The Briefly for June 25, 2020 – The “Beaches Will Open on July 1” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: 23 more miles of open streets, the best and worst of takeout and delivery, the MTA moves to stop all construction projects, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 84˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

It took the threat of the City Council forcing his hand, but Mayor de Blasio announced the city’s beaches will fully open on July 1. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Anyone traveling to New York, New Jersey, or Connecticut from states with Covid-19 outbreaks must undergo a 14-day isolation period under threat of fines that range from $2,000 to $10,000. It was announced at noon on Wednesday and went into effect at midnight. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The New York Marathon was canceled for 2020 and hopes to return in 2021. (Joe Patorno for amNewYork Metro)

The best and worst of NYC takeout and delivery. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

10 hiking trails in the city to try this summer. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A spokesperson for New York City’s largest charter network resigned in protest, stating she can no longer defend Success Academy’s “racist and abusive practices” that are “detrimental to the emotional well being” of its students. (Alex Zimmerman for ChalkBeat)

New York is one of three states that is “close” to containing the coronavirus, according to the group Covid Act Now. New Jersey and Massachusetts are the other two. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The MTA is exploring the idea of using artificial intelligence to track how many subway riders are wearing face masks. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The MTA, being the MTA, is stopped all planned upgrades to subways and installing new elevators because of its financial situation. Nothing says “planning for the future” like “no updates to an already crumbling system.” Some of these repairs include bringing subway stations into compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, structural repairs to the 7 line, which was falling apart in Queens before the pandemic, and updating the signals on the A/C/E lines. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Say hello to the idea of the Queens Ribbon, a proposed new bridge that would like Long Island City, Roosevelt Island, and Midtown Manhattan for pedestrians and cyclists. (Winnie Hu for NY Times)

Major League Baseball agreed with the players union and “spring” training starts on July 1 for a 60 game season that will start on July 23 or 24. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The Stonewall Inn is facing an “uncertain future” and started up a second GoFundMe to raise $100,000. Their first GoFundMe is for the staff. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Farewell to the Times Square McDonalds after 17 years. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

The Times throws some cold water on the fireworks conspiracies. Phantom Fireworks, one of the largest warehouses in PA is running a buy-one-get-two-free sale. (Mihir Zaveri, Allie Conti and Sandra E. Garcia for NY Times)

The percentages of Black members of the NYPD have grown among captains or above and lieutenants, but the percentage of Black officers has fallen since 2008 among sergeants, detectives, and patrol officers. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

A look at NYPD’s use of helicopters for intimidation and surveillance during George Floyd protests, occasionally flying only 100 over sea level. Each helicopter is equipped with infrared cameras and a laptop that can zoom in on individual faces. The FAA recommends helicopters fly at an altitude of 1,0000 at the lowest. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

A new study from The Health Department shows the city underreported NYPD-related deaths, including a dozen deaths of unarmed people of color over five years. Between 2010 and 2015, the number was reported as 46, but research shows identified 105 deaths. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

When an NYPD SUV drove into a group of protesters, NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea says they didn’t violate policy and they came out with “no injuries to anyone.” (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

“Last Halloween, my wife and then-6-year-old daughter were making their way home after trick-or-treating in Brooklyn. Suddenly, an unmarked NYPD car with sirens wailing began speeding against traffic up a one-way street, our neighborhood’s main thoroughfare. The officer seemed to be going after a few teenage boys.

Then, in an instant, the car hit one of the kids.”
-Eric Umansky for ProPublica, My Family Saw a Police Car Hit a Kid on Halloween. Then I Learned How NYPD Impunity Works.

Starting Tuesday night, activists have occupied City Hall Park with a plan to stay through the end of the month, calling for a reduction in the NYPD’s budget by $1 billion. (Sydney Pereira and Scott Heins for Gothamist)

The city will paint a Black Lives Matter mural on the street in front of Trump Tower. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Photos: The history of the Dyke March. (Donna Aceto for Gay City News)

New York City does not plan to offer in-person classes this summer for students with disabilities. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

Mayor de Blasio announced 23 miles of new open streets, including nine miles of temporarily protected bike lanes. It brings the total milage to 67, short of his promise to open 100 miles by the end of this month. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The mayor announced the city might have to lay off or furlough 22,000 municipal workers this fall to help close the city’s budget gap. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

After another mess of an election day in NYC, there is another round of calls to reform how we vote to make elections more inclusive and fair. (Toss Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

If you’re planning on doing outdoor dining, check ahead to see if you’ll need reservations. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

10 excellent places for takeout in Queens. (Joe DeStefano for Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Ryan for sending in today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 27, 2019 – The “If the City is One Big Mall, Are We All Mallrats?” Edition

Tiffany Cabán’s victory in Queens, The New Museum outlines its expansion, the MTA takes a dump on the morning commute and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Public defender Tiffany Cabán won the election for Queens DA, despite Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s unwillingness to concede for many hours. (amNY)

Tiffany Cabán’s victory, aided by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, was another failure of the Quens Democratic establishment as the borough continues to push even further to the left. (Politico)

Five things to know about Tiffany Cabán. (NY Times)

20 things Tiffany Cabán promised to do if elected as Queens DA, including declining to prosecute many non-violent crimes, change the charge standard for misdemeanors, hold the NYPD accountable, decriminalize marijuana, and more. (Gotham Gazette)

Councilwoman Farah Louis won her primary to all but secure the 45th District City Council seat, formerly held by Jumaane Williams. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York City isn’t becoming a mall. We’ve been in denial long enough, it’s time admit that New York City is a mall. All of the “retail hubs” like the ones at the World Trade Center, Essex Crossing, PIer 17, and the Hudson Yards? They’re all malls. (Curbed)

The 10 oldest churches in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

Those bus signs with the timers in them are great, except that 20% of them don’t work. (The City)

The Yankees are honoring the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots with a plaque in Monument Park. This isn’t the first non-Yankee plaque, with others honoring Nelson Mandela, the victims and rescue workers of 9/11, and popes Paul VI, John Paul II, and Benedict XVI. (Huff Post)

The Rent Guidelines Board approved rent increases of 1.5% for one-year leases and 2.5% for two-year leases for rent-stabilized apartments. (Gothamist)

19 fantastic LGBTQ bars in New York City. (Eater)

How to dress for a New York summer, from costume designer Luca Mosca, who happens to be John Wick’s tailor. (Gothamist)

Can you imagine the burden of always being right? There have been nearly 2,500 complaints of racial bias in the city since 2014 and the NYPD has not investigated a single one because the department hasn’t found anything wrong. (Gothamist)

The MTA Board is looking to ban repeat criminals from using the subway. Is it possible? “We can’t ban anyone right now and we won’t be able to.” Good thing the board is tackling the most important things first. (Patch)

The B, D, and F had awful mornings on Tuesday, with some trains sitting with closed doors for 45 minutes. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo, who says he doesn’t control the MTA, directed the MTA to create a task force to examine speed across the entire subway system, MetroNorth and the LIRR. (Politico)

40 years is a lot to do anything, which makes Peter Tsoumas’s run selling flowers at the First Ave L train station monumental. He has his first six months of retirement planned. After that, he’s open for suggestions. (Bedford + Bowery)

Step inside The Bureau of General Services — Queer Division, the bookstore on the second floor of The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Community Center on W 13th. (amNY)

A-Rod is slowly trying to become the A-Rod of NYC real estate with a plan to purchase multiple multi-family homes in the city. (6sqft)

Employment in Lower Manhattan has reached pre-9/11 levels for the first time since the attacks, according to the Alliance for Downtown New York. (Chelsea Now)

An updated list of what art galleries to see right now. (NY Times)

The man who gave us I Heart NY was Milton Glaser, a New Yorker from the East Village. Another piece of work from Glaser is the murals of the Astor Place station. (GVSHP)

New York’s richest person shouldn’t surprise you. (Patch)

You’ll find Fredd E. “Tree” Sequoia behind the bar of the Stonewall Inn, the same man who was behind the bar on June 28, 1969. (amNY)

It’s been a years-long fight, but the Elizabeth Street Garden in Nolita will become affordable housing for seniors after approval from the city council. (Curbed)

Perry Rosen is one of Brooklyn’s last jukebox and pinball repairmen. (Viewing NYC)

Despite rejection by the community board and objection from Staten Island Borough President Jimmy Oddo, Staten Island’s Bay Street’s rezoning was approved by the city council, guaranteeing to change the neighborhood. (Curbed)

The Islanders will continue to split their home games between Long Island and the Barclays Center, being in the unique position to disappoint multiple crowds throughout the season. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The New Museum revealed its plans for its 2022 expansion. (EV Grieve)

With the state’s 2019 legislative session over, what’s next for Democrats in 2020? (Politico)

Where to Eat and Drink in Dumbo. (Eater)

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The Briefly for June 17, 2019 – The “New York State is Stepping Up Where the City Failed” Edition

Cameras are in OMNY scanners, the smallest island in the city, the “Tombs Angel”, the secrets of NYU and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway service changes are fairly busy, with cuts and changes along the 1, 4, 5, 7, A, D, E, F, and N lines. (Subway Weekender)

First person memories from the police raid that led to the Stonewall Inn riot. (NY Times)

The top ten secrets of NYU. Not a secret? People who graduated from NYU, because they’ll tell you any opportunity they get. (Untapped Cities)

It should surprise no one, but we’re hitting peak season to eat out in New York. (Eater)

Remember that company putting LED billboards on the city’s waterways? The state’s legislature has a bill that would ban them completely, taking an action that the city’s government seemed unable to do. (Gothamist)

The rent reform bills, only an agreement early last week, were will be challenged in court by landlords. (Curbed)

Here’s what the rent reforms mean for market-rate tenants. (Gothamist)

How will the state’s rent reform impact the Bronx? (Norwood News)

The five men who stabbed 15-year-old Lesandro Guzman-Feliz to death nearly a year ago were found guilty of first and second-degree murder, conspiracy, and gang assault. They will be sentenced July 16. (amNY)

Ever wonder how you get a pool onto the roof of a 68-story building? You can watch Brooklyn Point’s infinity pool, the highest infinity pool in the western hemisphere, being brought up 680 feet in the air. (6sqft)

As a part of Penn Station’s renovations, the mainstay bar Tracks will be forced to close at the end of August along with McDonalds, Jamba Juice, and a few others. The work is expected to finish in 2022. (Gothamist)

After being lost in storage and nearly forgotten, a monument to Rebecca Salamone Foster is ready to be unveiled this month in the state’s supreme courthouse. Foster was known as the “Tombs Angel” from her work at “the Tombs” city jail in lower Manhattan. The Tombs, to quote Dickens “would bring disgrace to the most despotic empire in the world.” (NY Times)

We’re down to the wire for the state legislature’s session. Still on the docket is drivers licenses for undocumented immigrants, which has strong support, and the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana. Legalization has seen a slight resurgence in support, with pockets of resistance on Long Island and arguments about taxes across the board. (amNY)

“With the first hot nights in June police despatches, that record the killing of men and women by rolling off roofs and window-sills while asleep, announce that the time of greatest suffering among the poor is at hand” From Jacob Riis’s How the Other Half Lives, emphasize the hell of summer in the Lower East Side’s tenements. (Ephemeral New York)

The 2021 mayoral race is already on the mind of likely candidates and Corey Johnson just passed a bill that will impact that election’s campaign donations and benefit him directly, which is a hard pill to swallow for his potential opponents. (Gotham Gazette)

Last week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including Beach 97th St’s La Barracuda, which joined the hundred point club. (Patch)

If you’ve got the upper-body strength, you can help keep The Giglio lift tradition alive in Williamsburg during the Giglio Feast, a tradition since 1903. (Gothamist)

A look at U Thant Island, the smallest island in New York City. (Viewing NYC)

The city has reached a deal on a budget for the 2020 fiscal year. At $92.8, the budget is the largest in history and 4% larger than last year’s budget, with funding increases for social workers, libraries, parks, and abortion services. (Gothamist)

Five takeaways from the city’s budget deal. (NY Times)

.00025% of the city’s budgets, $250,000, was set aside to provide access to safe and legal abortion services, with one-third of that going towards those traveling from out-of-state. The Abortion Access Fund offers assessments within a 24-hour period and also provides referrals to groups that cover transportation costs. (Jezebel)

Photos from The High Line Hat Party, which is as ridiculous as it sounds. (Gothamist)
http://gothamist.com/2019/06/14/high_line_hat_party_2019_photos.php

BAM employees have voted in favor of unionizing. (Hyperallergic)

Brooklyn Academy of Music Employees Vote in Favor of Union

The OMNY scanners are convenient, and there’s a camera built into them with infrared capabilities. The cameras were conveniently left out of OMNY’s privacy policy. (Gothamist)

New York sports 11 of the top 100 restaurants in the country that “incorporate wine in thoughtful and exciting ways.” (Patch)

From the city’ best cannolis at Madonia Borhters to fresh pasta at Borgatti’s Ravioli and Egg Noodles: A walking tour along Arthur Avenue, the Bronx’s Little Italy. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.