The Briefly for June 13, 2019 – The “A New Subway Villain Has Emerged” Edition

The governor will sign the rent reform laws, the mayor looks to further restrict Uber and Lyft’s operations, the best veggie burger in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are the city’s top ten public high schools. (Patch)

The city’s new mansion tax is hitting on July 1, and sellers are already trying to price their way out of it. (StreetEasy)

New York City has a new subway villain. On different incidents, a man threw a bag of concrete, a fire extinguisher, Christmas lights, and a shovel. (Gothamist)

10 buildings connected to NYC’s maritime past. (Untapped Cities)

The best restaurants of 2019, according to Eater’s Ryan Sutton. (Eater)

“There’s a daunting task ahead of us on this,” is an understatement by the chair of the committee overseeing the $4 billion reconstruction of the BQE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Have you noticed the mannequin children strewn across the city in small cages? No Kids in Cages is responsible for the 25 protest installations across Manhattan, Queens, and Brooklyn. (Gothamist)

Outside of San Francisco, Brooklyn has the country’s most booming tech sector, growing 356% in the last ten years. (amNY)

Where to eat near the Boardwalk in Rockaway Beach. (Eater)

While the Governors Island “urban camping experience” isn’t exactly camping by most stretches of the imagination with miniature cabins, 1500 thread count sheets, wifi, electricity, a spa, and room service, but it does look nice (6sqft)

In the last year, the city ensured a minimum wage for Uber and Lyft drivers and prevented any new drivers from being added to the pool of e-hail vehicles which already makes up 29% of all cars below 60th in Manhattan. The mayor’s next restriction will be limiting the amount of time e-hail vehicles can cruise below 96th in Manhattan without a passenger. Currently, e-hail vehicles spend 41% of their time without passengers. That rate would have to drop to 31% under the coming rule, or companies would face fines or potentially have their licenses to operate revoked. (amNY)

Here is the horseshoe route for the World Pride Parade on June 30, which is expected to be the largest Pride Parade in history. (6sqft)

The DOT unveiled plans for a protected bike lane on Central Park West. The Community Board and City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal had called for a two-way bike lane, similar to Prospect Park West, but the DOT called that idea “psychologically unrealistic.” (Gothamist)

A guide to (responsibly) day drink. (The Infatuation)

I’m bullish on anything that brings more joy and delight to the city in a near-invisible fashion. See Me Tell Me is playing hide-and-seek with her art on Instagram. Right now the has under a thousand followers, but let’s see if we can’t change that. (Bedford + Bowery)

“Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds” may be the creed of the postal service, but in the city, it’s the food delivery person that follows that creed to the letter and City Comptroller Scott Stringer is adding his voice to those calling for the legalization of electric bikes with an op-ed for Streetsblog. (Streetsblog)

Take a ride on the 3rd Ave El in a film from 1955, documenting Manhattan’s last elevated subway line. (Viewing NYC)

The governor supports the rent reform bills that are working their way through the legislature and has voiced that once they’re on his desk he will sign them into law, which hasn’t always been a guarantee. (amNY)

When the rent reform bills become law, it will be the signal that the influence that New York’s real estate industry holds over the state’s politics is not untouchable. (NY Times)

Yoko Ono’s ‘The Reflection Project’ is moving into unconventional spaces in lower Manhattan, encouraging you to “rally the collective consciousness towards heightened awareness, hope and action.” Just don’t do it in someone else’s way. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Gem Spa on St Mark’s and Second Ave is in danger of closing. A combination of rising rents and a former employee selling cigarettes to a minor have threatened the iconic store’s 80-year existence. It’s likely the best place you can buy egg creams and fedoras and coffee and candy in the city. (Vanishing New York)

Another detainee died in the custody of the Department of Corrections two days after the death of Layleen Polanco on Rikers Island. The cause of death and name haven’t been released. (Patch)

This new IKEA robotic furniture looks right out of The Fifth Element. (6sqft)

The governor is pushing for the state to extend the statute of limitations for rape victims and change the legal definition of harassment. (Politico)

The new status symbol for performers is a Broadway residency and the latest name to make their way is Dave Chappelle. Dave Chappelle Live on Broadway will happen from July 9-13 with tickets going on same June 18th. (Gothamist)

A guide to Pride in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The House Judiciary Committee passed the bill to reauthorize and fund the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund for about seven more decades after being publicly shamed by Jon Stewart. (Patch)

How did Jon Stewart become the voice of the ongoing victims of 9/11? (NY Times)

“It’s another entertainment show beginning with an overwrought speech of a shaken host.” The first Daily Show with Jon Stewart after the 9/11 attacks is still worth watching. (Comedy Central)

A first look at the new DUMBO library. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Drone photos and videos from high above Green-Wood Cemetery. (Gothamist)

The city’s best veggie burgers. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for June 10, 2019 – The “Bill Becomes A Law Without Mayor de Blasio’s Signature” Edition

The OMNY finds success, a plan for Rikers that isn’t luxury apartments, even Sesame Street knows how rough the subways are, the MoMA’s closing and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late nights this week the Brooklyn-count N train takes up R duties after Whitehall, the F is local in Queens, and more reasons you should double check before going anywhere after 11pm. (Subway Weekender)

The full list of winners from last night’s Tony Awards. Hadestown was this year’s big winner with eight awards. (Variety)

Ride shotgun with Cynthia Erivo, while she gets ready for the awards. (NY Times)

A 22-year-old man was arrested on Thursday and arraigned on Friday for buying weapons for an alleged terrorist attack in Times Square. Turns out when he went to purchase weapons, it was from undercover agents. (amNY)

The city’s new Vision-Zero bill will turn into law, no thanks to the mayor. Instead of taking a moment during the brief times when he’s actually in the city where he’s the top official, Mayor de Blasio is allowing the bill to lapse into law. After 30 days, any unsigned bills in the city don’t need the mayor’s signature. (Streetsblog)

Of course, the former East Village home of the Hell’s Angels is becoming a 22-story residential tower with retail on the first floor. (EV Grieve)

Inside the new Pastis, and inside the celebrity-heavy family and friends (and press) preview dinner. (Eater)

Less than a year after opening in a new location, Barbara is playing MSG in August. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A restaurant group is fighting a city bill that would give all New Yorkers who work for a business with five or more employees two weeks of annual paid vacation. The argument from the state’s restaurant association is that it will kill the city’s restaurants. The argument from people who don’t own restaurants is that if you can’t afford to treat your employees fairly and with decency, maybe you shouldn’t run a business. (Eater)

There’s a new installation at the Oculus, a live rice paddy. (Untapped Cities)

The city celebrated Puerto Rico on Sunday with a parade down Fifth Avenue without one notable participant. Everyone except the mayor wasn’t there, choosing to campaign in Iowa instead. (amNY and Patch)

Maybe he should have stayed home. A recent poll had literally no one from Iowa choosing the mayor as their top pick, a feat he shares with Wayne Messam. Who? Exactly. (amNY)

Down below the street can you gid a steady beat, it’s the subway.” Even a Sesame Street song about the subway from 1975 bemoans random express trains, overcrowding, a lack of air conditioning and general rudeness. Plus, it’s a catchy song. (Sesame Street)

There’s a reason Coney Island is known as the “Sodom by the Sea,” and it ain’t crooked games of chance. The epicenter was “The Gut,” where Trump VIllage is today. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“We looked at it under the surgical microscope, and the best way I can describe it to you is that it was this very small, encapsulated lesion that basically looked like a quail egg.” If you’re squeamish, don’t read this story about how a tapeworm baby ended up inside this woman’s brain. (Gothamist)

You have until Saturday to see the MoMA before it closes for four months for expansion. (Curbed)

How did the boroughs get their names? (amNY)

Brauley De La Rosa, the guy who rammed a cyclist with his car during an argument is an FDNY officer and he says both the eye-witness reports and the video was “blown out of proportion.” Who among us hasn’t attempted to run someone over with our cars during an argument? (Gothamist)

A new bill will re-classify car wash workers as employees who should be receiving the minimum wage instead of treating them as tipped workers. Even with tips, workers usually make less than the soon-$15 minimum. The bill only requires the governor’s signature. (Jackson Heights Post)

“Why don’t you learn English?” Four families are suing the city for failing to provide with translation services for their disabled children. (Gothamist)

A roundup of the city’s newest beers and beer related happenings for the summer. (amNY)

Meet Saadiq Newton-Boyd, the New York City king of Pokemon GO. (Bedford + Bowery)

An illustrated guide to helping the city’s cats. (Gothamist)

Cases of measles have risen to 566 in the city, but as expected, the number of cases in Sunset Park outside of the Orthodox Jewish communities has mostly been contained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Never under-estimate a New Yorker’s desire to not take out their wallet. This is why the OMNY system will work. Usage is currently 3x the projections. (Gothamist)

If you’re into the idea of a 130-mile bike race, yes a race and not a ride, then The Brooklyn Red Caps are probably for you. A group with a history that dates back to the 70s, the Red Caps’ grueling journeys take them to Pennsylvania, upstate, Montauk and New Jersey. (NY Times)

RIP Nicky Barnes, the ‘Mr. Untouchable’ of Heroin Dealers. (NY Times)

7 takeaways from the disciplinary case or Daniel Pantaleo, the man whose actions may have lead to the death of Eric Garner. (NY Times)

Don’t put anything past real-estate developers, which is why the city council is readying bills to repurpose Rikers Island when it closes with a solar farm and wastewater treatment facility. (HuffPost)

It’s appalling to have to fight for full funding of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund, but here we are in 2019. (amNY)

Inside the stealth campaign for “responsible” rent reform, the efforts lead by landlords to attempt to stop the state’s attempts to totally rewrite the city’s rent laws. (NY Times)

Real food made by real people served to the city’s children. The point of view from the NYC Healthy School Food Alliance is not hard to understand. (amNY)

The American Museum of Natural History breaks ground on the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation this week. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo is calling the MTA’s management a “failure” after that new timeclock meant to prevent overtime fraud was installed in Queens. It should be noted that the governor technically oversees the MTA. (amNY)

The top restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

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The Briefly for June 7, 2019 – The “It’s Better to Work at the MTA Than to Ride It” Edition

The weekend’s subway disruptions, a Burger King sells fake vegan Whoppers, the world’s largest hot dog, the youths organized, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway work is relatively light thanks to the Puerto Rican Parade, but that doesn’t mean the city is without disruption. (Subway Weekender)

Simply put, this weekend’s weather looks great. (amNY)

This weekend’s forecast might give you a chance to see Jupiter in the sky. It’s close enough to earth to see it with a pair of binoculars, or at one of the multiple events put on by the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York. (amNY)

The MTA installed a new time clock at an LIRR station in Queens in order to cut down on the excessive overtime which caused recent controversy, and surprise surprise, it’s already been broken. (Gothamist)

Somehow the MTA made the list of the state’s best employers. (Patch)

Drag Queen Story Hour has remained 100% awesome, but every now and then some jackass comes along trying to put a stop to it. Why should this month be any different just because it’s Pride? (Gothamist)

Does the mayor understand the story of ‘Jekyll & Hyde?’ If the mayor spent any time in the city, he might want to go to the NYPL and read a book or two. (Patch)

A community board district manager in Brooklyn secretly gave himself a raise for the three years in a row by digitally forging the signatures of the board’s chairperson. Between this and the community board district manager who bought himself an SUV, what the hell is going on with Brooklyn’s community boards? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Brazilian street artist Kobra has 18 murals across the city as part of their “Colors for Freedom” series. Here’s where you can find them all, or just look at photos of them if you’re not feeling adventurous. (Untapped Cities)

With the city on the edge of banning fur, seems like a good time to look back at the history of New York’s fur trade. (6sqft)

A Burger King in Williamsburg has been selling the Impossible Whopper on Seamless, the all-plant Whopper, with one problem. They’re selling normal beef Whoppers. (Eater)

It looks like the mayor and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand are qualifying for the Democratic Presidential Debate later this month. (Politico)

Governor Cuomo supports the giving drivers’ licenses to undocumented New Yorkers, but his longtime ally Jay Jacobs (from Long Island, of course) is calling Democrats trying to kill support for the bill. (Gothamist)

Forget all other sports New York is a Musical Chairs city now. (Deadspin)

50 years after the fact, NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill has apologized for the NYPD’s role in the Stonewall Riots. (NY Times)

Turns out trying to actually spending time with an art masterpiece is harder than you’d think. (NY Times)

This weekend’s the Bus Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park, so grab the transit nerd in your life. It’s like Comic-Con for buses! (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’re trolling for the world’s largest weiner, it’ll be at Ulysses Restaurant on the 26th as Feltman’s (the original Coney Island hot dog) is bringing a 120 pound of frank and a five foot two inch bun in support of the Headstrong Project. (Coney Island Blog)

An analysis from the Independent Commission on New York City Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform shows that neighborhood jails don’t hurt crime rates or property values. (Patch)

The body of Joseph Calabrese, an NYPD detective, was found by Plumb Beach, just off the Belt Parkway. This was the second apparent NYPD suicide this week. (NY Times)

Tom Brady can go to hell for multiple reasons, but this time it’s because he is attempting to trademark “Tom Terrific,” which is, of course, the nickname of New York Met Tom Seaver. (Patch)

“Why are people on bikes in the city so angry?” Maybe because of psychopaths like this who regularly attempt to run them over. (Gothamist)

Youth, who normally spend their time terrifying adult subway goers with their fun-having, organized in City Hall Park to protest the city’s slow approach to integrating public high schools. (amNY)

With a city as old as New York, you’re bound to find a few surprises when you start to dig. For a parking lot near the South Street Seaport, surprise turned to concern when discovering a thermometer factory from the nineteenth century, which contains elemental mercury, the type that becomes airborne and can cause brain damage upon inhalation. (NY Times)

The best first date spots in the city. (The Infatuation)

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