The Briefly for September 8, 2020 – The “The Suburban Exodus That Never Was” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The Covid-19 school dashboard, how to track your absentee ballot, the best new pizza in Brooklyn, the BQX is dead, and more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 82˚
Clear throughout the day.

The Board of Elections in the city launched an Absentee Ballot Tracking system to confirm they received your request, mailed your ballot, accepted your ballot, and how to fix it if they didn’t accept it. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

How helpful is New York’s Covid-19 infection rate? It’s the metric we’re using for keeping public schools open and arguing that we’re ready for indoor restaurants to open. It’s a self-selecting number and experts are pointing out that it’s artificially low in New York. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

A Bay Ridge couple was escorted off an NYC Ferry in handcuffs and given a summons for their refusal to wear masks. They also claimed they were being targeted because they were white. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Normally getting hit with a “here come the stink bugs” headline is fine, but in 2020? Give me a break. (Adam Nichols, Reported by Beth Dalby for Patch)

The mass migration to the suburbs isn’t happening. (Jeff Andrews for Curbed)

A quiet Trump administration rule change that could pull FEMA Covid-19 disinfection funding for the city’s subways and schools. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer put forward a proposal to add 75 miles of bike lanes around 50 schools. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

The state is launching a dashboard to track Covid-19 cases in public schools. It’ll be available on September 9. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

21 schools in the city will not reopen due to problems with ventilation systems, switching to remote-only instruction. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

798 of the city’s 1,600 public schools have been approved for outdoor learning this fall. Schools can still apply, so expect that number to increase. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: Make your way downtown and Vanessa Carlton’s Soho loft can be yours for a cool $15,500 a month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Often you’ll see headlines about high-end restaurants or restaurants with chefs with a pedigree, but let’s celebrate the more normal. A 99 cent Pizza and hot dog joint opened up on Ave A. (EV Grieve)

Video: Héctor Zamora discusses “Lattice Detour,” his exhibition on the roof of The Met. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Where to eat and drink with your dog. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The city missed its own August 31 deadline for the final report in the investigation into the summer’s protests. The Civilian Complaint Review Board received 750 complaints from 250 incidents. What is the repercussion for missing the deadline? There are no repercussions. (Ethan Geringer-Sameth for Gotham Gazette)

A look at the Black Surfing Association, who organized their fifth paddle out to protest police violence against Black people. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

J’Ouvert this year was marked with an eerily quiet Brooklyn with a heavy police presence with occasional small gatherings. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city’s recent uptick in shooting violence was felt at an unofficial J’Ouvert celebration, with five people being shot, including a six-year-old boy. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

Photos: It’s a tough bird to find, but a sora was spotted in Bryant Park over the weekend. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

How Astoria’s Niko’s Souvlaki persevered through the pandemic. (Loulou Chryssides for Give Me Astoria)

Buglisi Dance Theatre and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ Table of Silence Project 9/11 performance ritual for peace will be streamed online. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

It looks like the Mets may have a new owner in Steve Cohen for about $2.35 billion. He’ll need to get 23 team owners to approve the purchase of 80% of the team. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The shooting death of Henryk Siwiak, killed on 9/11/2001, is the last unsolved murder of 9/11. (Ephemeral New York)

Governor Cuomo continues to fight against taxing the ultrarich. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Photos and Video: The NYC Deep Playa Night Ride, New York’s one-night answer to Burning Man, but on bikes and without the tech executives. (EV Grieve)

No, it’s not you, there are more mosquitoes this year than in years past. (Amy Pearl for Gothamist)

“Contingent and student workers have been disproportionately burdened by the NYU administration’s choices, and plans for Fall 2020 reproduce this inequity. High-level administrators and tenured faculty have been allowed to work remotely, while contingent faculty and workers must weigh health concerns against job security. This approach will compound existing inequalities, and will not keep us safe. We must make different choices.”
NYU: Keep Our Campus Safe petition

The Brooklyn Flea is bringing the open-air Chelsea Flea Market back on Saturdays and Sundays. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The mayor won’t make a decision about anything unless he’s forced to, including his own pet project, the BQX. Instead of just saying “this thing ain’t happening,” he’s punted the entire project to the next mayor. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

New York Attorney General Letitia James suspended the collection of medical and student debt that has been specifically referred to her office for collection for an additional 30 days. (Norwood News)

How to break a lease in NYC. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

The de Blasio administration withdrew its support for the YourLIC Coalition, the group of developers who were going to develop a 28-acre area on the Long Island City waterfront, the cursed spot o the Amazon HQ 2 development. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)

The story of Jess La Bombera, aka Jessica A. Krug, the white woman from Kansas City pretending to be Afro Latina and from the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The most beautiful post offices in NYC. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The best new pizza in Brooklyn. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 24, 2020 – The “One Thing the Pandemic Can’t Stop” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The eviction moratorium is extended, teachers fight back against starting school, the city sued over indoor dining, and more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 88˚
Clear throughout the day.

Do not wait. Click here to apply for your absentee ballot today. Everyone in the city can apply.

The Times lays out why an antibody test and its results are useless if you want to know if you’ve ever had Covid-19 or if you can’t get it again. (Donald G. McNeil Jr for NY Times)

Here comes the fall foliage, the greatest show in New York City this fall. Also, it’s the only show in New York City this fall. Here are some spots to check out the fall foliage. (Katrina Makayan for New York Family)

Of all the things that the Covid-19 pandemic has taken away from New York, but the $2 billion AirTrain to LGA isn’t one of those things, as the FAA’s draft Environmental Impact Study concludes it “best meets the stated Purpose and Need.” (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

Even Governor Cuomo wouldn’t give an answer when asked if he has school-age kids if he would send them back to NYC schools. Classes start on September 10. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Last week teachers rallied at Grand Army Plaza against reopening the city’s schools, citing unsafe conditions, a lack of a comprehensive testing program, and decades of neglect of the buildings themselves. (Emily Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

Can the city force teachers back into classrooms if teachers feel the classrooms are unsafe? The teacher’s union has begun gauging support for a strike over school reopening plans. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The subways will continue to stay shut down overnight, but the MTA is ending its program that gave free cab rides to stranded late-night essential workers. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Steiner Studios announced plans to build a 500,000-square-foot production facility on the waterfront in Sunset Park (less than a mile south of Industry City). This is a part of the city’s “Made in NY Campus,” which the mayor announced in his last “State of the City” speech, which is supposed to offer “more attractive rents than private property owners.” The city is contributing $15 million to construction costs. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

The ACLU has released data on complaints against over 81,000 current or former NYPD officers after the 2nd US Circuit Court of Appeals lifted the stay which blocked them from releasing the information. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

NYPD Misconduct Complaint Database. (New York Civil Liberties Union)

It’s been four months since Francisco Garcia, an officer with a history of misconduct complaints and lawsuits and was caught on video beating a bystander and kneeling on his head while “enforcing” social distancing on the Lower East Side. It was one of the early indications that the NYPD would treat social distance enforcement like Stop And Frisk. According to the NYPD, the disciplinary process is “ongoing.” (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A look at Crocheron Park in Bayside. At a time when the city’s parks have never been more valuable, Crocheron Park has never looked worse. (Queens Crap)

The Brooklyn Museum will reopen to the public on September 12 and the Brooklyn Aquarium will be reopening on August 27. Like everything else in life in 2020, there will be new restrictions. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

All New York evictions are suspended until October 1 thanks to a ruling from the Office of Court Administration. Advocates are calling for an indefinite moratorium and landlords’ attorneys want to start evicting people yesterday. (Isaac Scher for Bushwick Daily)

As more and more types of businesses reopen, Coney Island is left behind. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

It’s hard not to make the NYU-Fyre Fest comparison with students sharing what the “meals” the school has served them. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A lawsuit against New York’s statewide plastic bag ban was struck down by the state Supreme Court. The Bodega Association and plastic bag manufacturers brought the lawsuit. Nice to see this finally come to an end (for now). (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Following the city’s July 4th celebration, the de Blasio administration is working with Macy’s to ruin the Thanksgiving day Parade in similar fashion. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The city has no plans to reinstate indoor dining and 100 restauranteurs announced plans to sue the city to allow indoor dining in a reduced capacity. Outdoor dining is set to expire for the year on October 31. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Following Governor Cuomo’s “alcohol must be ordered with a substantial amount of food” is having an effect, causing the closure of the cocktail bar Mister Paradise in the East Village. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The State Liquor Authority has banned any advertised or ticketed music, karaoke, or other forms of live entertainment at bars and restaurants. This one is personal for me. I have been hosting socially distanced trivia since the start of July in an outdoor venue where every rule the state has implemented was strictly followed. It was free to attend, but we advertised it regularly. Is trivia entertainment? Depends on who you ask, but as of now, we have to stop. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Old Farmer’s Almanac has spoken about this coming winter. “Snowfall will be greater than normal in the Northeast.” Go to hell, Old Farmer’s Almanac. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The New York Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit challenging the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project, a multi-year effort to overhaul a stretch of the Lower East Side’s shore to protect the area from future flooding and storms. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

There will be a TONY award ceremony for the abbreviated 2019-2020 season. The show will take place this fall and it will be, of course, virtual. Broadway is currently closed through January 3, 2021, at the earliest. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Streetsblog asks a solid question: Why the hell are the double-decker tour buses still operating around the city? (Adam Light for Streetsblog)

11 inexpensive Times Square restaurants for takeout and outdoor dining. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The Briefly for July 24, 2020 – The “Fight For Your Right To Party Or Not?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: New York’s rent relief program, the 2020 blue wave headed for Albany, the NYPD fight against disclosure, where to eat in LIC, and more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 81˚
Rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 76˚ High: 90˚

Here’s a combination of words you wouldn’t expect to describe New York City: “humid subtropical climate zone.” Welcome to the era of the sultry night in New York City. (Lisa M Collins for NY Times)

The details about applying for Covid-19 rent relief. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

With the program being called “an endless pit of despair,” the rollout of the program has been anything but smooth, with technical problems plaguing literally every step of the way. The deadline closes for applications on July 30. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Videos: Watch purple lightning hit NYC, including the Statue of Liberty. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Because life isn’t hard enough for the owners of bars right now, the State Liquor Authority is demanding that bars must provide a “sit-down experience” with enough food to be shared by a small group and food must be ordered with the first round. Listen, let me drink my beer and leave me alone with this. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Ellen’s Stardust Diner on W 51st may be shutting down due to $618,459.22 in unpaid rent. In a confusing move, the landlords have put up a notice that they will assume possession of the property by August 7, despite the eviction moratorium in place through August 20. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A federal judge temporarily blocked the de Blasio administration’s plan to disclose tens of thousands of newly available police disciplinary records. Police unions argued that the public should not see “unsubstantiated” claims, while the rest of us argue that being able to see how many claims are listed as unsubstantiated is a part of seeing how the NYPD holds itself accountable. The NYCLU has some of the records, which they obtained with a FOIL request, but have been ordered not to release them. (Christopher Robbins and George Joseph for Gothamist)

The City, Gothamist/WNYC, ProPublica, and The Marshall Project want to hear about your experiences with the NYPD to help hold the NYPD accountable. (Terry Parris Jr for The City)

20 restaurants with takeout windows and seat-yourself tables. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The story of U Thant Island, the city’s smallest island. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Councilman Ritchie Torres declared himself the winner in the NY-15 Democratic Congressional primary. The results aren’t official, but it doesn’t look likely he’ll lose. If elected, he’ll be one of the first two Black openly LGBTQ members of Congress, along with Mondaire Jones from NY-17. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Jabari Brisport declared victory in Brooklyn’s 25th Senate District Democratic primary over Assemblywoman Tremaine Wright. If elected (and there’s a pretty darn good chance of that in the general election), Brisport will become the first openly gay person of color in the State Senate. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

How Brooklyn Assembly insurgents rode absentee ballots to upset incumbents in this year’s even more blue wave. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

Results for Covid-19 test conducted by the city have been dramatically cut down to two days and the city’s “Test + Trace” program found and isolated 2,000 people with coronavirus symptoms. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The driver of a pickup truck drove into an outdoor dining area in Sunset Park, sending three people to the hospital with minor injuries. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Robert Sietsema’s 10 favorite pandemic takeout dishes. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

In a message to the youths, Governor Cuomo said that while he respects your right to party, “ThIs Is NoT tHe TiMe To FiGhT FoR YoUr RiGhT tO pArTy” (Matt Troutman for Patch)

“The severe hailstorm was well-forecasted. Policing systems have forever been weaponized against minority groups to galvanize white supremacist agendas. To attack systemic racism is to acknowledge history and our own ignorance of it: Black lives have suffered injustice since the inception of our country. The change we bled for yesterday is the change we die for today.”
-Michela Wang, a student at Newark Academy, “This Is Not New”: Thoughts On Protests From NYC Teens for Gothamist

If you’ve got $88 million to spare, you can buy Jeffrey Epstein’s Upper East Side mansion. If you’ve got an additional $2 million, you should invest in enough bleach to clean the house. (6sqft)

What’s a carriage house? An explanation on the short, but wide homes with large interior spaces you may see dotted around the city. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

Attention America: Costco still does not trust you with sheet cakes. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

Congrats to Brett Gardener for becoming the 18th player in history to appear in 1,500 career games with the Yankees. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

“The gathering there got smaller and smaller, was less and less about protests. More and more, it became an area where homeless folks are gathering,” said the mayor, defending the dismantling of Abolition Park while simultaneously erasing the city’s homeless population’s participation in protests. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Citing an “alarming lack of direction” in the city’s plans for reopening school buildings, a Sept. 10 start date seems increasingly difficult to achieve, according to a letter sent by the head of the union that represents school administrators this week. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The State Senate passed a bill that would mandate the 24/7 operation of the city’s subways unless a state of emergency is in effect, finally giving us an answer if 24/7 would ever come back. Next stop: The Assembly. (Devin Gannon for 6qft)

The pandemic has hit the city’s arts organizations to the tune of $550 million, according to NYC’s Department of Cultural Affairs, SMU DataArts, and Americans for Arts. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

More than a dozen New York City Councilmembers are already asking for Albany’s support in canceling state math and reading tests for third-to-eighth graders this upcoming school year. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The federal government will allow New Yorkers back into trusted traveler programs after federal lawyers admitted that Homeland Security officials made false statements in a bid to justify expelling New York residents from programs that let United States travelers speed through borders and airport lines. Another lie from the Trump administration. (Ed Shanahan with Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

MLB is expanding its postseason to 16 teams, giving four third-place teams a spot in the playoffs. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The Tenement Museum laid off 76 part-time workers. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

A look at the Billion Oyster Project’s latest effort, shipping containers turned oyster farms using discarded shells from restaurants, to restore 100 million oysters into the New York Harbor a year. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

How will baseball games deal with rain delays in a shortened season? If it starts raining, the game’s over. The Yankees won a five-inning game last night to kick off their 2020 season. (NY1)

City Council Member Brad Lander is calling on the city to close streets to use them for outdoor instruction for the city’s schools. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

The Times used the right word when describing the exodus of tourists from the city: “flushed.” Will they come back? (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

Where to eat outside in Long Island City. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Stacy for today’s featured photo from the Elizabeth Street Garden.