The Briefly for September 5, 2018 – Is The World Ready for Aaron Sorkin’s Lee Harper’s ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ on Broadway?

To Kill a Mockingbird and King Kong are two new shows coming to Broadway this year, half the G train will shut down on weekends this month, paying tribute to Kenny Shopsin, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Half the G train is shutting down this weekend, and every weekend until Columbus Day. Buses will replace the G train between Bedford-Nostrand Ave and Court Square.

Brooklyn’s Windsor Terrace tops New York City’s affordable neighborhoods, as weighed by Localize.city. Second place on the list is Roosevelt Island.

Aaron Sorkin’s “To Kill A Mockingbird,” “King Kong,” and “The Cher Show” are three of the new shows coming to Broadway this year.

The best art exhibits to see at New York City museums this fall, according to amNY.

A woman on probation for animal cruelty pushed a probation officer down the stairs of her Jackson Heights home last week. Elizabeth Grant was convicted of 108 counts of animal cruelty for failing to take care of her 54 cats and dogs.

An ambulette collided with an electric scooter in the Bronx early Tuesday and killed the 25-year-old driver of the scooter and hurt a 42-year-old passenger.

Eater pays tribute to Kenny Shopsin of Shopsin’s General Store.

The Church of God of East Flatbush is getting into the real estate business. The church purchased two blocks on land for $8 million seven years ago and will build a new church and 531 units of affordable housing.

With the new school year restarts the debate about the SHSAT. The New York Times solicited stories from its readers about the admissions test.

Two years after Governor Cuomo ordered an investigation of racial bias in prisons, no findings or recommendations have been made.

Manhattanites are raising funds for laundry gift certificates to help homeless students this school year.

Executive Producer Dick Wolf is at it again.

Will he or won’t he? Mayor de Blasio hasn’t endorsed a candidate for Governor.

At least 15 men who were near Ground Zero on 9/11 have been stricken with breast cancer, defying astronomical odds. Nearly 10,000 people have suffered cancers linked to the toxic dust and smoke form the attack.

George C. Parker is one of many men who “sold” the Brooklyn Bridge so the potential buyer could build toll booths since it’s construction in 1883. 135 years later and still no tolls.


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The Briefly for August 31, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, J’Ouvert, Electric Scooters, and More

The weekend’s subway changes (the L train is running), the Brooklyn-Queens streetcar project is a long way from starting, “Jewtropolis” in maps, moving Central Park’s horse carriages away from cars, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Everything you need to know about subway changes this weekend and Monday.

The official information on J’Ouvert on Monday. Get a preview of someone of the elaborate preparations.

Gothamist looked at all the New York State Senate campaign websites so you don’t have to.

Meet the rebellious women of NYC in the 1800s.

For a few hours in Uber, the Weather Channel, Snapchat, and others, New York City’s name was changed to Jewtropolis. Whoops.

Dockless electric scooters from Bird have made their debut in the city with the first program taking place in Bed Stuy.

The Mayor’s lack of response to the hit and run that a killed four-year-old in Bushwick compared to everything that he has publicly done in response to the crash the killed a one and four-year-old in Park Slope tells the tale of two Brooklyns.

Some questions for the Governor after his debate against Cynthia Nixon.

The Department of Transportation proposed moving horse carriage pickups in Central Park to five spots within the park to decrease the amount of time they spend alongside cars.

The history of Brooklyn’s Caribbean carnival.

An evening in Washington Heights is documented with a photo essay by The Village Voice.

The plan for the BQX streetcar has been revised. The new plan would connect Astoria on one end to Red Hook and Gowanus on the other end has gotten smaller in scope (stops in Sunset Park were completely removed), will be more expensive ($1.3 billion more) and take longer (won’t be completed until 2029) than the original proposal in 2016.

Today’s NYC Ferry won’t make the trip, but one September day in 1910 and again in August 1911, Rose Pitonof swam the 17 miles from E 23rd St down to Steeplechase Pier in Coney Island.


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The Briefly for August 24, 2018 – No M Train This Weekend, the Central Park Ghost Bus, A City of Vigilantes, and More

Park Slope’s Ninth St redesign is almost complete, Marty Golden has a hall of fame worthy bad idea, a Queens chef wins ‘Chopped,’ and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

There’s no M train this weekend, the 167th St B/D station will be closing until January starting on Monday, but this weekend is not an L train mini shutdown. 6sqft has all this weekend’s subway changes.

Waave is a new yellow taxi-hailing app that will be available next week. $0.50 from each ride through Waave goes to the MTA and $0.30 will go towards the Taxi Improvement Fund, which is dedicated to adding more handicapped accessible cabs. Get used to saying “it’s like wave, but with two-a’s”

The man who has terrorizing an E 72nd St apartment building, Farris Koroma, turned himself in. Koroma had fired a gun at the building multiple times from Roosevelt Island.

The L4 is a new bus route aimed at easing the L train shutdown. It will originate neat the Bedford stop on the L, go over the Williamsburg Bridge, go up First Avenue in Manhattan to 14th, and turn down Second Avenue to head back to Brooklyn. This is the fourth new bus route specifically for the shutdown.

This might be in the hall of fame for bad ideas. State Senator Marty Golden plans to introduce legislation that would pay bystanders $500 when they help police when they having “violent confrontations with people resisting lawful arrest.” Break out your nunchucks, because vigilante justice is starting to pay!

Park Slope’s Ninth Street redesign is almost complete, which is about six months from the fatal accident that sparked the calls for a protected bike lane and narrowed traffic lanes. How did it get done so quickly? Being a few blocks form the mayor’s house may have helped.

John Lennon’s assassin, Mark David Chapman, was denied parole (for the tenth time).

Is the Central Park West shuttle bus a ghost?

Daniel Jackson, a 39-year-old FDNY lieutenant, has been arrested and faces suspension for punching his wife in the face and throwing her into the bushes near their Bronx home.

Luna Park in Coney Island announced an expansion, which won’t be ready until 2020. Rumor has it that the amusement park’s current employees weren’t told about the expansion.

Go down under with these 13 good Australian cafes in NYC, from Curbed.

David Waldman, a lawyer in the U.S. Attorney’s office, pleaded guilty to an “extensive cyberstalking and threats campaign”—which started in 2014. He will be sentenced in November. He was in a relationship with the woman he was harassing for four months before he started his four year campaign against her.

One of Spa Castle’s owners, David Chon, pleaded guilty to attempted tax fraud charges, and Spa Castle will have to pay $2.5 million for cheating the system by under-reporting income.

Melvin “Boots” Johnson, the owner of Queens Bully in Forest Hills, was recently crowned champion on “Chopped,” winning a spot in the $50,000 Grill Masters grand finale.


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