The Briefly for New Year’s Eve, 2019 – The “Best of the Year, Best of the Decade” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The best restaurants, the dumbest things de Blasio has said, the best on Broadway, the most popular baby names, Times Square on NYE, and more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 46˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

Vita Coco and Postmates are giving out hangover recovery kits on New Year’s Day. Plan accordingly. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Everything you need to know about the Coney Island Polar Plunge on New Year’s Day. (Meaghan McGoldrick for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Rachel Harrison, Hans Haacke and the top ten art exhibitions of the year. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

13 good things that happened in 2019. (Amy Plitt)

76,000 people left New York in 2019, more than any other state. To those who left, we all say “See ya!” (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The world’s longest boa, the world’s tallest politician, a $70,000 dreidel, and the rest of the year in world records set by New Yorkers. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Look for a live stream of Times Square? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

How to get around on New Year’s Eve. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

If you’re the kind of psychopath who must do Times Square tonight, here’s what to expect for security. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork)

The dumbest things said by Mayor de Blasio in 2019 .(Streetsblog)

The Times gets a little navel-gazey looking back at nine ways the city changed in the past decade. (Gina Bellafante for NY Times)

The Women’s March movement, a solo LEGO art exhibition, the Mermaid Parade, and the rest of the best photos of 2019. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Looking at the best and worst of the year in Broadway theater. (Matt Windman for amNewYork)

A Strange Loop from Michael R. Jackson tops Adam Feldman’s top ten theater productions of the year. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

The top baby names of 2018 were released by the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Emma was the top name for girls for the second year in a row and Liam topped the boys for the third year straight .(Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The two biggest design stories of the year, the Hudson Yards’ Vessel and the Hunters Point Library, are both stories of accessibility failures. (Alexandra Lange for Curbed)

Delays, fare increases, construction, fare increases, unexpected express trains, fare increases, and the rest of the best and worst of the decade in NYC transit . Seriously there was five fare increases this decade.(Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Ryan Sutton’s best restaurants of the year: Kāwi and Llama San and 13 runners up. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Eater asked 19 writers, editors, directors, and photographers their favorite new restaurants this year. It’s like eavesdropping at a party you have to attend. (Eater)

From the “overheard at a party” category, the top complaints about dining in the city. (Eater)

The cheese and tomato sandwich at USHA Foods, Mama’s Special at Leo’s Latticini, and the full list of Robert Sietsema’s 11 best sandwiches of the year. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The top dishes of the year according to Ryan Sutton were the rice cake fundido at Haenyeo, the Duck Nigiri at Llama San, and The Electric Lemon Curd at Electric Lemon. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Ceviche at Restaurante Y Panaderia Guatemalteco, The Brighton Beach at Wheated and the the complete list of Robert Sietsema’s 15 best dishes of the year. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

A suitable way to end the year: Widow Rat. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Briefly for August 14, 2019 – The “Hangry Squirrels Want Your Blood” Edition

Corey Johnson’s Rat Academy, the city and state challenge the “public charge” rule, Inwood fights rezoning, the best pastrami and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Are you ready for Rat Academy? City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is hosting an event with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on August 22 for free training on safe and effective methods for rat prevention. (Facebook)

In the first year of the city’s Culture Pass program, 70,000 tickets to 50 cultural institutions across the city like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Second Stage, and others were given out. Anyone with a library card is eligible for CulturePass. (amNY)

Google Maps will now show the location of Lime bikes in the city. (Curbed)

The squirrels in Battery Park are out for blood. Don’t let them woo you into a false sense of security with their fluffy tails and seeming meekness. According to a new warning from city officials, they’re vicious little hellbeasts who will go for your food at any cost. (Gothamist)

The city’s subway stations are in pretty poor shape, but they’re the worst in Queens, where 44% of the structural components are in disrepair. The good news in this is that the overall number od station with serious structural deficiencies actually fell from 2012 to 2017. (LIC Post)

The governor signed a new law into place strengthening the state’s sexual harassment protections. (Gothamist)

David Chang continues his “I built my businesses on the foundation of Stephen Ross’s money” apology tour, donating all of the profits his restaurants to different progressive organizations. (Eater)

An oral (and visual!) history of Winston the Wonder Dog that jumped off a roof, fell through a sunroof and seems to be doing okay. (Gothamist)

Broadway producer Ben Sprecher was arrested on Tuesday morning on child pornography charges. (Gothamist)

What does “parents buying” mean on a real estate listing? Pretty much what you might imagine it would. (StreetEasy)

An NYPD officer committed suicide on Tuesday morning, the eighth of the year. An average year sees five officers commit suicide. (NY Times)

The Off-Broadway “How I Learned to Drive” won a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1998 and 23 years later the show will reunite on Broadway in 2020 with David Morse and Mary-Louise Parker reprising their original roles. (NY Times)

Snapple is spending the summer paying tribute to “Boroughs & Burbs,” and the label designs are about as embarrassing as a drink designed by Bret Michaels. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The warden at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan has been temporarily reassigned after the suicide of Jeffrey Epstein and the two guards guarding him have been put on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation into his death. (NY Times)

The Metropolitan Correctional Center historically has had issues with overcrowding, understaffing, cleanliness, and medical care. This is the same facility that experienced a multi-day heat and electricity outage during the coldest days of last winter. (Gothamist)

The new transit fare OMNY system hit its millionth fare on August 8, four times faster than planned. The MTA has no plans to roll out the system ahead of schedule and will be in all stations and buses by the end of 2020. (amNY)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for some big outages over the next two weekends as the MTA is wrapping up a rehab project. Service will be shut down between Harlem and Downtown Brooklyn. (amNY)

Today is the first day of the special “look-back” period for sexual abuse lawsuits in the state and thousands of cases are expected to be filed. The suits are being triggered by the Child Victims Act, which increased the statute of limitation for child sexual abuse from age 23 to age 55 and included this one-year “look-back” period. (amNY)

This weekend Apartment 5A: A Tribute to the Show About Nothing takes over Parasol Projects on the Bowery. It’s an exhibition dedicated to all things Seinfeld in celebration of the show’s 30th anniversary. (Gothamist)

Meet Jamaal Bowman, Cornerstone Academy for Social Action’s principal, who is challenging Congressperson Eliot Engel for the 16th Congressional District seat in the House of Representatives. Bowman has the backing of Justice Democrats, the group who pushed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez into office. (Gothamist)

The city and state are once again planning to take the federal government to court. This time it’s over the final “public charge” rule, which would require immigrants seeking green cards or visas to show they are not likely to rely on certain government programs like food stamps. Without challenge, the rule would go into effect in October. (Patch)

There is only one legal hostel in New York City thanks to the city’s building codes. Council members Mark Gjonaj and Margaret Chin are looking to change that with a new bill that will give hostels their own classification and a regulatory agency to look over them. (Gothamist)

Video: What’s the best pastrami sandwich in the city? (Viewing NYC)

Five finalists in the Big Ideas for Small Lots architecture competition are being displayed at the Center for Architecture. The competition highlights the challenges facing a number of the city’s 10,000 small and/or oddly-shaped lots and faces those challenges with unconventional developments. (Curbed)

A look back at the efforts of Jackie O and preservationists to save Grand Central Terminal from the same fate as the original Penn Station. (6sqft)

Opening arguments were heard on Tuesday in a lawsuit meant to prevent the rezoning of Inwood. The lawsuit accuses the city of failing to look at the environmental impact of the rezoning, particularly among racial lines. The rezoning was approved after three years of community protest that the rezoning continues Mayor de Blasio’s selling out the city to developers. (Gothamist)

A 3.2-acre farm is opening in Brooklyn on the rooftop of the Liberty View Industrial Plaza mall in Sunset Par and operated by Brooklyn Grange. Once the space officially opens, it will be open to the public on Sundays through October. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The opening of a sanitation garage may not seem like a big deal, but it is when a neighborhood’s been waiting for it since 1985. Having a local garage means trash pickup times can change from evenings to mornings, which means a change in how the neighborhood looks and smells. (Kings County Politics)

The classic steakhouses of New York City. (Eater)