The Briefly for April 7, 2020 – The “No, We Are Not Burying Dead Bodies in City Parks” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor ends his open streets program, a guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery, the hardest temp job in the city, weird things people are doing, & more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 64˚
Light rain overnight.

Punk Island, one of the city’s best DIY and free music festivals, is postponed from its usual June date. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Video: A beautifully shot montage of a barren city, titled “The New Normal Quarantine.” (Matt Chirico)

No matter what you read, the city does not have plans to bury the dead in public parks. The rumor originated by Mark D. Levine, the Chair of New York City Council health committee, who spent the entire day on Twitter walking back the mess that he created. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s official body count from COVID-19 of 2,738 is likely a vast undercount. On a “normal” day, about 20-25 New Yorkers die in their homes, but in our new reality, about 200 people are dying at home on a daily basis. Those bodies are not tested for COVID-19, so they are not listed as a confirmed case. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

City schools will continue remote learning on Passover and Good Friday this year, completely removing spring break from the calendar. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

The June Regents exams are canceled. The state is trying to figure out graduation requirements since the Regents is a requirement. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

If the June Regents are canceled, does the June SAT and ACT date stand a chance? (Benjamin Mandile for QNS)

A look inside the slow collapse of the city’s catering industry. (Kaitlin Menza for Grub Street)

If you’re having trouble understanding what being six feet apart looks like, the city is installing signs showing you how far to stay away from your fellow New Yorker. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

I don’t think that when Acting Queens Borough President Sharon Lee accepted a temporary job that she’d be imagining she’d be overseeing the worst-hit county in the country with an election date that was already postponed once. (Todd Maisel for QNS)

If you’re looking for the slightest bit of good news, it seems like the growth of the novel coronavirus outbreak in New York City might be slowing down. (Ann Choi and Yoav Gonen for The City)

Three cheers to the landlords across the city choosing to not demand rent this month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The first jail inmate to test positive for COVID-19 at Rikers Island, Michael Tyson (not the one you’re thinking of), died on Sunday while awaiting a hearing on a parole violation. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

The New York Public Library and WYNC are teaming together to launch a virtual book club, the club is virtual, the book is real. The first book is James McBride’s Deacon King Kong. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Yes, a tiger in the Bronx Zoo has COVID-19. Your pet is probably okay. Just treat them as an extension of yourself. Keep distance from other people and dogs. (James Gorman for NY Times)

Tuesday night will be a pink supermoon, climbing to its highest point at 10:35 pm. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What’s harder than finding a good one-bedroom in a great neighborhood that doesn’t break the bank? Trying to order groceries for delivery. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Your best bets for grocery delivery in the city. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New York is on PAUSE through April 29, a two-week extension. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Video: It’s a touch of history from the end of World War I in Woodhaven. The Memorial Trees were planted after the first world war and were mostly forgotten to time until a few years ago. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

It seems that we’re not good at staying home, according to our location data. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Maybe that’s why 311 received over 4,000 complaints about a lack of social distancing in its first week of receiving complaints. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

New York Cliché, a favorite of The Briefly, is looking for pitches and is paying for posts. She wrote a great piece about getting tickets to late-night talk shows, but then the world went to hell so I never posted it. (Mary Lane for New York Cliché)

Reimagined NYC road signs for our new lives by artist Dylan Coonrad. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A list of NYC restaurants raising funds to feed healthcare workers. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art released a new lineup of free digital programming. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Satire: NYPD Razes Central Park Hospital Tents For Violating Outdoor Encampment Laws. (The Onion)

Performance activist Billy Talen was arrested after planting a rainbow flag on Sunday in protesting Samaritan’s Purse, the anti-gay religious group behind Central Park’s field hospital. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor is ending his “open streets” program after it wasn’t popular enough to justify the heavy NYPD presence at each closed street. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A running list of Mayor de Blasio’s coronavirus response missteps. (Elizabeth Kim, Jen Carlson, and Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 major proposals not included in the state’s new budget. #1? Marijuana legalization. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve done in quarantine? (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The pandemic guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Lisa Rosenblum for submitting today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for January 22, 2020 – The “You’ll Never Escape A Fart On These New Subway Cars” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The fanciest Duane Reade, Pete Wells defends loud restaurants, the MTA hired six new white and male executives, Brooklyn’s new democratic leader & more

Today – Low: 29˚ High: 39˚
Clear throughout the day.

Governor Andrew Cuomo released his 2021 executive budget proposal in Albany, a $178 billion spending plan, including a 1.9% increase over 2020. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

In one attempt to fix the state’s $6.1 billion deficit, the governor is putting a focus on cutting the state’s Medicaid costs by $2.5 billion. (Jesse McKinley and Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

Part of the state budget is an increase of $826 million to education funding, bringing it to $28.5 billion for the year, but it still falls short of the $2 billion state officials requested in December. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Take your first look at the new kind of subway cars featuring no doors between cars, wider doors, security cameras, and more real-time information. (Elise Czajkowski for 1010 WINS)

The surrounding a wall that would visually separate a privately-owned public space inside Hudson Yards from the from the High Line and would block the High Line’s views of the space highlights the problem with private developers building public spaces. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Photos: Here is the city’s fanciest Duane Reade, and it’s on Wall St of course. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer dropped out of the race for Queens borough president, citing family reasons. (Christian Murray and Allie Griffin for Jackson Heights Post)

We’ll just go with the headline for this one. Making Sauce With Instagram’s Mildly Furious, Exceedingly Horny Italian Uncle (Rachel Handler for Grub Street)

The blowback continues against Eric Adams for his idiotic comments on how newcomers should “go back to Ohio,” including pushing back on his thesis and bringing up how his campaign for mayor is accepting donations from the real estate industry. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

If you’ve ever gone looking for where Ebbets Field used to stand, you know how hard it is to find the small plaque, noting where home plate once was. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The MTA will overhaul all of the 42nd St stations in one large $750 move to cut costs and speed up the schedule from 49 months to 36. Grand Central, Bryant Park, and Times Square stations are included as well as the ADA compliance for the 42nd St Shuttle and signal upgrades. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Video: The story of Seneca Village, the lost Black community underneath the west side of Central Park. (Ranjani Chakraborty for Vox’s Missing Chapter)

In defense of the loud restaurant. (Pete Wells for NY Times)

Four people died across the city in four fires on Monday. The last of the four victims was 11-year-old Shirr Teved in Kensington. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Appellate judges upheld former State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s convictions in a real estate scheme and money-laundering, but overturned a corruption conviction. Silver will remain in prison and be resentenced by the trial judge. (Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

Martin Luther King III, Lucy Liu, and Lin-Manuel Miranda will serve as co-chairs for the 2020 Census Council. (Alexandra Alexa)

Tips on upgrading your apartment on a budget. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is calling on Manhattan District Attorney to resign based on how his handling of sexual assault accusations against Harvey Weinstein, Jeffrey Epstein and Dominique Strauss-Kahn show evidence of a dangerous pattern of leniency. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Brooklyn Democratic Party has a new chair in State Assemblymember Rodneyse Bichotte, the first woman to hold the post. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The MTA has six new top-level hires, including a chief transformation officer, chief operating officer, chief innovation officer, chief people officer, chief technology officer, and chief procurement officer. Maybe among them should have been a chief diversity officer, because all six C-level hires are white men. Only 18% of the MTA’s 74,000 employees are women. (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

Congratulations to Baseball Hall of Famer Derek Jeter on this year’s induction. The induction ceremony is July 26. (NY1)

After the United States’ first case of Coronavirus, the CDC will be screening arrivals to JFK from Wuhan, China for Coronavirus. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What is it about old lofts and buildings styled like old lofts in NYC that tech companies love so much? (Winnie Hu and Matthew Haag for NY Times)

22 excellent restaurants for vegetarians. (Eater)

The Briefly for April 3, 2019 – The “Ghosting Capital of the World” Edition

The plastic bag ban may birth a paper bag fee, New Yorkers disapprove of congestion pricing, Irving Plaza will temporarily close, and more in today’s daily NYC newsletter.

Bay Ridge’s greatest Italian hero is vegan? Sacrilege! (Eater)

With the eventual plastic bag ban taking place next year, the city is also considering a $0.05 fee for paper bags to benefit the NYC Environmental Protection Fund and go towards giving low-income New Yorkers and the elderly reusable bags for free. (Gothamist)

New York City is the capital of ghosting. 41% of New Yorkers say they’ve been ghosted, higher than any of the other 48 cities surveyed. (Time Out)

The Zagat guide book is coming back for New York City and your vote matters, much like participatory budgeting. You voted for participatory budgeting, right? (NY Times)

Here’s how the new mansion tax will affect luxury real estate. (Curbed)

The 10 best spots for plant classes. (6sqft)

We’re #1! #1 in the highest chunk of our paychecks that go towards taxes. (Patch)

Chanel Lewis is guilty of the 2016 killing of Karina Vetrano. It was Lewis’s second trial. (Gothamist)

Yesterday was one of six Gender Pay Gap days, and in New York, the gap has only gotten worse. (Gothamist)

The Tony Luke’s Philly cheesesteak has arrived in New York. Is it any good? (Grub Street)

So maybe escape rooms are dangerous if you, you know, can’t actually escape? (Gothamist)

Tracy Morgan got a key to Brooklyn, so what did he do with it? (amNY)

Governor Cuomo got an 11.7% raise this year and will get a 12.5% raise next year and an additional 11% in 2021. Not a bad job to have. (NY Post)

There’s a new chairman and CEO of the MTA, but it’s a little weird the state approved Pat Foye for the job on Monday morning at 2am. (Gothamist)

Governors Island’s 2019 season starts in a month and will have expanded hours and an additional ferry from Manhattan. (Curbed)

The Regional Planning Association has a suggestion to reduce traffic on the section of the BQE that needs repairs: reduce the number of lanes. (Curbed)

Missing from the state’s budget? No, not legal weed. No, not a pied-à-terre tax. No, not a ban on bump stocks. No, not increased oversight. Electric scooters. (Gothamist)

A Quinnipiac University poll shows that 54% of New Yorkers are against congestion pricing. The opposition is highest in the Bronx, where 62% disagree with the passing of the new rules. (NY State of Politics)

Also in the poll is that 57% of those surveyed favor changing admissions to the city’s specialized high schools. (NY Post)

Three alleged MS-13 members have been indicted on murder charges for the shooting death of a man on the 7 train platform on February 3. (Jackson Heights Post)

If you’ve ever stepped into the wrong car assuming it was your Lyft or Uber, you’re not alone. After the death of Samantha L. Josephson, who stepped into the wrong car in South Carolina, City council Speaker Corey Johnson says a bill requiring all for-hire drivers to have illuminated signs in their windows makes sense for NYC. (NY Post)

What’s behind the spike in murders in Brooklyn? (NY Times)

We’re just about to get Webster Hall back and now Irving Plaza announced it will close for eight months later this year for renovations. (BrooklynVegan)

The NYPD’s Inspector General’s Office recommended 42 reforms in a report. Of the 42, six have been implemented, 16 have been outright rejected and the rest sit in limbo. Must be nice to make your own rules. (Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio has suspended the proposed cuts to the FDNY, agreeing to meet with the department and unions to figure out a new deal. (NY Post)

Reports of rapes in the city have seen a slight decrease since last year, the second decrease in the last 18 months. Before December of 2018, the last time reported rapes had decreased was August 2017. (Patch)

The state budget called for a reduction of Special Olympics funding by $50,000, but after the federal government pulled all of its funding the state has reversed its decision. (NY State of Politics)

Where to eat and drink with your human (when you’re a dog). (Thrillist)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.