The Briefly for February 8, 2019 – The “MTA Is A Disgrace For This State, We All Know It” Edition

The weekend’s subway closures, the Grand Hyatt on 42nd will be torn down, an NYPD captain attacked a cyclist, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you normally ride the 4, 5, D, N, and Q trains, get ready for a rough weekend. If you’re along the L, you already know what to expect. The weekend is only a few hours away, make sure to check the trains for closures and diversions before you head out. (6sqft)

The city will have to cut $750 million from its 2020 fiscal budget to make up for a near billion dollar shortfall of tax revenues. (amNY)

Andres Lopez Elorez was sentenced to six years in prison for his role in smuggling liquid heroin stuffed inside puppies. (NY Times)

“The MTA is a disgrace for this state, we all know it,” said the man who has so much control over the MTA that he was able to cancel the entire L train shutdown. (Curbed)

Why did an NYPD captain apparently tackle a man riding a bike in Midtown? (Streetsblog)

This is pretty cool. The city’s budget includes money to install technology at 300 intersections that will hold green lights and shorten red lights for keep city buses moving faster. (Streetsblog)

How’s the rezoning going in Gowanus? The community’s not thrilled. (Bklyner)

Did MTV cancel “Made in Staten Island?” Maybe those 9,300 signatures on change.org made a difference. (amNY)

If you don’t love the Mandarin Duck while he molts, you don’t deserve him at his best. (Gothamist)

Happy national pizza day on Saturday. Never forget John Stewart’s epic anti-Chicago deep-dish “pizza” rant.

Margaret Cho, Jon Glaser, Dave Hill, and more join Red Room Orchestra for two back-to-back evenings of live music from Twin Peaks and the films of Wes Anderson at Symphony Space on February 15 & 16. (Sponsored by Symphony Space)

Metropolitan Republican Club, the epicenter of the Proud Boys fights last year, has a new president. Ian Reilly formerly advised a group that endorsed shooting migrants, forgetting the Holocaust, and marched with neo-Nazis. (Gothamist)

The oil smell in the L train tunnels has lingered all week. The smells have made at least three MTA workers sick and caused the train to stop service for a period of time on Wednesday. (Brokelyn)

The 10 most charming spots in the Greenwich Village Historic District. (6sqft)

“Statues for Equality” will bring 10 bronze sculptures of women to the city. The 10 will raise the number of statues of women in the city by 200%. (6sqft)

The 25 most expensive homes for sale, if you’re looking to do a bit of shopping. (Curbed)

Whoops! Public Advocate candidate Ron Kim forgot to mention his ownership of multiple luxury properties to a state ethics agency. (The Real Deal)

The 10 highest grossing Broadway shows of all time. (Viewing NYC)

Say farewell to the Grand Hyatt on 42nd. Donald Trump’s first major Manhattan project is being torn down and replaced. (NY Post)

Etna Tool & Die was a staple of Bond Street for a century in a neighborhood with apartments selling for over ten million dollars. The building’s new owner has no intentions of giving in to the neighborhood’s pressures. (NY Times)

The most romantic restaurants in the city. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for February 1, 2019 – The “Live from New York, It’s Saturday And Live” Edition

A 49 square foot apartment, the city signs partial control over the NYCHA to the Trump administration, weekend subway changes, congestion pricing comes to for-hire vehicles, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The good news is the 7 train is back to running between Queens and Manhattan. The bad news is it’s easier to list the subway lines with no scheduled outages or changes this weekend: 2, 3, 6, and Q. Everything else? Check on the trains before you go. (6sqft)

The federal government, Ben Carson, and the Department of Housing and Urban Development have new authority over the NYCHA. HUD will have a say in appointing NYCHA’s next CEO and select a monitor to oversee operations. The city will dedicate $2.2 billion in funding, HUD will contribute $1.5 billion this year, and NYCHA will undergo a restructuring. (amNY)

Your taxi, Uber, Lyft, etc rides will soon cost more as congestion pricing is coming to your for-hire cars. (NY Times)

“SNL” stands for Saturday AND Live, right? Donald Trump Jr seems to think so. (@MattBinder)

If you think parking in the city is hard, wait until you try parking without any signage. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Is the closure of St Mark’s Comics the death knell for the Easy Village? Maybe not. The GVSHP is calling for an East Village Special Zoning District to Protect Small Businesses and Discourage Chain Stores to be created with a petition. That’s a mouthful! (GVSHP)

After 20 years, Greenpoint institution Enid’s is closing at the end of March. (Greenpointers)

A fascinating look behind the scenes at Saturday And Live’s cue cards. (Gothamist)

The New York City Economic Development Corporation tries to defend Amazon HQ2 with a 53 second video explaining what the city can do with $13.5 billion in taxes. (Viewing NYC)

Trader Joe’s in Union Square will end home deliveries. Time to go get your own peanut butter filled pretzels. (EV Grieve)

Cheers to the one man show that is the Booze History Museum of Staten Island. (NY Times)

NY Attorney General Letitia James’ office joined five other states to sue the Trump administration for reversing the “good neighbor” provision of the Clean Air Act. (Huff Post)

If you thought the bros at your gym were bad, wait until you see the “exclusive space for a performance-driven lifestyle” built for influencers. A gym whose application requires your Instagram handle. #eyeroll. (Gothamist)

39 Av-Dutch Kills on the N/W in Astoria is now open, and it includes the colorful glass work “Hellion Equilibrium” by Sarah Morris. (MTA/Flickr)

Legal marijuana might not be a part of the state’s budget, which is due April 1. (NY Post)

Every Petland Discounts store, include the 20 throughout the city, will close on April 18. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Manhattan is getting a beach in 2022, designed by the same firm that designed the High Line. (NY Post)

Misconduct suits against the NYPD rose 13% in 2018. (NY Post)

The bodega that Lesandro ‘Junior’ Guzman-Feliz was murdered outside of will beomce the Bronx’s first safe bodega. A panic button will be installing among other security upgrades. The bodega has changed ownership and management since Junior’s death. (Bronx Times)

What would you sacrifice for $510/month in rent on the Upper West Side? How about this 49 square foot apartment? Oh yeah, no air conditioners, no kitchen, and a shared bathroom. (6sqft)

12 of the hottest brunch spots in the city. (Eater)

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The Briefly for January 15, 2019 – The “8% Rate of Success” Edition

Early voting passes the state legislature, Governor Cuomo thinks the city should foot half the bill for the subway, the best winter brunches, the Amazon-Chrysler building, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

10 short interviews about congestion pricing with state legislators. (Streetsblog)

The annual No Pants Subway Ride happened. There are photos. (Gothamist)

Voting reform passed the state legislature, which adds 10 days of early voting, consolidates state and federal primary dates, and pre-registers 17 and 17-year-olds when they sign up for a driving permit. A constitutional amendment was proposed that will allow same-day voter registration and allow anyone to vote absentee without an excuse.(CBS New York)

Signal problems caused delays during 92% of weekdays in 2018. Since the city enacted the Subway Action Plan, delays have increased. (Daily News)

The state is doubling the amount of speed cameras in the city’s school zones as part of Governor Cuomo’s state budget, increasing from 149 to 290, which matches the number of cameras the state’s legislature was trying to pass last year. (Streetsblog)

The best winter brunch spots. (Thrillist)

This is why we can’t have nice things. The city is suing Metropolitan Property Group for running an illegal Airbnb network in 130 apartments, which housing more than 75,000 guests from 2015 to 2018. (The Real Deal)

Okay, so “Amazon” is the new default answer for any question, but who will be the Chrysler Building’s new tenant? Yup, Amazon. (6sqft)

Here’s what to know about the city’s new, updated and existing ferry routes. (amNY)

Meet Yannick Nézet-Séguin, the the Metropolitan Opera new openly gay conductor. (NY Times)

Say farewell to Westsider Books on Broadway in the Upper West Side. Not every closing bookstore has a Lin-Manuel Miranda. (West Side Rag)

“Being from Staten Island gives you that ability to brush it off.” Being from Staten Island made the cast of MTV’s “Made in Staten Island” immune to criticism that they are tarnishing the pristine public image of Staten Island. (amNY)

The secret economy of diabetes test strips. (NY Times)

Everyone wants to be the one that fixes the subways, but no one wants to pay for it. (NY Post)

Do you have what it takes to drink this $375, 20 pound spiked hot chocolate? (Time Out)

Five things to look for in today’s state budget address today (Tuesday). (amNY)

The Port Authority removed the Saudi Arabia part of the “Candy Nations” art installation due to its proximity to the World Trade Center due to complains that point out the Saudi connection to the 9/11 attacks. (NY Post)

JFK and Laguardia airports have been providing food to TSA and Federal Aviation Administration workers while they aren’t paid during President Trump’s government shutdown. (Airport Voice)

The government shutdown means no family visiting at Metropolitan Correctional Center, the high-security federal jail in Manhattan that houses terrorists, white-collar criminals, and El Chapo. Prisoners are on a hunger strike after the second week of canceled visits due to staffing shortages. (NY Times)

Turns out a plan similar to governor Cuomo’s new L train non-shutdown was considered and rejected five years ago because of serious safety concerns. (NY Times)

He can decide the L train shutdown isn’t happening and declare emergency meetings of the MTA board, but Governor Cuomo still claims that he’s not in charge of the MTA. (Second Ave. Sagas)

The person handpicked by Mayor de Blasio to head up his BQX streetcar project left the United States for a new job in Saudi Arabia. (Politico)

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