grand Concourse, and 149th St stations. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The ten best dishes inside the new Essex Crossing. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The Briefly for July 30, 2019 – The “Never-Ending DA Election is Going to Court” Edition

Where rents are rising and falling, the top binge drinking neighborhoods in Brooklyn, the governor changes pot possession laws, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Members of The Proud Boys, a hate group according to the SPLC, are headed to trial for rioting for their fights with antifa protestors from an Upper East Side event in October. They’be being charged with rioting rather than assault because the antifa members who were involved are not cooperating with the NYPD. (NY Times)

Dave Chang has a new restaurant in the South Street Seaport. Is Bar Wayō enough to make you want to go to the financial district or will the neighborhood continue to be I Am Legend after 6:00? (Grub Street)

The New York City Board of Elections unanimously certified the results of the full, manual recount in the race for the Democratic nomination for Queens District Attorney. Melinda Katz won the primary. (Gothamist)

Tiffany Cabán and Melinda Katz’s campaigns will head to court on Wednesday to continue the June 25 Democratic primary until the bitter end. (NY Times)

Brooklyn Heights/Fort Greene and Park Slope/Carroll Gardens are the current kings of Kings County binge drinking, which also happen to be the two wealthiest districts in the borough. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Is public shaming enough to get NYC to change the name of “Negro Point,” which is a real spot on Randall’s Island? (Huff Post)

A $24 million dollar offer for his four-story building in the Upper East Side, denied. The story of one man who refuses to sell out in an attempt to preserve a neighborhood he perceives to be disappearing. (NY Times)

Hail seitan! Brooklyn is getting the first fully vegan sandwich shop in Seitan’s Helper at Precious Metal. (Bushwick Daily)

In an attempt to make the waiting experience less boring, the Empire State Building has a new gallery that is part Instagram-bait and part waiting area. (amNY)

Congressperson Yvette Clark introduced a bill that would ban the use of facial recognition technology from public housing. Face, voice, fingerprint and DNA identification tech would be banned from any housing that receives federal aid. (Curbed)

What’s in a name like Stone Street, Waverly Place, or Gold St? The hidden history behind 15 street names in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The South Bronx, Concourse Village, and Brownsville are the neighborhoods with the fastest rising rents. The biggest drops were in Maspeth (post-Amazon related?) and Borough Park. (Patch)

If you don’t know the name Sam Rudy, you know his work. His 40 years as a theater publicist included recent work on shows like Hamilton and Avenue Q. The Times interviewed him as he retires to Pennsylvania. (NY Times)

The Williamsburg Bayside Oil Depot is scheduled to be demolished. What’s that? Yes, of course, there is someone arguing that they should be saved. (6sqft)

The governor signed the bill into law that changes possession of up to two ounces of pot to a violation instead of a misdemeanor, meaning you’ll be fined instead of sent to jail. It also creates a process for records of certain charges of possession to be expunged. (Patch)

When he was 26, Carmine Cataldo thought his job running the newsstand at the Brooklyn Supreme Court was temporary. 36 years later, he’s retiring. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A guide to the Rockaways. Start planning your weekend. (6sqft)

It’s not summer until the nutcracker vendors hit the beaches. Unfortunately, the NYPD is attempting to change that in Rockaway Beach. (Gothamist)

People of color were significantly underrepresented in the city’s arts organizations and city government is starting to ask them to find ways to change. (NY Times)

The president signed the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund into law, providing financial support through 2090 to those injured or developed diseases due to their work after the attacks. (amNY)

Unsurprisingly, Trump made the signing of the bill about himself, continuing his history lying and exploitation of the 9/11 attacksthe city’s 18th cyclist killed by a driver. Em was doored by a driver and sent into the street where she was hit by a truck. (Streetsblog)

After the killing of Em Samolewicz, here is the city’s most dangerous intersections. (Curbed)

A palate cleanser. Three baby ducks were rescued from a sewer drain in Park Slope after being spooked by a dog. The ducks are recovering at the Sean Casey Animal Rescue. (Gothamist)

Emily Waters is giving away her art on Instagram. Meet the artist who is trying to assuage the constant stress of life with delight. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd “identified a flawed connection between some of the sensors and protective relays” which caused the July 13 blackout in Manhattan. (amNY)

The best museums in the city. (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.