The Briefly for August 8, 2019 – The “Boycotting Mega Rich Trump Supporters is Messy Business” Edition

How to research apartment buildings, One World Trade’s scent, stand-out dishes in the West Village, Cuomo tries to change the gun conversation and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

How should the city’s justice system fight gun violence? The NYPD and Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez have differing opinions, and no matter how difficult it is for them to see eye-to-eye on the matter, no one can ignore that shootings are up 10% and gun arrests are up 91% in Brooklyn. (NY Times)

It was a mass panic in Times Square as people fled for safety, storming bars or theaters, literally anywhere to escape what sounded like gunshots. It was a motorcycle backfiring. (NY Times)

You might be surprised how many playgrounds are built on top of cemeteries. (Untapped Cities)

On Wednesday, the outrage machine was aimed at Stephen Ross, the billionaire behind the Hudson Yards whose company owns Equinox, who is hosting a fundraiser for President Trump this weekend to the tune of a quarter-million dollars per person. People are calling on Equinox members to cancel their memberships, but if you’re looking to boycott businesses Ross has investments in, you better make a list, because it starts with SoulCycle, Momofuku, Milk Bar, &pizza, Beyond Sushi, and Bluestone Lane before you get into the companies his company invested in. When it comes to the mega-rich, boycotting is a messy business. (Eater)

Interested in finding out who you know that donated to Trump? Here’s an easy set of instructions to follow to make family gatherings really awkward this year. (Splinter)

Now that the primary is officially over, Melinda Katz is focused on the Queens DA election. (amNY)

If we’ve learned anything from the Katz/Cabán DA primary battle, it is that all votes count in NYC and everyone has to be extremely careful to make sure they fill out their ballots, affidavit or not, properly. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is attempting to shape the Democratic Primary by asking all candidates to endorse a list of gun reforms including banning assault weapons, creating a database to prevent the mentally ill from purchasing weapons, expanding buybacks, and “red flag” legislation that would allow individuals to seek court orders preventing others from buying guns. (Politico)

After a brief suspension, @placardabuse is back on Twitter, documenting all the different ways that cars with parking placards regularly abuse the privileges their placards may grant them. (Streetsblog)

12 stand-out dishes to try in the West Village. (Eater)

Where does the water go when you flush? Easy question, complex answer. (amNY)

One World Trade’s observatory has a scent, and it’s there on purpose. (NY Times)

How to research a building before you move in. You don’t want the reason that two-bedroom apartment is cheap to be because of the awful history of bedbug infestations. (Curbed)

An interview with State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, Brooklyn’s last standing elected Republican. She’s running for Congress to try to unseat Max Rose, possibly leaving the entire borough solidly blue in the process. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The Sunshine Cinema building on the Lower East Side has been completely demolished. (Curbed)

The woman who was arrested and had her one-year-old son pulled out of her hands for sitting on the floor at a benefits office has, as expected, sued the city, the officers involved, the HRA and the NYPD. (Politico)

The city’s taxi regulators voted to approve the cap on ride-hailing app vehicles and limited how long drivers can wait for fares in Manhattan. In six months, the commission will evaluate if they should issue new licenses. (Patch)

Finding a pool table at a bar is getting more and rarer, but the tables are far from gone. (amNY)

Last week a judge recommended Daniel Pantaleo be fired for using an illegal chokehold that lead to Eric Garner’s death. One week later the protests have begun as the mayor has remained silent and the city waits for action from commissioner James O’Neill. (amNY)

The DOT announced a speed-up in the timeline for installing protected bike lanes on 4th Ave in Brooklyn, connecting Bay Ridge to Park Slope and will do so by the end of this year. While the city will never get Em Samolewicz back after she was killed by a driver in Sunset Park, her death isn’t going without action from the city to protect other cyclists from meeting the same fate. (Curbed)

A fund to honor Em at Third Root Community Health Center is being established that will welcome trans women & trans femmes to receive healing services from Third Root at no cost. Em was an admin staff member since 2016. (GoFundMe)

A farm? On Staten Island? Yes, and it’s part of the amenities. (The Real Deal)

Raising the minimum wage for restaurant workers hasn’t hurt the restaurant industry as a whole, despite protests to the contrary every time it’s proposed. (amNY)

A group of rent-stabilized tenants in the Lower East Side and Williamsburg are accusing their landlord of continuing with eviction harassment, illegal overcharges, and preferential rent hikes—despite New York’s recently passed rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

Thousands of children, parents and staff members from the Harlem Children’s Zone marched in this year’s Children’s March for Peace. The match started after an elementary school girl was hit with a stray bullet inside her apartment 25 years ago and with the recent rise in gun violence across the city and country, its message is needed more than ever. (amNY)

The mayor announced $9 million to revitalize social services in Brownsville in response to the recent mass shooting for anti-gun violence programs, to enhance response times from the Brooklyn Action Center, youth education programs, to hire more staff for the recreation center, and more. Last week Jumaane Williams called for more funding and not police to address future problems in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

The 12 hottest lunch spots right now. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 22, 2019 – The “A Neighborhood Watch to Protect Against the Government” Edition

Another heatwave and another weekend of failures from ConEd, Friday’s subway glitch, good places for martinis, how to get a bike lane, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subways are looking pretty bleak this week. The 2 and 3 are borked, the 7 isn’t running in Manhattan, the L isn’t servicing most of Brooklyn, and the rest isn’t great either. (Subway Weekender)

Friday’s subway “glitch” that suspended the shuttle and every numbered train except the 7 was caused by a problem that was previously flagged and has been causing hundreds of delays since June. The MTA lost the ability to see where the trains were in their system and shut down every affected line. (amNY)

Photos of New Yorkers who dared face and possibly beat the heat. (NY Times)

Inside the neighborhood watch against ICE in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

ConEd was ready to provide “safe and reliable service through the weekend.” (amNY)

After a weekend of punishing weather, it looks like we’re headed towards highs in the 80s this week. Perfect weather for John Trivialta at Parklife this Wednesday! (amNY)

ConEd’s took a dump this weekend, with multiple outages across the city due to the heat. (NY Times)

This was before ConEd cut power to 30,000 in Brooklyn in order to make heat-related repairs. In an attempt to assist ConEd, Governor Cuomo sent state troopers, generators and light towers to the affected neighborhoods. The governor is also widening the investigation into last weekend’s power outage to include this weekend’s outages as well. (amNY)

A Times reporter decided to start delivering burritos for a story and, get this, he found out that it’s a demanding job! (NY Times)

Back in March Anthony Comello shot “Franky Boy” Cali in Staten Island. In court, his lawyer says he was trying to help the president by arresting him for being part of the “deep state.” (NY Times)

Video: Meet Andrew Cote, president of the New York Beekeepers Association. (Viewing NYC)

New York hasn’t changed much over the years, and this aerial photo from 1931 shows it. (r/newyorkcity)

Landlord Zev Pollak is being sued for telling African-Americans that he maintains a “Jewish building” in Midwood. According to the lawsuit, Zev Pollak’s “blatant and repeated conduct in violation of this fundamental American principle of equality is shocking and must end.” (The Real Deal)

The newest cheap-snack-turned-expensive-appetizer craze in the city is the french onion dip. (Eater)

Is Whole Foods overcharging for weight differences in their pre-packaged foods? According to a judge, the answer is no. (Gothamist)

Where did all that water come from that flooded a subway station in Queens on Wednesday of last week? Blame the Skyline Tower construction site. (6sqft)

Russian Doll was nominated for 13 Emmy awards, and in celebration of the nominations and the coming second season, take a look at some of the filming locations of the first season. (Untapped Cities)

You never know what you’ll find at a house clearance sale. Archivists found CDs with 2,400 photos of the aftermath of 9/11, taken by what is assumed to be a construction worker. The photographer hasn’t been identified, but all the photos have been uploaded to Flickr. If you are sensitive to photos from 9/11, avoid this link. (BBC)

International Lou Reed Tai Chi Day is being celebrated at the Brooklyn Public Library’s central branch on August 3. This isn’t a random choice, Lou Reed practiced Tai Chi for over three decades. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Lyft added subway directions to its app in an arms race with Uber to be the one transit app to rule them all. (Engadget)

End the “what’s a drive-in?” conversations with a trip to “Drive-In Movies at the Mount,” a pop-up drive-in in Staten Island on Friday nights. The fare is more family-friendly than horror, terror, and monsters. (Gothamist)

Sometimes you forget that the city is full of animals, other times you see a hawk in McCarren park eating a rodent. (Greenpointers)

Did you take a dip in a city fountain this weekend? It’s not illegal! At one point, the fountain in Washington Square Park was a pool.

DEA agents uncovered a heroin mill in the Bronx with over $5 million of heroin seized. Three people were arrested. (Patch)

Drinking gin and going down a slide. Carefully. (Time Out)

Want to learn more about the city’s history? Here are some great book picks from reporters. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here’s how to get a bike lane in your neighborhood. (Gothamist)

A February fire in the Metropolitan Detention Center caused a blackout during one of the coldest points of the year. This weekend, another fire caused panic inside the federal jail. (Gothamist)

When the Barclays Center was conceived, the developers promised 400 indoor parking spaces for bikes. A decade later that promise is officially broken. (Streetsblog)

227 Duffield Street in Downtown Brooklyn is an unassuming structure, but there are hints that it was once a part of the Underground Railroad, but no concrete proof. Politicians and advocates are calling on the Landmarks Preservation Commission to designate the location as a landmark as a way around a demolition permit granted by the city. (Gothamist)

Where to go when you want a good martini. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to @munnybuns for today’s photo!

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for July 16, 2019 – The “No One Knows What Caused the Blackout” Edition

ConEd is not untouchable, the Queens DA race is giving Bush v Gore vibes, the best restaurants in the East Village, the ice cream wars of Dumbo have begun, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Deep below the Flatiron Building, there’s an unused coal-fueled power plant that pre-dates the building’s steam systems. You probably will never get a personal tour of it, so experiencing it through this photo gallery is the closest you’ll get. (Untapped Cities)

The pizza wars of Dumbo continue on, but the ice cream war between Ample Hills and the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory are only just beginning. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Want to prepare for the next (inevitable) blackout? Here’s a list of six things you can do to get yourself ready. (Curbed)

Why are so many of the escalators in the new Q train subway stations broken so often? Don’t ask the MTA, because they can’t figure it out. (amNY)

Put ConEd down in the same category as the MTA, because they can’t seem to get their story straight about what caused this blackout. (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo appears to be sick of ConEd’s shit between this outage, the fire in Astoria that lit the sky, and transformer fires in Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn, and he’s open to replacing them. (Gothamist)

How has ConEd responded to this massive outage? By making a public statement that the heat this week could cause more outages. Lovely. (Huff Post)

The cost of the blackout was $3.5 on Broadway alone, with 26 of 30 possible performances being canceled. Saturday in July is Broadway’s most popular night in the most popular month. (NY Times)

A brief history of blackouts in New York City. (amNY)

The NYPD won’t share details about an off-duty Queens cop who was arrested on charges of false imprisonment and assault, calling it a “confidential investigation” while flagrantly showing the NYPD’s “fundamental and pervasive lack of transparency,” as cited in a report earlier this year. (Gothamist)

From romantic to the club to sporty to outdoors: where to go for date night in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

Staten Island politicians are urging the governor to start a “microtransit” pilot program to expand transit options throughout the city’s largest borough. Microtransit refers to buses and not alternative modes of transportation, as Staten Island remains a borough without any bike lanes. (Curbed)

With Jeff Bezos buying a Manhattan apartment, protestors of Amazon have a new target to make their voices heard. (Patch)

It seemed the public call for volunteers worked, the Giglio Lift went off without a hitch last weekend, which is the largest of the lifts during Williamsburg’s Giglio Feast. The feast continues through the weekend with more lifts on Wednesday and Sunday nights. (Gothamist)

There is a fight for survival happening all around us, as invasive species are threatening the city’s flora. The problem is only a biodiversity one, but fighting invasive bugs and plants can be costly. The treatment and removal of ash trees due to a beetle infestation will cost the city nearly $10 million over three years. (amNY)

What’s the latest on the Mandarin Duck? He seems to have left the city a few months ago and we should expect him back after the summer. Ducks molt in the summer and while they’re flightless they look for safer and more private bodies of water. (Gothamist)

Residents of the financial district are trying to get the city to pump the brakes before construction begins on the last building in the World Trade Center in an attempt to keep the project selection process fair and to ensure the neighborhood benefits from another massive construction project. (amNY)

Photos from the Queens DA primary recount is giving off major Bush v Gore vibes. (NY Times)

The next expansions of CitiBike’s coverage will be painfully slow. The current roll-out will take until 2023– the service’s decade anniversary– to complete. (Streetsblog)

The statue outside of the Museum of Natural History of Teddy Roosevelt atop a horse, flanked by an African-American and a Native American was one of the monuments the city was reconsidered in 2017. The statue has attracted negative attention for Roosevelt’s racist views and statements about Native Americans and Africans and has been the target of protest multiple times since installation in 1940. The museum is leaning into controversy by highlighting the criticism of the statue and of the museum’s history to complicate and contextualize without glorification. (NY Times)

The best restaurants in the East Village. (The infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.