The Briefly for March 24, 2020 – The “Quarantine Rainbow Scavenger Hunt” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The first day of remote learning for NYC, C trains temporarily shut down after an MTA worker tests positive for COVID-19, Economy Candy adapts, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 52˚
Clear throughout the day.

How to access unemployment and other government benefits right now. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

You won’t find a social media presence for Corona Courier, a community pairing bike couriers with people who need to self-quarantine. They deliver based on where their volunteers are located. If you’ve got some time on your hands and a desire to help, this is an opportunity for you. (Nicole Davis for Brooklyn Based)

The mayor is starting to talk about schools being closed for the rest of the year, despite being hopeful about letting students back in on April 20. (East New York News)

Here’s what NYC’s first day of remote learning looked like. (Alex Zimmerman, Christina Veiga, and Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The city’s playgrounds are open. Are they safe? “It would take a Herculean effort every five minutes, literally, that we simply can’t do.” -Mayor de Blasio. (Curtis Brodner for BKLYNER)

If you’ve been seeing rainbows in the windows of apartments around Brooklyn, welcome to the quarantine rainbow scavenger hunt. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Commuting in Corona Times” by Kera Hill is the new subway map that you have to see. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Three depressing charts that spell out the demise of the subways. (Streetsblog)

The work has begun to go through the articles that survived the fire at the MoCA archives on Mulberry St. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Brooklyn has the highest count of positive COVID-19, but so far it hasn’t been included in the state’s plans for a temporary hospital to deal with the sick and Borough President Eric Adams isn’t happy about that. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

How do you enjoy life?” was the note left behind by Robert Herman, photographer, and Tribeca resident, before jumping to his death from his 16th-floor window. (Jeremiah Moss for Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

Video: Drone footage of American cities, nearly deserted. (Matt Novak for Gizmodo)

The idea behind closing off some streets to automobile traffic is to alleviate the density in the city’s parks. Think about it like an ongoing block party where everyone has to remain six feet away from each other. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Here’s a list of the streets that TransAlt and Bike New York are calling for closure. The most surprising on the list is the Jackie Robinson Parkway, which also includes the NYC marathon route, NYC street fair routes, summer streets and car-free day streets, and more. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Turns out restaurants that were popular before coronavirus closed all the city’s restaurants are still popular now that we’re in “take-out only” mode. (Gary He for Eater)

Rao’s, NYC’s most exclusive restaurant, is offering take-out for the first time ever. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Does Scott Stringer realize he’s made a The Lox featuring Lil’ Kim and DMX reference when talking about why the census is important? (@NYCComptroller)

The city could be looking at a $6 billion hit during the projected six-month COVID-19 crisis according to City Comptroller Scott Stringer. As far as I can tell, that doesn’t include the $4 billion the MTA is asking for or the $1.9 billion the Port Authority is asking for. (Robert Pozarycki for QNS)

Photos: An empty NYC just before the PAUSE. (Jen Carlson with photos by Gretchen Robinette, Scott Lynch, and David “Dee” Delgado for Gothamist)

The MTA has announced that it has suspended fare collection on all of its local and select bus routes in order to keep its drivers safe from coronavirus. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

I used to work with someone whose weekly routine included taking a lunch break and going to Economy Candy to stock up for her desk and apartment. If you're someone for whom candy is a part of life, Economy Candy is now offering CandyCare Packs to keep you sugared up. (Holly Louise Perry for Bowery Boogie)

Now is the absolute worst time to open a restaurant, right? Say hello to the brand new Sofia’s Panificio e Vino in Little Italy. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Mike Bloomberg claimed that he’d be paying his campaign staff through November regardless if he dropped out of the race. He dropped out of the race and 2,000 of his former campaign staffers are suing him for fraud in a class-action lawsuit. (Christopher Cadelago for Politico)

Rough Trade NYC closed its online store without an explicitly stated reason. Relatedly, Amazon announced that it was pausing restocking vinyl and CDs, so this could be a supply chain issue. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

RIP Nashom Wooden, aka drag legend Mona Foot, a victim of COVID-19. (Mickey Boardman for Paper)

WABC 770 radio relaunched under a new owner. They had a party on March 16 for the relaunch on March 16, the same day the state limited gatherings to 50 and closed bars, restaurants, and gyms. Look at the photos of these idiots at a party in the radio studio. (amNewYork Metro, with no writer credited)

Community Gardens in the city are closed to the public “effective immediately” and “until further notice.” (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The EPA is evaluating if the Coney Island Creek is eligible to become a Superfund site. The waterway has been polluted for decades after the historical manufacturing of dye and gas in the area. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Gladson Ltd normally supplies Gucci, Paul Smith, Stella McCartney, and others with luxury fabrics, but they’ll be churning out a million facemasks for local hospitals. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A walk by the Long Island City Waterfront at Hunters Point South Park and Gantry Plaza State Park at night. (ActionKid)

City Harvest is looking for volunteers to pack food for fellow New Yorkers. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

On Monday morning the MTA stopped running C trains after an employee tested positive for COVID-19. 30 workers have tested positive for coronavirus. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The end of the month is coming. Are we going to see a rent freeze? (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The list of the best things the editors of Eater ate and drank this week looks vastly different while sheltering-in-place. (Eater)

“I always knew that when the end came, New Yorkers would watch it from a bar. But this was not the end any of us had imagined. Crowding together, not just a survival skill but an engine of the city in normal times, was the most dangerous thing of all.” -Pete Wells for NY Times

The Briefly for March 23, 2020 – The “NYC’s First COVID-19 Scumbag Politician Has Emerged” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: It is no longer showtime folks, COVID-19 updates, DMV closed, Amazon is possibly coming to Red Hook, Harvey Weinstein has coronavirus, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 45˚
Rain throughout the day.

New York is now considered a disaster area. Hooray? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Department of Environmental Conservation was planning to begin enforcement of the plastic bag ban on April 1, but it has been delayed until May 1. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

This is the moment when local politicians are starting to use the coronavirus outbreak for their own purposes. City Councilmember Chaim Deutsch, representing Brighton Beach, Midwood, and Sheepshead Bay, is using this moment to call for an end to the plastic bag ban. Deutsch was the lone vote on the City Council against the 5 cent paper bag fee and wrote an op-ed for The Yeshiva World titled “Are Plastic Bags The New Bail Reform?” arguing against the plastic bag ban. This is a disgusting use of a genuine crisis to push a personal agenda. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

Harvey Weinstein, an expert in non-consent, has something inside of him that he did not ask for: COVID-19. (Rebecca Fishbein for Jezebel)

An updated resource guide for artists and freelancers. (Savannah James for Bushwick Daily)

How to support the city’s venues during the outbreak. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Photos: One of the most devastating weeks for NYC restaurants. (Gary He for Eater)

A list of relief funds for the city’s restaurant workers. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

A tiny sliver of good news: You’ve got until July 15 to file your taxes. (Brian Faler for Politico)

Marine Park Hardware Corporation: a destination for tomato sauce? (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

Video: A bike ride through the neighborhoods surrounding Wall Street and City Hall. (ActionKid)

I was planning on growing out a “plague beard,” but it seems like we’re all headed in a shaggier direction, as salons and barbershops were ordered closed but the governor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Douglas Elliman executive chairman Howard Lorber warns that a tax on second homes for the rich could “be a disaster, not just for real estate, but for the economy in New York.” Buddy, maybe it’s time to rethink the use of the term disaster. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Love is dead. The city’s marriage bureau is closed until further notice. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The DMV is closed until further notice. The concern over traveling with a REAL ID come October isn’t nearly as pressing right now, but unless that deadline gets extended, New York is in for a real mess come October. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

Gem Spa is closed, temporarily. (EV Grieve)

Calls are getting louder to put a construction moratorium in place during the outbreak. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Thanks to Governor Cuomo, we’re all on PAUSE, which is absolutely not a shelter-in-place order, or else he’d be agreeing to something Mayor de Blasio proposed. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

In order to allow the real estate industry to continue moving forward, the governor is authorizing notaries to sign documents virtually. Wait, how does something get virtually notarized? (E.B.Solomont for The Real Deal)

Amazon is bidding on four former Fairway Market stores, including a Brooklyn location which I assume is the former Red Hook store. The other three are outside the city. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Revel is offering free memberships to healthcare workers and is expanding its service area to cover multiple additional medical centers. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The governor requested that FEMA erect four 250-bed Federal hospitals at the Javits Center. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The city’s hospitals are running dangerously low on personal protective gear. City health officials told hospitals to stop testing patients unless they needed hospitalization. Each test administered requires an entire set of gowns, gloves, and masks that can’t be reused. Without help, the city will run out of supplies in two weeks. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

How to donate supplies to hospitals. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

It’s the worst time to give birth in New York City. All visitors, including partners, are banned from maternity wards in NewYork-Presbyterian hospitals. (Rebecca Fishbein for Jezebel)

Andrew Yang announced his foundation Humanity Forward was partnering with One Fair Wage for a Universal Basic Income pilot program to give $1,000 to 1,000 families in the Bronx and more for families across the country hit with job losses during the COVID-19 outbreak. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

10 great outdoor sculptures in NYC you can visit without getting too close to other people. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Broadway producers reached an “emergency relief agreement” agreement to pay hundreds of actors, musicians, stagehands, and others for the first few weeks of the industry shut down, and to cover their health insurance for at least a month. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Bike shops are now considered essential businesses and will stay open across the city. (Gersh Kuntsman for Streetsblog)

The city will add emergency protected bike lanes on Second Ave in Manhattan and on Smith Street in Brooklyn by the end of next week in an effort to increase bike safety. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Saying that “a storm is coming” is an absolutely terrifying thing for the jail’s chief physician to say. (Jan Ransom and Alan Feuer for NY Times)

Here’s how students and teachers are prepping for their first day of remote learning. (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

For the first time in a long time, it’s no longer showtime. (Jake Bittle for Gothamist)

A look at the role of doormen during an epidemic. (Guy Trebay for NY Times)

RIP Eli Miller, one of the last seltzer men of NYC. (Daniel E. Slotnik for NY Times)

Go watch some birds. Not birdwatching, but just watch some birds. Without crowds of people to sit and watch, the Times makes the case to relax and imagine what all those geese are gossiping about. (James Gorman and Natalie Keyssar for NY Times)

Don’t flush disinfectant wipes or toilet paper down the toilet. DO NOT. (Michael Levenson for NY Times)

New York state passed a new sick-leave bill for employees who are subject to a mandatory quarantine or isolation due to COVID-19. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Headlines: Help, I Think I’m In Love With Andrew Cuomo??? and My Best Recollection of the Call I Just Had With Andrew Cuomo. (Rebecca Fishbein for Jezebel)

Thank you to reader Robert for today’s featured photo from the Imani Garden in Crown Heights!

The Briefly for March 18, 2020 – The “Mom and Dad Are Fighting Over Quarantine” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Uber Pools are banned, NY ramps up COVID-19 testing, the Night Mayor makes a request, price gouging becomes illegal, Whole Foods needs bikers, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 53˚
Rain overnight.

Today’s free stream from the Met Opera is Puccini’s La Bohème. Be patient, as their website is being inundated with people wanting to watch.

Ridgewood’s Nowawadays is streaming every night at 8pm.

Caveat’s free programming tonight is Nerd Nite.

Governor Cuomo is the guest on today’s edition of The Daily podcast from the Times. (Michael Barbaro, produced by Austin Mitchell, Adizah Eghan and Lynsea Garrison for NY Times)

The late-night shows are off TV, but they’re not off YouTube. Colbert gave a monologue from the bathtub while wearing a suit, of course. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

We all knew this would happen. The governor and mayor had been showing a unified front against the pandemic for almost a week, which is too long for their often strained relationship. Mayor de Blasio made waves by claiming that a shelter-in-place order might be coming in the next two days, but Governor Cuomo made certain to publicly state he’s the only person that can make that order and has no plans to quarantine any city. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

Mayor Bill de Blasio was so intent on keeping city libraries open during the coronavirus outbreak that he went as far as making veiled threats about cutting their funding if they closed. What a leader. (Sally Goldenberg and Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

“Our schools are important, he said. Here’s what we heard: Our lives are not.” -An editorial from Emily James, an NYC teacher looking at the last few weeks. (Emily James for HuffPost)

How to get around NYC safely during the coronavirus pandemic. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Uber, Via and Lyft pool rides in NYC are banned. The only people who should be getting into cars together are “real couples,” according to the mayor. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

What about Access-a-Ride? The MTA has made no such ruling, despite Access-a-Ride customers being among the city’s most vulnerable. The MTA is “working on it.” (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

Ridership is down 60% on the subways and 90% on commuter trains and the MTA is seeking a $4 billion federal bailout. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

This is how we know it’s a true problem: Alternate side of the street parking has been suspended. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Here’s how takeout alcohol sales work. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

$100 a tray for Japanese Hokkaido uni. Omakase boxes starting at $50. Can luxury restaurants go takeout? (Erika Adams for Eater)

What is a restaurant? Is the corner store that mostly serves pupusas a restaurant? A close-up with Mirna’s Pupuseria in Flatbush as they face their future in our new reality. (Ligaya Mishan for NY Times)

Is it possible to govern while socially distanced? We’re getting closer and closer to the due date for the state’s budget on April 1 and assemblymembers are being told to keep their distance. (Fred Mogul and Karen De Witt for Gothamist)

It’s like August in March. The 1% are heading to the Hamptons and spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to rent houses. (Kevin Sun for The Real Deal)

There have been a lot of comparisons to the 1918 Spanish Flu when talking about COVID-19, especially when saying that it became dormant in the summer and came back like the evil in the fall. How did NYC survive the 1918 Spanish Flu? (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The Brooklyn DA will not prosecute low-level offenders to reduce the number of people exposed to COVID-19. (Brooklyn Paper)

Video: A walk down a mostly empty Broadway in Astoria. (ActionKid)

It is illegal for any store to raise the price for any product or service that could limit the spread of coronavirus by 10% or more. We can thank the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection for the new rule to prevent price gouging. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

If you can ride a bike in the city, there may be a job for you. Whole Foods is looking for cyclists to deliver groceries. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

By Thursday, the city’s capacity for COVID-19 testing will be up to 5,000 tests a day. That doesn’t mean that anyone who wants a test will get one, but it means that people who should have been tested already will finally be tested and we can move forward from there. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re working from home and the apartment feels lonely, please remember that you can still foster a dog or cat. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

Four players for the Nets have tested positive for COVID-19, including Kevin Durant. (Joe Patorno for amNewYork Metro)

Bandcamp is waiving their cut of sales to show support for artists. If you’ve got a favorite band and want to show some support, go buy some mp3s. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Comic book readers: Call your local shop to see if they are accommodating curbside pickup for your new books this week. (George Gene Gustines for NY Times)

Photos: You know who doesn’t care about the coronavirus? Christo and Amelia, the Tompkins Square hawks. (Laura Goggin Photography)

Some people won’t ever listen, even if it means putting their entire community’s lives at risk. The FDNY broke up a Hasidic wedding in Williamsburg on Tuesday after more than 200 people were in attendance. In the same building, a school was in session. The Times goes out of its way to state that these kinds of events are influenced by the teaching of “extremist leaders” and do not represent the Hasidic community. (Liam Stack and Nate Schweber for NY Times)

Headline: “Brooklyn Ultra-Orthodox Community Faces Spike In Coronavirus Infections, Urgent Care Center Confirms” 🤔 (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Office of Nightlife is gathering information on the impacts for workers, performers, contractors, and businesses from COVID-19-related business closures and event cancellations. Please fill out the survey. (Nightlife Mayor Ariel Palitz)

The Bowery Ballroom and Mercury Lounge have put together a GoFundMe for their 100 staff members. (GoFundMe)

Philippe G. Massoud, chef-owner of ilili and ilili Box has a GoFundMe to provide dry and canned foods, diapers and other necessities to his 130 staff and families. I’m not sure how I’m going to keep covering these GoFundMe efforts. There are hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers who need help right now. (GoFundMe)

If you’re connected to a bartender or server or restaurant on social media, no doubt you’ve seen the requests for tips or support in whatever way is possible. The federal government has created out of thin air an additional $3 trillion-plus to flush into the economy. Where the hell is the help for the service industry? (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Friday’s looking to be a 70-degree day. Here are the 12 largest parks in the city so you can go outside but keep your distance. (Untapped New York)

Brief hits:
RIP Carolyn Egger, killed by a driver over the weekend in Jackson Heights. The driver was not charged. (Streetsblog) | A virtual tour of the Brooklyn Museum’s ‘Studio 54: Night Magic’. (Brooklyn Based) | The fight over the Atlantic Yards is not over. (The Real Deal) | A time-lapse video of the once-in-a-decade Agave titanota’s bloom, at the New York Botanical Garden. (Viewing NYC) | The gym ban applies to the gym in your residential building. (The Real Deal) | How to digitally borrow books from the NYPL. (Time Out) | Yes, my band does have a Bandcamp page, thanks for asking. (Bad Bloom)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!