The Briefly for June 27, 2019 – The “If the City is One Big Mall, Are We All Mallrats?” Edition

Tiffany Cabán’s victory in Queens, The New Museum outlines its expansion, the MTA takes a dump on the morning commute and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Public defender Tiffany Cabán won the election for Queens DA, despite Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s unwillingness to concede for many hours. (amNY)

Tiffany Cabán’s victory, aided by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, was another failure of the Quens Democratic establishment as the borough continues to push even further to the left. (Politico)

Five things to know about Tiffany Cabán. (NY Times)

20 things Tiffany Cabán promised to do if elected as Queens DA, including declining to prosecute many non-violent crimes, change the charge standard for misdemeanors, hold the NYPD accountable, decriminalize marijuana, and more. (Gotham Gazette)

Councilwoman Farah Louis won her primary to all but secure the 45th District City Council seat, formerly held by Jumaane Williams. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York City isn’t becoming a mall. We’ve been in denial long enough, it’s time admit that New York City is a mall. All of the “retail hubs” like the ones at the World Trade Center, Essex Crossing, PIer 17, and the Hudson Yards? They’re all malls. (Curbed)

The 10 oldest churches in NYC. (Untapped Cities)

Those bus signs with the timers in them are great, except that 20% of them don’t work. (The City)

The Yankees are honoring the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots with a plaque in Monument Park. This isn’t the first non-Yankee plaque, with others honoring Nelson Mandela, the victims and rescue workers of 9/11, and popes Paul VI, John Paul II, and Benedict XVI. (Huff Post)

The Rent Guidelines Board approved rent increases of 1.5% for one-year leases and 2.5% for two-year leases for rent-stabilized apartments. (Gothamist)

19 fantastic LGBTQ bars in New York City. (Eater)

How to dress for a New York summer, from costume designer Luca Mosca, who happens to be John Wick’s tailor. (Gothamist)

Can you imagine the burden of always being right? There have been nearly 2,500 complaints of racial bias in the city since 2014 and the NYPD has not investigated a single one because the department hasn’t found anything wrong. (Gothamist)

The MTA Board is looking to ban repeat criminals from using the subway. Is it possible? “We can’t ban anyone right now and we won’t be able to.” Good thing the board is tackling the most important things first. (Patch)

The B, D, and F had awful mornings on Tuesday, with some trains sitting with closed doors for 45 minutes. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo, who says he doesn’t control the MTA, directed the MTA to create a task force to examine speed across the entire subway system, MetroNorth and the LIRR. (Politico)

40 years is a lot to do anything, which makes Peter Tsoumas’s run selling flowers at the First Ave L train station monumental. He has his first six months of retirement planned. After that, he’s open for suggestions. (Bedford + Bowery)

Step inside The Bureau of General Services — Queer Division, the bookstore on the second floor of The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Community Center on W 13th. (amNY)

A-Rod is slowly trying to become the A-Rod of NYC real estate with a plan to purchase multiple multi-family homes in the city. (6sqft)

Employment in Lower Manhattan has reached pre-9/11 levels for the first time since the attacks, according to the Alliance for Downtown New York. (Chelsea Now)

An updated list of what art galleries to see right now. (NY Times)

The man who gave us I Heart NY was Milton Glaser, a New Yorker from the East Village. Another piece of work from Glaser is the murals of the Astor Place station. (GVSHP)

New York’s richest person shouldn’t surprise you. (Patch)

You’ll find Fredd E. “Tree” Sequoia behind the bar of the Stonewall Inn, the same man who was behind the bar on June 28, 1969. (amNY)

It’s been a years-long fight, but the Elizabeth Street Garden in Nolita will become affordable housing for seniors after approval from the city council. (Curbed)

Perry Rosen is one of Brooklyn’s last jukebox and pinball repairmen. (Viewing NYC)

Despite rejection by the community board and objection from Staten Island Borough President Jimmy Oddo, Staten Island’s Bay Street’s rezoning was approved by the city council, guaranteeing to change the neighborhood. (Curbed)

The Islanders will continue to split their home games between Long Island and the Barclays Center, being in the unique position to disappoint multiple crowds throughout the season. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The New Museum revealed its plans for its 2022 expansion. (EV Grieve)

With the state’s 2019 legislative session over, what’s next for Democrats in 2020? (Politico)

Where to Eat and Drink in Dumbo. (Eater)

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The Briefly for June 17, 2019 – The “New York State is Stepping Up Where the City Failed” Edition

Cameras are in OMNY scanners, the smallest island in the city, the “Tombs Angel”, the secrets of NYU and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway service changes are fairly busy, with cuts and changes along the 1, 4, 5, 7, A, D, E, F, and N lines. (Subway Weekender)

First person memories from the police raid that led to the Stonewall Inn riot. (NY Times)

The top ten secrets of NYU. Not a secret? People who graduated from NYU, because they’ll tell you any opportunity they get. (Untapped Cities)

It should surprise no one, but we’re hitting peak season to eat out in New York. (Eater)

Remember that company putting LED billboards on the city’s waterways? The state’s legislature has a bill that would ban them completely, taking an action that the city’s government seemed unable to do. (Gothamist)

The rent reform bills, only an agreement early last week, were will be challenged in court by landlords. (Curbed)

Here’s what the rent reforms mean for market-rate tenants. (Gothamist)

How will the state’s rent reform impact the Bronx? (Norwood News)

The five men who stabbed 15-year-old Lesandro Guzman-Feliz to death nearly a year ago were found guilty of first and second-degree murder, conspiracy, and gang assault. They will be sentenced July 16. (amNY)

Ever wonder how you get a pool onto the roof of a 68-story building? You can watch Brooklyn Point’s infinity pool, the highest infinity pool in the western hemisphere, being brought up 680 feet in the air. (6sqft)

As a part of Penn Station’s renovations, the mainstay bar Tracks will be forced to close at the end of August along with McDonalds, Jamba Juice, and a few others. The work is expected to finish in 2022. (Gothamist)

After being lost in storage and nearly forgotten, a monument to Rebecca Salamone Foster is ready to be unveiled this month in the state’s supreme courthouse. Foster was known as the “Tombs Angel” from her work at “the Tombs” city jail in lower Manhattan. The Tombs, to quote Dickens “would bring disgrace to the most despotic empire in the world.” (NY Times)

We’re down to the wire for the state legislature’s session. Still on the docket is drivers licenses for undocumented immigrants, which has strong support, and the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana. Legalization has seen a slight resurgence in support, with pockets of resistance on Long Island and arguments about taxes across the board. (amNY)

“With the first hot nights in June police despatches, that record the killing of men and women by rolling off roofs and window-sills while asleep, announce that the time of greatest suffering among the poor is at hand” From Jacob Riis’s How the Other Half Lives, emphasize the hell of summer in the Lower East Side’s tenements. (Ephemeral New York)

The 2021 mayoral race is already on the mind of likely candidates and Corey Johnson just passed a bill that will impact that election’s campaign donations and benefit him directly, which is a hard pill to swallow for his potential opponents. (Gotham Gazette)

Last week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including Beach 97th St’s La Barracuda, which joined the hundred point club. (Patch)

If you’ve got the upper-body strength, you can help keep The Giglio lift tradition alive in Williamsburg during the Giglio Feast, a tradition since 1903. (Gothamist)

A look at U Thant Island, the smallest island in New York City. (Viewing NYC)

The city has reached a deal on a budget for the 2020 fiscal year. At $92.8, the budget is the largest in history and 4% larger than last year’s budget, with funding increases for social workers, libraries, parks, and abortion services. (Gothamist)

Five takeaways from the city’s budget deal. (NY Times)

.00025% of the city’s budgets, $250,000, was set aside to provide access to safe and legal abortion services, with one-third of that going towards those traveling from out-of-state. The Abortion Access Fund offers assessments within a 24-hour period and also provides referrals to groups that cover transportation costs. (Jezebel)

Photos from The High Line Hat Party, which is as ridiculous as it sounds. (Gothamist)
http://gothamist.com/2019/06/14/high_line_hat_party_2019_photos.php

BAM employees have voted in favor of unionizing. (Hyperallergic)

Brooklyn Academy of Music Employees Vote in Favor of Union

The OMNY scanners are convenient, and there’s a camera built into them with infrared capabilities. The cameras were conveniently left out of OMNY’s privacy policy. (Gothamist)

New York sports 11 of the top 100 restaurants in the country that “incorporate wine in thoughtful and exciting ways.” (Patch)

From the city’ best cannolis at Madonia Borhters to fresh pasta at Borgatti’s Ravioli and Egg Noodles: A walking tour along Arthur Avenue, the Bronx’s Little Italy. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 31, 2019 – The “Stuyshwick? This is a Joke, Right?” Edition

The weekend subways, the NYPD has been lying to the public about rape numbers, a look at the art in the echoes of the Stonewall Inn riots, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The weekend subway disruptions have been pretty light for the last few weeks. That ends this weekend with 13 different subway lines carrying some variety of change in service to kick off June. (Subway Weekender)

The NYPD has been lying to the public for years about the number of rapes committed in NYC. While telling the public there were 6,626 rapes in a four and a half year span, they told federal officials there were 10,649 rapes. What the hell is going on with the 38% discrepancy? The NYPD only reports vaginal penetration as rape, not anal or oral. This would preclude the inclusion of any rape committed against men from this number. With this uncertainty, the one thing that is clear is that the NYPD is setting itself to fail when it comes to cases of rape in the city. (Gothamist)

Oh god. Someone is sincerely trying to make Stuyshwick a thing (where Bushwick and Bed-Stuy meet on Broadway under the J train). Anyway, here’s a “guide” to the “neighborhood.” (Grub Street)

Whoever thought of this moronic name should look back to 2013, when BEDWICK topped Time Out’s list of the dumbest fake neighborhood names. (Time Out)

After nearly a decade in the making, a pedestrian bridge replacing the Rector Street bridge finally open this fall. (Curbed)

Seven places to celebrate the 200th birthday of Walt Whitman today. (Untapped Cities)

The City Council approved two bills aimed at making streets safer. One will hold the DOT accountable to add safety design elements to any street being redesigned and the second would require any contractors to create temporary bike lanes when disrupting any pre-existing lanes. (Curbed)

Brooklyn’s Community Board 9 appears to be on the verge of falling apart, as the search to fill the empty since 2015 role of district manager was about to be debated, three board members staged a walkout. The walkout resulted in less than a quorum, ending the meeting immediately. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Everyone wants a say in the Gowanus rezoning, the latest voice to want a seat at the table is the EPA. (Curbed)

The beginning of the end of the MetroCard officially begins today. (Gothamist)

If you’re confronted with an OMNY screen, here’s how to use your phone to pay for your subway ride. Until it is available at every station you can only pay per ride. (Patch)

You’ve probably heard that the city’s water is the cleanest of anywhere in the state. It’s not a rumor. It’s the truth. (Patch)

A look inside the $5.5 million makeover of Central Park’s SummerStage. (amNY)

Brace yourself, this one’s got a sad ending. The eight-month-old puppy who escaped his harness and jumped down onto the subway tracks at Herald Square was found dead near where he first escaped. Marley’s human companions are blaming the MTA. (Gothamist)

Seventeen years after the cleanup of Ground Zero was completed, a modest ceremony was held at the new Memorial Glade dedicated to the people whose related illnesses and deaths have followed in the subsequent years. (NY Times)

Following yesterday’s assessment of how NYU and Columbia’s neighborhoods are fresh hell when it comes to renting, here are the most affordable neighborhoods for fresh college graduates. (Curbed)

It’s the city’s fanciest McDonald’s, three stories tall, walls of glass, and open 24 hours a day. (Eater)

“Tastes of Brooklyn” is coming to Crown Heights’ Franklin Ave this Sunday, a street that inspired a joke of a podcast. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The city’s Lyft and Uber cars cause more pollution than cabs, thanks to the city’s hybrid fleet. The city’s 13,500 taxi emissions dropped 82% in 15 years. (Gizmodo)

Gravity knives are no longer illegal in New York. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Measles cases are at a 25 year high, with more than half of the nation’s cases being in the city. (NY Times)

The World Pride Mural Project Initiative has brought a new Buff Monster mural at the corner of Chrystie St & Broome St to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. (Brooklyn Street Art)

As we roll into June, the city’s streets, art galleries, and museums are focusing on the art centered on the riot/rebellion/resistance/uprising at the Stonewall Inn 50 years ago. The Times’ co-chief art critic looks at the historical significance that moment at the Stonewall Inn has had and how it has reverberated through art for half a century. (NY Times)

The BQX is such a pipe dream that advocates are pinning their hopes on a Democrat taking over the presidency in 2021 so the project has a remote chance of receiving the $1.3 billion necessary to cover just under half of the cost of the project. (Gothamist)

17 LGBTQ landmarks of Greenwich Village (6sqft)

Stolen: One orange bearded dragon. (Gothamist)

Behind the scene photos from Hart Island: The city’s mass burial ground. (Untapped Cities)

A guide to Jacob Riis Park Beach for the summer of 2019. (Gothamist)

Where to go on a Saturday when you want to do something but don’t have plans. (The Infatuation)

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