The Briefly for November 8-9, 2020 – The “Pure Joy in One Specific Eviction” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Legal weed gets Cuomo’s support, date night delivery in Manhattan, Covid rates hit 2%, a new BLM mural, and more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 70˚
Clear throughout the day.

Governor Cuomo says the conditions are “ripe” for legalizing marijuana sales. The “ripe” conditions appear to be after years of promises and after New York’s third neighbor has legalized it. (Bronx Times)

Apartment Porn: A $1.7 Park Slope condo with some of the highest ceilings I’ve ever seen and two stunning outdoor spaces that are bigger than the apartment. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

It was hard to ignore the pure joy that swept most of the city on Saturday as the country decided to give Joe Biden a new job and evict Donald Trump from the White House. (Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

From November 15 through December 15, you can catch the 2020 Creative Climate Awards, hosted by the Human Impacts Institute, across four boroughs. 15 artists will each create window installations in previously empty storefronts that highlight the climate crisis. (Jessy Edwards for The Brooklyn Reader)

How “Defund the Police” became a flashpoint in competitive New York races. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

He’s called Black NYPD officers as “animals,” Public Advocate Jumaane Williams as a “twitching missing link” on a police message board, and according to a report from the City Council, he’s Deputy Inspector James Kobek, the commanding officer of the NYPD’s Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, whose duties include “promoting a fair and inclusive workplace that is free from discrimination and harassment.” He has been removed from his post as the investigation continues. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

“Black Lives Matter” is a political statement according to the NYPD officer that ejected a 23-year-old from wearing a BLM shirt at a polling site. The shirt wearer was threatened with arrest if he didn’t leave the polling site. The officer was, of course, white and the incident was caught on video. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

The NYPD seized a Brooklyn playground and is using it to park their personal vehicles. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

There is a new Black Lives Matter mural in midtown by artist Alexandre Keto. You can find it at 1100 Sixth Avenue at 43rd Street and it will be on display for at least four months and was commissioned by ArtBridge and done via the Department of Cultural Affairs’ City Canvas program, which turns construction fencing into art. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Five things to know if you’re going out to protest in New York City. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Steve Cohen is the new owner of the Mets and he’s starting by flushing the team’s front office from Citi Field in, ahem, Flushing. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewyork Metro)

Want to hike or bike from NYC to Canada? Weird idea, but the Empire State Trail will be finished this week and will, yes indeed, connect NYC to Canada. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

NYC filming locations for The Undoing on HBO Max. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Governor Cuomo gave the go-ahead for some restaurants inside the previous Brooklyn “red zones” to resume indoor dining. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The city’s average positivity rate continues to climb, hitting 2% for the first time since June. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Did you know that Thomas D. Rice, the creator of the “Jim Crow” song and dance, is buried in Green-Wood Cemetery? (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

If you want to gleefully count down the days left in the Trump presidency, head over to Long Island City to see the Trump countdown clock on 44th Dr. (Michael Dorgan for LIC Post)

The city will have a special election on February 2, 20201 to fill the City Council seat recently vacated by Rory Lancman in the 24th City Council District, which covers Kew Gardens Hills, Fresh Meadows, Hillcrest, Pomonok, Jamaica Estate, and Briarwood. Lancman was appointed by the governor as Special Counsel for Ratepayer Protection. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

QAnon supporter Mark Szuszkiewicz has been elected to the New York State Assembly, defeating Assemblymember Mathylde Frontus, to represent Coney Island, Bay Ridge, Brighton Beach, Sea Gate. He’s claimed that Tom Hanks is a pedophile, downplayed the severity of Covid-19, and claimed face masks spread Covid-19. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The NYC Sheriff’s Office broke up a hookah party inside a warehouse in Kingsbridge in the Bronx with over 125 attendees. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

There are signs of Christmas all over the city, but who would have expected an anarchist Christmas wreath to pop up on St Marks so early? It’s anarchy! (EV Grieve)

The Manhattan date night delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for June 8, 2020 – The “I Guess This Is Phase One?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Phase one kicks off today, the mayor is forced to lift the city’s curfew early, the MTA’s plans for phase one, a protest of the mayor, and more

Are you absentee voting this month? (You should be absentee voting this month.) Here’s how to make sure your absentee vote counts. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

The absentee ballot deadline was extended to June 23. Get your application in now. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Here we go, phase one. Here’s what it means. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The mayor announced he would end the city’s curfew one day early because, according to him, there had been a night without violent protests. In the reality that the rest of us live in, a lawsuit from the NYCLU, the Legal Aid Society, the Thurgood Marchall Civil Rights Center, and the Center for Constitutional Rights were about to force the mayor to lift the curfew and three different district attorneys in the city refused to charge most protestors that were arrested. (Ali Tufan Koc and Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

A protest of the mayor is expected on Monday morning (or was expected, depending on when you read this) to push de Blasio into actually enacting police reforms. The march, which includes members of the mayor’s administration, isn’t organized by the same people who wrote the open letter tot he mayor, but it shows how unified the city is in its disgust over the mayor’s ability to talk a lot and do very little. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

As Minneapolis already has, activists are calling on the NYC Department of Education to cut ties with the NYPD. Chancellor Richard Carranza, appointed by the mayor, does not favor a “counselors not cops” approach to school safety. Since 2014 the school safety budget has increased by 25% and while the school budget for next year is decreasing under the budget already revealed by the mayor, the budget for safety is increasing. (Alex Zimmerman for The City)

What can the city do with the NYPD’s $6 billion? Quite a bit. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Thursday night’s NYPD ambush of peaceful protesters was, according to Commissioner Dermont Shea, “executed flawlessly.” It included beating and arresting legal observers, medics, pepper-spraying a pregnant woman, and featured Terence Monahan kneeling with protesters one moment and directing officers to arrest the protest’s leaders the next. The NYPD claimed that “interlopers” were to blame for the police violence but a video of what happened shows otherwise and the NYPD has yet to show any evidence of this. (Jake Offenhartz and Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A look at the NYPD’s strategy of “kettling” protestors, which shows a shift in police tactics towards aggression. Of course, the mayor has defended this practice, saying it is sometimes necessary for public safety. I’m not sure which public he’s referring to. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Does the name Terence Monahan ring a bell? It should because he was the person in charge of the city’s response to protesters during the 2004 GOP convention. In 2004 the protesters had been told they could march and were then arrested en masse. Charges were dismissed against all 227 arrested. The city later settling a lawsuit with the protesters for $18 million. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Terence Monahan has a legacy of brutality. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

Governor Cuomo announced a “Say Their Name” package of bills which would criminalize making a false race-based 911 call, ban chokeholds, revise 50-1 (unknown what this means), and assign the Attorney General an independent prosecutor for matters related to the death of unarmed citizens caused by law enforcement. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The state’s Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus has their own package of 13 bills they’ve unveiled which also adds mandates for body cameras for state and MTA police, establishes strangulation as a crime mandates medical attention for people under arrest, and more. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

We’re committed to seeing a shift of funding to youth services, to social services, that will happen literally in the course of the next three weeks, but I’m not going to go into detail because it is subject to negotiation and we want to figure out what makes sense.” -Mayor de Blasio, talking big, one more time. He says “literally in the course of the next three weeks” because it literally has to get done because of the city’s budget, not because he wants to enact reforms quickly. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Two NYPD officers were suspended for violence against protesters. One is the officer who pushed a woman to the ground and the other the officer who pulled down a protester’s face mask and pepper-sprayed him. Just two. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Next, suspend every cop who covered their badge number during the protests with the bullshit excuse of the covers being “mourning bands.” (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Photos: East Village storefronts show their support for Black Lives Matter. (EV Grieve)

In comparison, the award for “the shittiest tribute to victims of racial violence” goes to the Museum of Ice Cream’s “I Scream For…” painted boards. (Elie Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Returning to the subways today? Here’s what you need to know. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The MTA clearly has a plan for people who will be riding the subway. It may not be a perfect plan, but it’s a plan. The mayor? Come on, you know he doesn’t have a plan based in reality. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

“This week and going forward, you might notice some other helpful additions to your local station — like new hand sanitizer dispensers and new signs reminding you how to keep yourself safe. You’ll also see floor markings, floor decals, and new directions aimed at communicating with you clearly about how to safely move around our system.
-Sarah Feinberg, acting President of MTA New York City Transit for amNewyork Metro, MTA is glad to have you back for the NYC reopening

With June 8’s phase one reopening of the city, you might be asking a few questions that are closer to home, like “will my building’s gym/pool be opening soon?” Get ready for a complicated road back. (Joanne Kaufman for NY Times)

The city will begin testing sewage for Covid-19, to get an idea of how the virus is spreading hundreds or thousands of people at a time. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Governor Cuomo signed a bill into a law that will grant death benefits to Covid-19 frontline workers’ families. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

A peek into what remains of Park, a Chelsea restaurant that abruptly closed last year and appears to be slowly taken over by trees. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

If you’re like me, at this point in the summer you’d have ridden the Coney Island Cyclone multiple times. If you’ve been missing the anticipation of the climb of the first hill and the exhilaration of the drop, these 360° videos of the Cyclone and Thunderbolt are gonna be as close as we can get for a while. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Last Wednesday night the city’s known Covid-19 death toll hit 0 for the first time since March 12. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

James Bennet, who oversaw the editorial pages of the NY Times, is out. The paper blames it on “a significant breakdown of our editorial process” because of the Senator Tom Cotton editorial which promoted violence against protesters. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

RIP Kanela, a red-headed Siberian husky and the unofficial mascot of Welcome2TheBronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

In 1982, the MTA thought they could paint their cars brilliant white to prevent them from being spray painted. “The Great White Fleet” idea was as stupid as it sounds. (Kevin Walsh for Forgotten New York)

A bit of news that passed by in the insanity that was Memorial Day weekend and every single day since then, the City Council banned the use of the terms “alien” and “illegal immigrant” on official city documents. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Central Park West’s mystery manhole cover. (Ephemeral New York)

Apartment Porn: A $3.5 million townhouse in Prospect Heights with outdoor space, amazing woodwork, and one of the most wildly-colored bathrooms I’ve ever seen. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A list of lists: A roundup of NYC’s Black-owned restaurant lists. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Thank you to reader Michael for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 17, 2020 – The “Every Hour is Happy Hour When Time is Meaningless” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city’s budget goes wartime, the best brunch options for delivery, high end stores are boarding up their windows, and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 51˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 41˚ High: 63˚

4K VIdeo: Walking through Times Square. (ActionKid)

In honor of his late grandmother, Michael Che will be paying May’s rent for the 160 apartments in the NYCHA building where she lived. (Ron Dicker for HuffPost)

Rent in the city dropped 6% since the start since March 22. (Localize.City)

Tenant groups are set for a rent strike on May 1. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Sick of sourdough? Here are seven bread options for you to try. (Sam O’Brien for Atlas Obscura)

The allure and anxiety of drinking along in quarantine. (Alice Feriring for Grub Street)

What time is it okay to start drinking alcohol? It’s hard to tell because time has no meaning anymore. (Shayla Love for VICE)

Slowly, the city’s government is finding a way to move forward. The City Council and the Landmarks Preservation Commission will start meeting digitally next week. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Taxi drivers were struggling before the pandemic. With COVID-19, they face even more difficulties. (Estefania Hernandez for NY1)

Are you willing to go to a live sport without a vaccine? 61% of sports fans and 71% of people overall are unwilling to go until there’s a vaccine. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Keith McNally’s Lucky Strike on Grand Street is closed for good. Is it the first domino to fall when it comes to independent restaurants? (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

From former Roberta’s and Speedy Romeo chef Robert Guimond comes Public Display of Affection, a wood-fired pizza spot in Park Slope on Union Street. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio released a revised “wartime” budget on Thursday, with a $6 billion reduction. “A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“A budget is a statement of values,” according to the mayor when speaking about his budget. Last year he said, “Placard abuse erodes faith in government and has no place in our city.” This year he’s eliminating the Placard Abuse Enforcement Team. Activist Charles Komanoff has a different idea: Disband the Collision Investigation Squad instead. (Charles Komanoff for Streetsblog)

Workers at two luxury Manhattan residential buildings, The Chamberlain and 432 West 52nd Street, walked out on the job, claiming poor work conditions and harassment. (Sylvia Varnham O’Regan for The Real Deal)

It’s easy to think that artists should use this time to create something new, but the reality of the moment can be much heavier than imaginable. This is Rori Nogee’s story of going from having six jobs and a show ready to open on Restaurant Row to a 100% loss of income and opportunities. (Rori Nogee for New York Cliche)

A look at what might be New York City’s last open bookstore. (Hoa P Nguyen for Bedford + Bowery)

I first saw it from a friend’s story on Instagram, the boarded-up stores in Manhattan. It’s a pandemic, not The Purge. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Pizza bagels? Pizza rolls? Please. Forget it, now pizza cupcakes are ready for delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Tired of the same old views? Check out the livestreams of the Bronx Zoo and the New York Aquarium. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

“It should be stated bluntly that traveling on the New York subway system is now one of the more frightful experiences Western civilization has to offer on a regular basis. The experience is not only intolerable. It is also a daily advertisement for the brutish sensibilities and shallow brainpans of the people who now control the city.” “Why We Hate the Subways,” despite being timely, was written in 1977. (Alexander Cockburn for Village Voice)

Thank goodness for people like the non-profit Greenpoint Cats, who have been doing their best to look after bodega cats left behind or abandoned as bodegas close. (Aaron Simon for Greenpointers)

10 great sandwiches still available in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Police are investigating the death of a man who was found floating in the East River near Roosevelt Island. (Emily Davenpont for QNS)

New York remains on PAUSE until at least May 15. (Kathleen Culliton for PAtch)

Reports of domestic violence have dropped dramatically across the city, and that’s not a good thing. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

Watch New Yorkers sing “New York, New York” out their windows after Thursday’s 7 pm clap, a project of the Peace of Heart Choir. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

In what started as a cheap way to live, an $800-a-month illegal bedroom in Bushwick with no windows now sounds more like a cruel experiment. (Trey Taylor for Curbed)

Do you miss Shake Shack? Here’s the recipe for the ShackBurger and ShackSauce. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The best brunch options in NYC available for delivery. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)