The Briefly for April 12, 2019 – The “Racist If You Do, Racist If You Don’t” Edition

A hall of fame bad statement about a hit and run, Wegmans is opening this year, a gold steak, the bookmobile returns, the future of street meat, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s something you didn’t want to hear: Getting around on the subways this weekend will be more challenging than usual. (Subway Changes)

Why are there religious exemptions for vaccines? (NY Times)

A dragonstone throne will be inside the West Village Shake Shack in anticipation of Sunday’s Game of Thrones premiere. So unless you’re looking to sit on the throne, you may want to avoid that spot today. (amNY)

The city’s use of SHSAT tests for entrance to elite schools was called racist. The city’s attempts to eliminate the SHSAT tests for entrance to elite schools is called racist. (Politico)

A 4/20 guide to Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The NYPL bookmobile is making a comeback this summer, with a first test in the Bronx, while the Grand Concourse Library undergoes a renovation. (amNY)

Every city borough (except Staten Island) has a higher audit rate than the rest of the state. What gives? (Patch)

17 of the 21 buildings the city is buying for $173 million are “immediately hazardous,” which includes mice and roach infestations, lead paint issues, water leaks, and broken locks. There are over 400 open violations in the buildings and the landlords are under federal investigation for tax fraud and the lawyer representing them in the sale is a de Blasio fundraiser. Weird. (The Real Deal)

Wegmans will open this fall in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. If you lived or went to college upstate, your palms are probably sweating right now. (Eater)

Ivan Nieves was found guilty of vandalizing the African Burial Ground National Monument, which happened on November 1. (NY Post)

Does the Playboy Club have a place in modern New York City? (NY Times)

The most affordable restaurants in New York, according to 14 chefs. (Grub Street)

There have been some phenomenal F-bombs on local TV over the years, from Sue Simmons’ random outburst to Ernie Asnastos’ chicken “loving” incident. Kudos to Chris Cimino, an NBC weatherman who dropped an F-bomb on live TV at 8:15am. (NY Post)

Broadway is getting a Tina Turner musical this fall. (Time Out)

The city will no longer buy single-use plastic cups, forks, knives, spoons or plates for its agencies and the mayor has indicated he supports a ban on single-use plastic in restaurants too (read: straws), with exemptions for people with disabilities. (amNY)

As New York heads towards decriminalizing marijuana use, how it’s treated by the Administration for Children’s Services needs to change. (Gothamist)

If you’re aware of the L Project, MTA Chairperson Pay Foye says that is proof enough of the MTA’s transparency about the project. Right. (Gothamist)

P.S. 9 Teunis G. Bergen will be renamed the Sarah Smith Garnet School to remove the history associated with the Bergen family as slave-holders. Garnet was the first African-American woman to become a principal in the city. (The Brooklyn Reader)

How did the city let the Y2K GPS crash happen? Don’t ask the mayor, because he already has his excuse. “I was not involved in the planning. It was not something that came up to my level.” (NY Post)

Meet the members of Community Board 6, who will decide the fate of the Gowanus neighborhood with a rezoning vote. (Pardon Me For Asking)

How to ID the fake monks that hang around tourist hot spots. (Viewing NYC)

A permit to sell street meat costs only $300 form the city but goes for $25,000 on the black market, which is why the Councilmember Margaret Chin wants to phase in an additional 4,000 permits over 10 years. Opponents are calling for more regulation before more permits are given out. (Patch)

A literal golden steak? Yup. It’s available on Staten Island. (SI Live)

“I left because, come on, I hit a little girl, I’m going to jail.“ Just when you think we’ve hit a hall of fame bad statement about someone’s alleged part in a hit and run, Julia Litmonovich also said: “What is the big deal, it was an accident.” (NY Post)

“Why can’t white people open Chinese food restaurants?” asks your uncle, who normally reserves this kind of stuff for his Facebook page. This is why. (NY Times)

Where to go when you’re not sure its a date. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for June 15, 2018 – Les Halles Preserves Notes, Toxic Algae in Back, No Bike Lanes, and More

Subway disruptions, the new owner of Les Halles is preserving the memorial notes left in Anthony Bourdain’s memory, toxic algae is found in Prospect Park after Central Park was hit earlier this week, Sunnyside doesn’t want bike lanes, and more

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Subway changes seem somewhat minimal this weekend. If you’re going to the Mermaid Parade, check to make sure your train is running.

Les Halles’ new owner is preserving memorial notes left in Anthony Bourdain’s memory.

Toxic algae was found in Prospect Park Lake in Prospect Park. This is an algae that is fatal to humans and dogs, so be careful. If you or your dog drink any lake water, head to a doctor immediately. The algae hasn’t been found at dog beach in Prospect Park, so you’re safe to bring your pup there. The city has been looking into a natural filtration system to prevent this in the future. Earlier this week toxic algae was found in Central Park.

Sunnyside’s community board voted against new protected bike lanes 27-8 because of a loss of parking spaces. The city is hoping to place bike lanes along Skillman Avenue and 43rd Avenue after a cyclist’s death in April.

Filming Around Town: Otherhood, starring Angela Bassett, is on Essex and Broome, The Break with Michelle Wolf is at 57th and 10th Ave, Ray Donovan is at Ditmars Blvd and Shore Blvd in Astoria, and The Deuce is at Bowery and Broome.

Eater has a list of 15 reliable vegan restaurants in the city.

Add doctors to the list of people who are calling on the state senate to review and expand the city’s speed camera program. The program would put speed cameras outside 290 public schools throughout the city. The doctors supporting the bill cited over 500 auto injuries this year, and the cameras already installed are credited with reducing speeding by 63% in locations they are installed. The bill is currently in a committee chaired by Simcha Felder, a member of the IDC held up the entire state budget earlier and told a group of democrats “I am not your guy” in the process.

City council member Margaret Chin proposed a new law banning vending around the World Trade Center in order to clear pedestrian traffic, but with 18 of the 22 current vendors being Muslim, it’s hard to not see this as Islamophobic. The new law would not apply to the WTC Greenmarket, which operates inside the no-vending zone and whose vendors are predominantly white.

The NYPD’s use of sound cannons against peaceful protestors was ruled to be an excessive use of force by a federal appeals panel this week. The ruling is, of course, being appealed. The case references use of the cannons during Eric Garner protests in 2014.