The Briefly for September 29 – October 1, 2020 – The “Atop A Burial Ground From The Revolutionary War” Tuesday Edition

The lastest NYC news digest: Indoor dining starts Wednesday, the scramble to open up schools, check your absentee ballots for errors, the best new restaurants, and more

Today – Low: 62˚ High: 73˚
Rain starting in the afternoon.

A followup to the video of mostly unmasked NYPD officers descending on a group of protesters and bystanders in the West Village over the weekend as the NYPD’s aggression refuses to cease. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Just in time for spooky season, historians are suggesting that bodies of Revolutionary War soldiers are buried under the site of a new pre-school in Gowanus. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Here’s what a K-8 student’s day might look like this year. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Inside the scramble to open up the city’s schools. (Eliza Shapiro and James Estrin for NY Times)

The number of students enrolled in remote classes is up to 48%, with many citing the city’s obvious bungling of school reopenings. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Sick of Mayor de Blasio’s shit the NYC principal’s union is calling for the city to cede control of our schools back to the state. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Photos: Kenny Altidor’s Chadwick Boseman/Black Panther mural in East Flatbush. (Todd Maisel, photos by Lloyd Mitchell)

The NYPD voided the bogus ticket that it gave to a crash victim over the weekend. Maybe next time they’ll understand the laws they are enforcing before writing tickets and also maybe they’ll wear masks while doing it. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The New York Road Runners are exploring how to bring organized running events back to the city including staggered times and mandatory masks. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Just because the Industry City rezoning is dead, it doesn’t mean the conversation surrounding rezoning the Sunset Park waterfront is over. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The history of the Evangeline Blashfield Fountain, a mosaic and ox-headed fountain sitting under the Queensboro Bridge. (Ephemeral New York)

Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a special exhibit, will be on view from October 1, 2021, to January 23, 2022 at the New-York Historical Society. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

NYPD traffic enforcement agent Produbh Deb was arrested on suspicion of strangulation and harassment of his wife. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Queens Congressperson Grace Meng passed a resolution in the House of Representatives to denounce anti-Asian sentiment that bubbled to the surface early during the Covid-19 pandemic. Naturally, the next thing to happen was Congressperson Meng receiving a series of anti-Asian voicemails. (Allie Griffin for Jackson Heights Post)

With unemployment twice as high as the rest of the nation, income tax revenue expected to drop two billion dollars, and zero tourism, New York’s financial future doesn’t exactly look like Scrooge McDuck’s vault/swimming pool. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Double-check your absentee ballots, because some New Yorkers are receiving the wrong ballots in the mail. The city’s Board of Elections is not taking responsibility for the error, passing it along to the printing company. (Dan Rivoli for NY1)

By way of a recent executive order, Gov. Andrew Cuomo is allowing unemployed New Yorkers to become poll workers without losing their unemployment benefits.  (Jackson Schroeder for Bushwick Daily)

If you’ve spent time on the subways or walking around the city, you’ve seen the ghost ads that are dotted all around, TV shows debuting in April, movies from March, and events that never happened. For seven months, a giant Dave Bautista looked over the East Village from the AMC Village 7, but now he’s gone. (EV Grieve)

If you don’t trust someone else to do it, do it yourself. Across the city, New Yorkers are volunteering to clean up their neighborhoods with Parks and Sanitation departments having their budgets cut. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

The city’s most exciting new restaurant openings. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

How to enjoy outdoor dining, now that it is a permanent fixture in New York. Did anyone say fleece-lined sweatpants? (Rob Patronite for Grub Street)

How twelve of the city’s food critics feel about the return of indoor dining on Wednesday. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Thanks to reader Sophia for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 8, 2020 – The “The Suburban Exodus That Never Was” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The Covid-19 school dashboard, how to track your absentee ballot, the best new pizza in Brooklyn, the BQX is dead, and more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 82˚
Clear throughout the day.

The Board of Elections in the city launched an Absentee Ballot Tracking system to confirm they received your request, mailed your ballot, accepted your ballot, and how to fix it if they didn’t accept it. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

How helpful is New York’s Covid-19 infection rate? It’s the metric we’re using for keeping public schools open and arguing that we’re ready for indoor restaurants to open. It’s a self-selecting number and experts are pointing out that it’s artificially low in New York. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

A Bay Ridge couple was escorted off an NYC Ferry in handcuffs and given a summons for their refusal to wear masks. They also claimed they were being targeted because they were white. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Normally getting hit with a “here come the stink bugs” headline is fine, but in 2020? Give me a break. (Adam Nichols, Reported by Beth Dalby for Patch)

The mass migration to the suburbs isn’t happening. (Jeff Andrews for Curbed)

A quiet Trump administration rule change that could pull FEMA Covid-19 disinfection funding for the city’s subways and schools. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer put forward a proposal to add 75 miles of bike lanes around 50 schools. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

The state is launching a dashboard to track Covid-19 cases in public schools. It’ll be available on September 9. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

21 schools in the city will not reopen due to problems with ventilation systems, switching to remote-only instruction. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

798 of the city’s 1,600 public schools have been approved for outdoor learning this fall. Schools can still apply, so expect that number to increase. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: Make your way downtown and Vanessa Carlton’s Soho loft can be yours for a cool $15,500 a month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Often you’ll see headlines about high-end restaurants or restaurants with chefs with a pedigree, but let’s celebrate the more normal. A 99 cent Pizza and hot dog joint opened up on Ave A. (EV Grieve)

Video: Héctor Zamora discusses “Lattice Detour,” his exhibition on the roof of The Met. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Where to eat and drink with your dog. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The city missed its own August 31 deadline for the final report in the investigation into the summer’s protests. The Civilian Complaint Review Board received 750 complaints from 250 incidents. What is the repercussion for missing the deadline? There are no repercussions. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

A look at the Black Surfing Association, who organized their fifth paddle out to protest police violence against Black people. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

J’Ouvert this year was marked with an eerily quiet Brooklyn with a heavy police presence with occasional small gatherings. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city’s recent uptick in shooting violence was felt at an unofficial J’Ouvert celebration, with five people being shot, including a six-year-old boy. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

Photos: It’s a tough bird to find, but a sora was spotted in Bryant Park over the weekend. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

How Astoria’s Niko’s Souvlaki persevered through the pandemic. (Loulou Chryssides for Give Me Astoria)

Buglisi Dance Theatre and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Table of Silence Project 9/11 performance ritual for peace will be streamed online. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

It looks like the Mets may have a new owner in Steve Cohen for about $2.35 billion. He’ll need to get 23 team owners to approve the purchase of 80% of the team. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The shooting death of Henryk Siwiak, killed on 9/11/2001, is the last unsolved murder of 9/11. (Ephemeral New York)

Governor Cuomo continues to fight against taxing the ultrarich. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Photos and Video: The NYC Deep Playa Night Ride, New York’s one-night answer to Burning Man, but on bikes and without the tech executives. (EV Grieve)

No, it’s not you, there are more mosquitoes this year than in years past. (Amy Pearl for Gothamist)

“Contingent and student workers have been disproportionately burdened by the NYU administration’s choices, and plans for Fall 2020 reproduce this inequity. High-level administrators and tenured faculty have been allowed to work remotely, while contingent faculty and workers must weigh health concerns against job security. This approach will compound existing inequalities, and will not keep us safe. We must make different choices.”
NYU: Keep Our Campus Safe petition

The Brooklyn Flea is bringing the open-air Chelsea Flea Market back on Saturdays and Sundays. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The mayor won’t make a decision about anything unless he’s forced to, including his own pet project, the BQX. Instead of just saying “this thing ain’t happening,” he’s punted the entire project to the next mayor. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

New York Attorney General Letitia James suspended the collection of medical and student debt that has been specifically referred to her office for collection for an additional 30 days. (Norwood News)

How to break a lease in NYC. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

The de Blasio administration withdrew its support for the YourLIC Coalition, the group of developers who were going to develop a 28-acre area on the Long Island City waterfront, the cursed spot o the Amazon HQ 2 development. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)

The story of Jess La Bombera, aka Jessica A. Krug, the white woman from Kansas City pretending to be Afro Latina and from the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The most beautiful post offices in NYC. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The best new pizza in Brooklyn. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 24, 2020 – The “One Thing the Pandemic Can’t Stop” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The eviction moratorium is extended, teachers fight back against starting school, the city sued over indoor dining, and more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 88˚
Clear throughout the day.

Do not wait. Click here to apply for your absentee ballot today. Everyone in the city can apply.

The Times lays out why an antibody test and its results are useless if you want to know if you’ve ever had Covid-19 or if you can’t get it again. (Donald G. McNeil Jr for NY Times)

Here comes the fall foliage, the greatest show in New York City this fall. Also, it’s the only show in New York City this fall. Here are some spots to check out the fall foliage. (Katrina Makayan for New York Family)

Of all the things that the Covid-19 pandemic has taken away from New York, but the $2 billion AirTrain to LGA isn’t one of those things, as the FAA’s draft Environmental Impact Study concludes it “best meets the stated Purpose and Need.” (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

Even Governor Cuomo wouldn’t give an answer when asked if he has school-age kids if he would send them back to NYC schools. Classes start on September 10. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Last week teachers rallied at Grand Army Plaza against reopening the city’s schools, citing unsafe conditions, a lack of a comprehensive testing program, and decades of neglect of the buildings themselves. (Emily Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

Can the city force teachers back into classrooms if teachers feel the classrooms are unsafe? The teacher’s union has begun gauging support for a strike over school reopening plans. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The subways will continue to stay shut down overnight, but the MTA is ending its program that gave free cab rides to stranded late-night essential workers. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Steiner Studios announced plans to build a 500,000-square-foot production facility on the waterfront in Sunset Park (less than a mile south of Industry City). This is a part of the city’s “Made in NY Campus,” which the mayor announced in his last “State of the City” speech, which is supposed to offer “more attractive rents than private property owners.” The city is contributing $15 million to construction costs. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

The ACLU has released data on complaints against over 81,000 current or former NYPD officers after the 2nd US Circuit Court of Appeals lifted the stay which blocked them from releasing the information. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

NYPD Misconduct Complaint Database. (New York Civil Liberties Union)

It’s been four months since Francisco Garcia, an officer with a history of misconduct complaints and lawsuits and was caught on video beating a bystander and kneeling on his head while “enforcing” social distancing on the Lower East Side. It was one of the early indications that the NYPD would treat social distance enforcement like Stop And Frisk. According to the NYPD, the disciplinary process is “ongoing.” (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A look at Crocheron Park in Bayside. At a time when the city’s parks have never been more valuable, Crocheron Park has never looked worse. (Queens Crap)

The Brooklyn Museum will reopen to the public on September 12 and the Brooklyn Aquarium will be reopening on August 27. Like everything else in life in 2020, there will be new restrictions. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

All New York evictions are suspended until October 1 thanks to a ruling from the Office of Court Administration. Advocates are calling for an indefinite moratorium and landlords’ attorneys want to start evicting people yesterday. (Isaac Scher for Bushwick Daily)

As more and more types of businesses reopen, Coney Island is left behind. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

It’s hard not to make the NYU-Fyre Fest comparison with students sharing what the “meals” the school has served them. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A lawsuit against New York’s statewide plastic bag ban was struck down by the state Supreme Court. The Bodega Association and plastic bag manufacturers brought the lawsuit. Nice to see this finally come to an end (for now). (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Following the city’s July 4th celebration, the de Blasio administration is working with Macy’s to ruin the Thanksgiving day Parade in similar fashion. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The city has no plans to reinstate indoor dining and 100 restauranteurs announced plans to sue the city to allow indoor dining in a reduced capacity. Outdoor dining is set to expire for the year on October 31. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Following Governor Cuomo’s “alcohol must be ordered with a substantial amount of food” is having an effect, causing the closure of the cocktail bar Mister Paradise in the East Village. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The State Liquor Authority has banned any advertised or ticketed music, karaoke, or other forms of live entertainment at bars and restaurants. This one is personal for me. I have been hosting socially distanced trivia since the start of July in an outdoor venue where every rule the state has implemented was strictly followed. It was free to attend, but we advertised it regularly. Is trivia entertainment? Depends on who you ask, but as of now, we have to stop. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Old Farmer’s Almanac has spoken about this coming winter. “Snowfall will be greater than normal in the Northeast.” Go to hell, Old Farmer’s Almanac. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The New York Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit challenging the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project, a multi-year effort to overhaul a stretch of the Lower East Side’s shore to protect the area from future flooding and storms. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

There will be a TONY award ceremony for the abbreviated 2019-2020 season. The show will take place this fall and it will be, of course, virtual. Broadway is currently closed through January 3, 2021, at the earliest. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Streetsblog asks a solid question: Why the hell are the double-decker tour buses still operating around the city? (Adam Light for Streetsblog)

11 inexpensive Times Square restaurants for takeout and outdoor dining. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)