The Briefly for July 30, 2019 – The “Never-Ending DA Election is Going to Court” Edition

Where rents are rising and falling, the top binge drinking neighborhoods in Brooklyn, the governor changes pot possession laws, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Members of The Proud Boys, a hate group according to the SPLC, are headed to trial for rioting for their fights with antifa protestors from an Upper East Side event in October. They’be being charged with rioting rather than assault because the antifa members who were involved are not cooperating with the NYPD. (NY Times)

Dave Chang has a new restaurant in the South Street Seaport. Is Bar Wayō enough to make you want to go to the financial district or will the neighborhood continue to be I Am Legend after 6:00? (Grub Street)

The New York City Board of Elections unanimously certified the results of the full, manual recount in the race for the Democratic nomination for Queens District Attorney. Melinda Katz won the primary. (Gothamist)

Tiffany Cabán and Melinda Katz’s campaigns will head to court on Wednesday to continue the June 25 Democratic primary until the bitter end. (NY Times)

Brooklyn Heights/Fort Greene and Park Slope/Carroll Gardens are the current kings of Kings County binge drinking, which also happen to be the two wealthiest districts in the borough. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Is public shaming enough to get NYC to change the name of “Negro Point,” which is a real spot on Randall’s Island? (Huff Post)

A $24 million dollar offer for his four-story building in the Upper East Side, denied. The story of one man who refuses to sell out in an attempt to preserve a neighborhood he perceives to be disappearing. (NY Times)

Hail seitan! Brooklyn is getting the first fully vegan sandwich shop in Seitan’s Helper at Precious Metal. (Bushwick Daily)

In an attempt to make the waiting experience less boring, the Empire State Building has a new gallery that is part Instagram-bait and part waiting area. (amNY)

Congressperson Yvette Clark introduced a bill that would ban the use of facial recognition technology from public housing. Face, voice, fingerprint and DNA identification tech would be banned from any housing that receives federal aid. (Curbed)

What’s in a name like Stone Street, Waverly Place, or Gold St? The hidden history behind 15 street names in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The South Bronx, Concourse Village, and Brownsville are the neighborhoods with the fastest rising rents. The biggest drops were in Maspeth (post-Amazon related?) and Borough Park. (Patch)

If you don’t know the name Sam Rudy, you know his work. His 40 years as a theater publicist included recent work on shows like Hamilton and Avenue Q. The Times interviewed him as he retires to Pennsylvania. (NY Times)

The Williamsburg Bayside Oil Depot is scheduled to be demolished. What’s that? Yes, of course, there is someone arguing that they should be saved. (6sqft)

The governor signed the bill into law that changes possession of up to two ounces of pot to a violation instead of a misdemeanor, meaning you’ll be fined instead of sent to jail. It also creates a process for records of certain charges of possession to be expunged. (Patch)

When he was 26, Carmine Cataldo thought his job running the newsstand at the Brooklyn Supreme Court was temporary. 36 years later, he’s retiring. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A guide to the Rockaways. Start planning your weekend. (6sqft)

It’s not summer until the nutcracker vendors hit the beaches. Unfortunately, the NYPD is attempting to change that in Rockaway Beach. (Gothamist)

People of color were significantly underrepresented in the city’s arts organizations and city government is starting to ask them to find ways to change. (NY Times)

The president signed the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund into law, providing financial support through 2090 to those injured or developed diseases due to their work after the attacks. (amNY)

Unsurprisingly, Trump made the signing of the bill about himself, continuing his history lying and exploitation of the 9/11 attacksthe city’s 18th cyclist killed by a driver. Em was doored by a driver and sent into the street where she was hit by a truck. (Streetsblog)

After the killing of Em Samolewicz, here is the city’s most dangerous intersections. (Curbed)

A palate cleanser. Three baby ducks were rescued from a sewer drain in Park Slope after being spooked by a dog. The ducks are recovering at the Sean Casey Animal Rescue. (Gothamist)

Emily Waters is giving away her art on Instagram. Meet the artist who is trying to assuage the constant stress of life with delight. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd “identified a flawed connection between some of the sensors and protective relays” which caused the July 13 blackout in Manhattan. (amNY)

The best museums in the city. (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for July 5, 2019 – The “We’re Headed for a Cabán/Katz Recount” Weekend Edition

The MTA’s weekend subway plans, congrats to Joey Chestnut, our absentee mayor continues to be absentee, Cash Cab is back, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

I hope everyone had a great 4th of July, regardless if you celebrated or not. July 4th was a cause for celebration for The Briefly as well. It’s the one year anniversary of the first email sent by The Briefly. Thank you for being a reader.

You might think of it as a holiday weekend, but the MTA has other plans. 12 subway lines have planned disruptions this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

Tiffany Cabán was 1,100 votes ahead of Melinda Katz on election night. As of July 4, she was 20 votes behind. Queens is headed for a manual recount. (NY Times)

More than 2,500 affidavit ballots were rejected and the Cabán campaign will be fighting to have them counted. This is the 2000 presidential election all over again. (Politico)

Congrats to Joey Chestnut on winning his 12th hot dog eating championship, with 71 hot dogs in 10 minutes. In Times Square, that would cost roughly $1,500. (amNY)

Despite what you experienced on July 4th, fireworks and sparklers continue to be illegal in New York. (amNY)

After multiple years and nearly a half billion dollars in renovations, full service on the N train has been restored in Brooklyn. (The City)

The panel of experts overseeing the rehab of the BQE hasn’t made any decisions, but have intimated that the plans the city has put forward, which include replacing the Brooklyn Promenade with a temporary highway, have little chance of being approved. (Brooklyn Paper)

Our mayor, who spent July 4th in Iowa, said “I’m a half-glass-full kind of guy” when it comes to his polling numbers, which are in the toilet. His office in New York, which is been full empty, as he pretends he’s not wasting time and money in Iowa. He missed the funeral for 9/11 responder and NYPD detective Lou Alvarez and failed to preside over the weigh-in for Nathan’s hot dog eating competition, something Mayor Bloomberg did 11 of the 12 years he was mayor. (Gothamist)

26 (kind of obvious, but still a solid list) things to do in the city this summer. (Curbed)

The Central Park bomber has been at-large for three years. (Gothamist)

There are 25 horses in the Prospect Park Stable, and each “manufacture” 75 pounds of poop daily, bringing the total to nearly a daily ton of horseshit. The owner of the stable has begun turning the manure into compost and gifting it to the nonprofit Red Hook Farms. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Got a hankering for strawberries? Here’s a list of where to get yourself a strawberry dessert. (Grub Street)

Bushwick’s The Notorious B.I.G. and Alfred Hitchcock mural was vandalized. A video was taken of the vandal, but they haven’t been found (Bushwick Daily)

Community Board 7 voted to approve a bike lane for Central Park West. The neighborhood will lose 400 parking spots in the process, but the board weighed those parking spots vs the life of Madison Lyden, who died after she was forced from the current bike lane by a parked cab and hit by a truck. (Streetsblog)

Eliot Engel, who represents parts of the Bronx, Westchester, and Yonkers in the House of Representatives, is the next New York Democrat to be primaried from the left. His challengers cite is conservative views on Israel, the Middle East, and education among some of the reasons they feel he needs to be challenged. (Politico)

The city’s sheriff arrested Anthony Medina, a debt collector who allegedly scammed on cab drivers by pretending to be a city marshall to harass drivers into giving up their medallions and cabs and occasionally shook them down for cash. (Gothamist)

The East Village’s Mikey Likes It is closed after a tax-related seizure last week. (EV Grieve)

Cash Cab is back and will be filming in NYC this summer. (amNY)

The removal of the citizenship question from the 2020 census is a win for New York, as state Attorney General Letitia James’s office helped lead the charge against it. (Patch)

Four neighborhoods, Crown Heights, Bed-Stuy, East New York, and Brownsville account for 23% of the city’s shootings this year. Despite a trend towards less violent crime in the city, shootings and reported rapes citywide have increased this year. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Where to eat and what to do at the South Street Seaport. (amNY)

The principal of LaGuardia High School, Dr. Lisa Mars, has stepped down following a sit-in by the students and years of protests by students, teachers, and faculty. A divergence from the school’s mission is what drive the protests and the vote of “no confidence” in May. (Gothamist)

Serial subway groper Giovanni Verdelli has been arrested 70 times and the NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill is calling for his permanent banning from the subways. (Downtown Express)

The ultimate guide to Penn Station. (Curbed)

The man who tossed piss onto two transit workers in April, Brandon Jobson, was arrested and charged with two counts of assault. You’re in trouble, Brandon. (Gothamist)

The entire Brooklyn Congressional delegation called for the firing of Customer and Border Protection officers after posts in a private Facebook group with 9,000 members surfaces with threats to Congressmember Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and insensitive comments about the ongoing crisis at the United States’ southern border. (Kings County Politics)

Spots for a big group hang outside. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for June 24, 2019 – The “In Defense of a New York City Summer” Edition

What was on and what was off the state’s legislative agenda, the summer forecast, the Mermaid Parade, pity the real estate investors, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The weekend subway disruptions are over, just in time for late-night weekday disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Queens Democrats, you have the chance to vote for your next District Attorney primary on Tuesday. Last minute dropouts, endorsements, and ads are setting the candidates apart from each other. (Politico)

Candidate Tiffany Cabán is following the AOC playbook to a possible Queens DA election victory. It helps she’s also received AOC’s endorsement. (NY Times)

In 2017, lead was found in the water fountains in multiple city schools. In a small investigation in four schools, WNYC found high levels of lead-paint contamination in the city’s schools. (Gothamist)

When was your last true “what the hell” subway moment? How about this one caught on video with an argument between a man holding a gun and another holding a bat? (@SubwayCreatures)

The summer’s long-range weather predictions have been made for the city, and it’s gonna be a hot year. (Patch)

In defense of summer in the city. (Gothamist)

There is a small ring of people stealing the earnings from Lyft and Uber drivers across the city using the drivers’ own phones to take the money. (Gothamist)

The ten oldest theaters in Times Square. (Untapped Cities)

After about 200 shows, Broadway’s ‘Be More Chill’ is set to close on August 11. (amNY)

Stargazing isn’t impossible in the city you just have to know where to look. (Atlas Obscura)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health includes a Little Italy favorite, a USPS cafeteria (which is also this week’s winner for most violations), and multiple others. (Patch)

If you’ve got the bug and are looking to run for elected office in the city, here’s how it just got a little easier. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Cardi B was indicted from a fight in a strip club was last year. She rejected a plea deal that would have required no jail time and was paired with reduced charges in April. (amNY)

Your guide to summer in Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s a look at 12 things the Democrat-dominated state’s legislature accomplished this year. (NY Times)

The list of accomplishments in the state legislature looks impressive, but here’s what didn’t make the agenda. (Gothamist)

One thing that was left off the legislative agenda was the mayor’s attempts to change the specialized high school entrance exams. Consider the effort dead, with multiple Democrats voting against it in committee and it never seeing a floor vote. (NY Times)

What happened to the automatic voter registration bill? A “typo” derailed the effort and it will have to be taken up in the next legislative session. (Gothamist)

Maybe electric bikes shouldn’t be allowed in bike lanes? Wait, what?This makes sense if you’re the mayor, the rest of us will be left to scratch our heads. (Patch)

A body was found floating off Pier 36 on the Lower East Side. The body wasn’t identified outside of being a male Asian in his 30s. (The Villager)

The 14th St Busway, scheduled to take hold on July 1, was hit with a lawsuit by residents of Chelsea and the West Village. The lawsuit says the city hasn’t properly studied how banning cars will impact the surrounding neighborhoods. (Curbed)

Here are the details about what’s changing about marijuana in New York after the state’s decriminalization bill. (amNY)

The MTA is reorganizing this summer, but since the governor didn’t put one of the mayor’s board recommendations to the state senate, the city will have one less representative during the discussions. It’s possible that it was a simple mistake, but it’s also possible that this is another part of the rich tapestry that is the feud between Cuomo and de Blasio. (Politico)

Video: You’ve ridden the subways, the buses, the ferries, but have you ridden the Roosevelt Island tram? Here’s the history behind the city’s unique travel option. (Viewing NYC)

If you savor a truly awful smell, the New York Botanical Garden’s corpse flower appears just about ready to bloom. It hits peak bloom for 24-36 hours, so if you’re looking to savor the smell of what is described as rotting meat, keep an eye on the flower’s status. (Gothamist)

The Nautilus, a new interactive art installation near the Seaport, is like a giant space-age musical instrument using light poles you can touch to produce sounds. The installation will be there through September 10. (Time Out)

The Coney Island Brewery, aptly located in Coney Island, will be expanding in August. (Brooklyn Paper)

This year’s Mermaid Parade in pictures. (BrooklynVegan)

and more pics. (amNY)

You can uncover your eyes. The Flying Wallendas successfully made the tightrope walk 25 stories above midtown. (NY Times)

Everyone pity the real estate investors, who have taken time out of their busy schedules to whine to any media outlet that will listen about how they won’t be able to deregulate rent-controlled apartments or unreasonably raise rents. (Splinter)

The city’s best cold noodle dishes. (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.