The Briefly for June 8, 2020 – The “I Guess This Is Phase One?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Phase one kicks off today, the mayor is forced to lift the city’s curfew early, the MTA’s plans for phase one, a protest of the mayor, and more

Are you absentee voting this month? (You should be absentee voting this month.) Here’s how to make sure your absentee vote counts. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

The absentee ballot deadline was extended to June 23. Get your application in now. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Here we go, phase one. Here’s what it means. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The mayor announced he would end the city’s curfew one day early because, according to him, there had been a night without violent protests. In the reality that the rest of us live in, a lawsuit from the NYCLU, the Legal Aid Society, the Thurgood Marchall Civil Rights Center, and the Center for Constitutional Rights were about to force the mayor to lift the curfew and three different district attorneys in the city refused to charge most protestors that were arrested. (Ali Tufan Koc and Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

A protest of the mayor is expected on Monday morning (or was expected, depending on when you read this) to push de Blasio into actually enacting police reforms. The march, which includes members of the mayor’s administration, isn’t organized by the same people who wrote the open letter tot he mayor, but it shows how unified the city is in its disgust over the mayor’s ability to talk a lot and do very little. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

As Minneapolis already has, activists are calling on the NYC Department of Education to cut ties with the NYPD. Chancellor Richard Carranza, appointed by the mayor, does not favor a “counselors not cops” approach to school safety. Since 2014 the school safety budget has increased by 25% and while the school budget for next year is decreasing under the budget already revealed by the mayor, the budget for safety is increasing. (Alex Zimmerman for The City)

What can the city do with the NYPD’s $6 billion? Quite a bit. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Thursday night’s NYPD ambush of peaceful protesters was, according to Commissioner Dermont Shea, “executed flawlessly.” It included beating and arresting legal observers, medics, pepper-spraying a pregnant woman, and featured Terence Monahan kneeling with protesters one moment and directing officers to arrest the protest’s leaders the next. The NYPD claimed that “interlopers” were to blame for the police violence but a video of what happened shows otherwise and the NYPD has yet to show any evidence of this. (Jake Offenhartz and Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A look at the NYPD’s strategy of “kettling” protestors, which shows a shift in police tactics towards aggression. Of course, the mayor has defended this practice, saying it is sometimes necessary for public safety. I’m not sure which public he’s referring to. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Does the name Terence Monahan ring a bell? It should because he was the person in charge of the city’s response to protesters during the 2004 GOP convention. In 2004 the protesters had been told they could march and were then arrested en masse. Charges were dismissed against all 227 arrested. The city later settling a lawsuit with the protesters for $18 million. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Terence Monahan has a legacy of brutality. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

Governor Cuomo announced a “Say Their Name” package of bills which would criminalize making a false race-based 911 call, ban chokeholds, revise 50-1 (unknown what this means), and assign the Attorney General an independent prosecutor for matters related to the death of unarmed citizens caused by law enforcement. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The state’s Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus has their own package of 13 bills they’ve unveiled which also adds mandates for body cameras for state and MTA police, establishes strangulation as a crime mandates medical attention for people under arrest, and more. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

We’re committed to seeing a shift of funding to youth services, to social services, that will happen literally in the course of the next three weeks, but I’m not going to go into detail because it is subject to negotiation and we want to figure out what makes sense.” -Mayor de Blasio, talking big, one more time. He says “literally in the course of the next three weeks” because it literally has to get done because of the city’s budget, not because he wants to enact reforms quickly. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Two NYPD officers were suspended for violence against protesters. One is the officer who pushed a woman to the ground and the other the officer who pulled down a protester’s face mask and pepper-sprayed him. Just two. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Next, suspend every cop who covered their badge number during the protests with the bullshit excuse of the covers being “mourning bands.” (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Photos: East Village storefronts show their support for Black Lives Matter. (EV Grieve)

In comparison, the award for “the shittiest tribute to victims of racial violence” goes to the Museum of Ice Cream’s “I Scream For…” painted boards. (Elie Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Returning to the subways today? Here’s what you need to know. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The MTA clearly has a plan for people who will be riding the subway. It may not be a perfect plan, but it’s a plan. The mayor? Come on, you know he doesn’t have a plan based in reality. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

“This week and going forward, you might notice some other helpful additions to your local station — like new hand sanitizer dispensers and new signs reminding you how to keep yourself safe. You’ll also see floor markings, floor decals, and new directions aimed at communicating with you clearly about how to safely move around our system.
-Sarah Feinberg, acting President of MTA New York City Transit for amNewyork Metro, MTA is glad to have you back for the NYC reopening

With June 8’s phase one reopening of the city, you might be asking a few questions that are closer to home, like “will my building’s gym/pool be opening soon?” Get ready for a complicated road back. (Joanne Kaufman for NY Times)

The city will begin testing sewage for Covid-19, to get an idea of how the virus is spreading hundreds or thousands of people at a time. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Governor Cuomo signed a bill into a law that will grant death benefits to Covid-19 frontline workers’ families. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

A peek into what remains of Park, a Chelsea restaurant that abruptly closed last year and appears to be slowly taken over by trees. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

If you’re like me, at this point in the summer you’d have ridden the Coney Island Cyclone multiple times. If you’ve been missing the anticipation of the climb of the first hill and the exhilaration of the drop, these 360° videos of the Cyclone and Thunderbolt are gonna be as close as we can get for a while. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Last Wednesday night the city’s known Covid-19 death toll hit 0 for the first time since March 12. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

James Bennet, who oversaw the editorial pages of the NY Times, is out. The paper blames it on “a significant breakdown of our editorial process” because of the Senator Tom Cotton editorial which promoted violence against protesters. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

RIP Kanela, a red-headed Siberian husky and the unofficial mascot of Welcome2TheBronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

In 1982, the MTA thought they could paint their cars brilliant white to prevent them from being spray painted. “The Great White Fleet” idea was as stupid as it sounds. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

A bit of news that passed by in the insanity that was Memorial Day weekend and every single day since then, the City Council banned the use of the terms “alien” and “illegal immigrant” on official city documents. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Central Park West’s mystery manhole cover. (Ephemeral New York)

Apartment Porn: A $3.5 million townhouse in Prospect Heights with outdoor space, amazing woodwork, and one of the most wildly-colored bathrooms I’ve ever seen. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A list of lists: A roundup of NYC’s Black-owned restaurant lists. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Thank you to reader Michael for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 17, 2020 – The “Every Hour is Happy Hour When Time is Meaningless” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city’s budget goes wartime, the best brunch options for delivery, high end stores are boarding up their windows, and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 51˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 41˚ High: 63˚

4K VIdeo: Walking through Times Square. (ActionKid)

In honor of his late grandmother, Michael Che will be paying May’s rent for the 160 apartments in the NYCHA building where she lived. (Ron Dicker for HuffPost)

Rent in the city dropped 6% since the start since March 22. (Localize.City)

Tenant groups are set for a rent strike on May 1. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Sick of sourdough? Here are seven bread options for you to try. (Sam O’Brien for Atlas Obscura)

The allure and anxiety of drinking along in quarantine. (Alice Feriring for Grub Street)

What time is it okay to start drinking alcohol? It’s hard to tell because time has no meaning anymore. (Shayla Love for VICE)

Slowly, the city’s government is finding a way to move forward. The City Council and the Landmarks Preservation Commission will start meeting digitally next week. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Taxi drivers were struggling before the pandemic. With COVID-19, they face even more difficulties. (Estefania Hernandez for NY1)

Are you willing to go to a live sport without a vaccine? 61% of sports fans and 71% of people overall are unwilling to go until there’s a vaccine. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Keith McNally’s Lucky Strike on Grand Street is closed for good. Is it the first domino to fall when it comes to independent restaurants? (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

From former Roberta’s and Speedy Romeo chef Robert Guimond comes Public Display of Affection, a wood-fired pizza spot in Park Slope on Union Street. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio released a revised “wartime” budget on Thursday, with a $6 billion reduction. “A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor when speaking about his budget. Last year he said, “Placard abuse erodes faith in government and has no place in our city.” This year he’s eliminating the Placard Abuse Enforcement Team. Activist Charles Komanoff has a different idea: Disband the Collision Investigation Squad instead. (Charles Komanoff for Streetsblog)

Workers at two luxury Manhattan residential buildings, The Chamberlain and 432 West 52nd Street, walked out on the job, claiming poor work conditions and harassment. (Sylvia Varnham O’Regan for The Real Deal)

It’s easy to think that artists should use this time to create something new, but the reality of the moment can be much heavier than imaginable. This is Rori Nogee’s story of going from having six jobs and a show ready to open on Restaurant Row to a 100% loss of income and opportunities. (Rori Nogee for New York Cliche)

A look at what might be New York City’s last open bookstore. (Hoa P Nguyen for Bedford + Bowery)

I first saw it from a friend’s story on Instagram, the boarded-up stores in Manhattan. It’s a pandemic, not The Purge. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Pizza bagels? Pizza rolls? Please. Forget it, now pizza cupcakes are ready for delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Tired of the same old views? Check out the livestreams of the Bronx Zoo and the New York Aquarium. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

“It should be stated bluntly that traveling on the New York subway system is now one of the more frightful experiences Western civilization has to offer on a regular basis. The experience is not only intolerable. It is also a daily advertisement for the brutish sensibilities and shallow brainpans of the people who now control the city.” “Why We Hate the Subways,” despite being timely, was written in 1977. (Alexander Cockburn for Village Voice)

Thank goodness for people like the non-profit Greenpoint Cats, who have been doing their best to look after bodega cats left behind or abandoned as bodegas close. (Aaron Simon for Greenpointers)

10 great sandwiches still available in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Police are investigating the death of a man who was found floating in the East River near Roosevelt Island. (Emily Davenpont for QNS)

New York remains on PAUSE until at least May 15. (Kathleen Culliton for PAtch)

Reports of domestic violence have dropped dramatically across the city, and that’s not a good thing. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

Watch New Yorkers sing “New York, New York” out their windows after Thursday’s 7 pm clap, a project of the Peace of Heart Choir. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

In what started as a cheap way to live, an $800-a-month illegal bedroom in Bushwick with no windows now sounds more like a cruel experiment. (Trey Taylor for Curbed)

Do you miss Shake Shack? Here’s the recipe for the ShackBurger and ShackSauce. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The best brunch options in NYC available for delivery. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The Briefly for August 12, 2019 – The “LaGuardia Airport: A Hellhole of Hellholes” Edition

Zombie homes, free subways and buses on holidays, the ultra-rich New Yorkers funding Trump’s campaign, the Islanders are leaving Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are extensive, double-check the trains before staying out late. (Subway Weekender)

The second phase of the Hudson Yards construction involves something pretty common to NYC: delays from the MTA. (6sqft)

A history, explanation, and timeline of the LaGuardia construction. (amNY)

Saying LaGuardia Airport sucks in 2019 is underselling the sheer nightmare that is trying to escape the city from an airport where 90% of people are using private transportation to get to. Thursday’s disaster scenario of people walking on the highways and ramps to catch their flights was blamed on it being of the 45 peak travel days for the summer. Between the MTA’s stellar track record for buses, the Port Authority’s control of the airport, the DOT’s control of the roads and individual airlines’ construction on terminals, this is a problem that will persist for years.

Where’s the governor on all of this? He’s called this whole mess “unavoidable,” while also taking no specific action to make traveling to the airport any less hellish. If you’re traveling on any of the 19 “peak” days in August, the Port Authority suggests leaving multiple hours earlier to account for the travel disaster waiting for you. (Gothamist)

The “zombie homes” in Sheepshead bay are becoming a real problem for the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York state has a case against ExxonMobil for misleading its shareholders by lying about knowledge of climate change as early as 1977, and now the state has caught ExxonMobil attempting to intimidate the witnesses. Opening statements are scheduled for October 23. (Inside Climate News)

If you’re the type of person who hates having money and loves martinis, maybe The Algonquin Hotel’s $10,000 martini is for you, which comes with a diamond ring. (Untapped Cities)

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade replaced animals from the Central Park Zoo with balloons in 1927. The company turned to Greenwich Villager Tony Sarg to create the first iconic balloons for the parade. (GVSHP)

Incomplete data and sporadic surveys make measuring storefront vacancies difficult, but a study from the Department of City Planning shows the problem doesn’t exist everywhere in the city. Jackson Heights has the lowest vacancy rate of the areas surveyed at 5.1% compared to Canal Street, which is at 25.9%. (Curbed)

The history of how a natural gas pipeline turned into a 30-mile offshore windfarm. (The Indypendent)

This week’s forced restaurant closures do not disappoint with two different places being closed by the Department of Health, both scoring over 100 violation points in the process. (Patch)

The worry over rentable Revel scooters in Brooklyn and Queens is just that, worry. The company’s mission enjoys rare support from both the Department of Transportation’s Polly Trottenberg and Transportation Alternatives, and if they proved to be dangerous, you’d be reading about the danger they pose to pedestrians in The Briefly on a regular basis. (NY Times)

These are the city’s top high schools. (Patch)

The city is transforming two East Harlem lots into all below-market-rate apartments with 30% set aside for the homeless as part of the East Harlem Housing Plan. (Curbed)

Does no one ride the subways on major holidays because the MTA cuts service or does the MTA cut service because no one rides the subways on holidays? City Councilmember Justin Brannan will propose a non-binding resolution to request the MTA offer free subway and bus service during New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day in a similar fashion to how parking meters are suspended on those days. The MTA is, of course, against anything that would promote more people to take the train or buses. (6sqft)

85% of people stopped for mass transit fare evasion are black or Latinx, which echoes the unmistakable racist enforcement of stop and frisk. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Islanders are getting a permanent home in Belmont Park with a 19,000 seat arena for the team is dead last when it comes to attendance figures for the last two seasons. (QNS)

A list of the 1% of the 1% of New York City that is fueling Trump’s reelection campaign. Of course, the city’s worst musician and Knicks owner James Dolan is on the list. (Gothamist)

The condo board of 25 Central Park West is asking neighbor buildings for money to continue to fight their lawsuit against a protected bike lane that could have saved the life of cyclist Madison Lyden. (Streetsblog)

Mike Chen is testing the six top burgers in the city, which will come out ahead? (Viewing NYC)

Already tired of the 2020 primary race among Democrats? Here is a list of possible 2021 hopefuls for NYC mayor. (amNY)

As Sunset Park becomes more popular thanks to a gentrifying neighborhood and Industry City, Third Avenue’s dangers become more pronounced. The death of Em Samolewicz is one of eight fatalities and 2,000 injuries on Third Ave since 2011. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A judge issued a stay and once again blocked the 14th St busway from becoming a reality. Every single headline about this story has used some variation of the phrase “slams brakes on” like it was legally mandated. (Downtown Express)

29% of the 15,500 structural components at subway stations were found to be worn or damaged, and that number is up since 2012. Comforting, right? (amNY)

Anti-ICE protestors shut down the West Side Highway at 26th St on Saturday for an hour. (Splinter)

Were you among the 10,253 people treated by the FDNY between 2011 and 2018 whose personal information, including social security number, was accidentally left on a hard drive and misplaced? (amNY)

The New York Philharmonic’s Free Fridays are returning, giving away tickets to people between 13 and 26 with an online reservation system. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jeffrey Epstein is dead of an apparent suicide, but the investigation into his crimes is not. The FBI and prosecutors will turn their attention to his accomplices. (NY Times)

The city’s 19th cyclist was killed by a teenage driver on Sunday in Midwood. (Brooklyn Paper)

City Hall Park is now adorned by “Estructuras Monumentales“, works by 104-year-old local artist Carmen Herrera and will be on display through November 8. (Downtown Express)

A deep look into Corey Johnson’s plans to kill the city’s car culture. (Gotham Gazette)

35 solid happy hours. (Eater)