The Briefly for August 15, 2019 – The “Renaming Trump Tower’s Address to Barack Obama Avenue” Edition

High-end buildings are competing for the best amenities, the NYPD giving citations for imaginary bike lane laws, another 14th St busway lawsuit and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

As 87% of NYCHA homes were without heat at some point last winter, there is a battle being waged amongst the city’s wealthiest to see who can out-do each other with the highest of high-end amenities. (The Real Deal)

The top twelve secrets of Prospect Park. (Untapped Cities)

Do you want to sign the MoveOn.org petition to rename Fifth Avenue between 56th and 57th “President Barack H. Obama Avenue?” It just so happens that is the block where Trump Tower is located. (MoveOn)

NYC Broadway week is September 3-16, and you can get 2-for-1 tickets to 24 different shows. (amNY)

The city and state’s fight against the federal government about the public charge rule is centered around a ridiculous interpretation of the Emma Lazarus’s sonnet “The New Colossus,” which is inscribed on the Statue of Liberty. (Patch)

Only 5 of the 25 LIRR stations in Queens are not ADA compliant and City Comptroller Scott Stringer wants answers and timelines from the MTA to rectify that. (LIC Post)

In praise of stuffed-crust pizza, Hootie and the Blowfish, and Dirty Dancing on VHS as 500 Pizza Hut stores are set to close. (Grub Street)

State Sen. Andrew Gounardes is looking to craft tougher laws to close the arbitrary distance between killing someone with or without a car being involved. (Brooklyn Paper)

A field guide to the weapons of the city’s hostile architecture. (Gothamist)

13 festivals coming to the city from this week through Columbus Day Weekend. (amNY)

After sharing a very obviously racist video, the Sergeants Benevolent Association President and local racist Ed Mullins literally used the “I have black friends” defense. (Gothamist)

If Patti Smith, Morrisey, or Bruce Springsteen on Broadway aren’t your vibe, maybe Tom Morello Off-Broadway in September is more your speed. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A kitten dodging traffic on the lower level of the George Washington Bridge has a happy story to tell and is now available for adopting in New Jersey. (Gothamist)

Riding a horse on a beach isn’t a “very Brooklyn” thing to do, but it’s totally possible. (NY Times)

New York Public Radio (WNYC, WQXR, WNYC Studios, Gothamist, and the Greene Performance Space) has a new CEO in Goli Sheikholeslami, the current CEO of Chicago Public Media. (Gothamist)

The latest lawsuit against the 14th St busway argues the MTA’s removal of bus stops along the route as part of the select service upgrade violates the Americans with Disabilities Act. (amNY)

169 lawsuits were filed in the city during the first day of the Child Victim’s Act, including cases against the Boy Scouts of America, the Catholic dioceses, and Rockefeller University. (Patch)

Okay, so the summer is coming to a close soon. What do you do with your air conditioner? (Gothamist)

If you’re headed to Jacob Riis beach this Saturday but don’t want to be far from Emmy squared’s delicious Detroit-style pizza, you’re in luck, because the Clinton Hill/Williamsburg pizzeria is “delivering” between 1 and 1:45 pm. (Time Out)

A second NYPD officer committed suicide this week, the ninth NYPD suicide in 2019. A name has not yet been released. (amNY)

Video: Headmistress and burlesque dancer Jo Weldon on found freedom, fun and her calling in underground nightlife. (Huff Post)

A Space Jam mural was painted on the basketball court at Rodney Park North in Williamsburg, but the paint that the Parks Department used made the court slippery and unusable. (Brooklyn Paper)

A sanitation worker swapped out the license plates on his car with a set he found in the trash and almost got away with $17,000 in tickets and fines, but he was caught by the Department of Investigation. (Patch)

From The Onion, but you almost might think it was true: NYPD Tickets Dead Cyclist For Obstructing Bike Lane. (The Onion)

This sounds like it could be The Onion, but this is real. Alex Goldmark (from NPR’s Planet Money) was pulled over on his bicycle and given a citation for riding outside of the bike lane on a street where no bike lane exists, which is not illegal. It would be funny if it weren’t an example of the NYPD not having an understanding of the laws they are supposed to enforce. (Patch)

Time Out updated their list of the “best New York pizzas you have to eat” but #3 is inside of their own food hall, so be wary. (Time Out)

The Briefly for July 29, 2019 – The “Are Inflatable Rats An Endangered Species?” Edition

Crown Heights looks for an upzoning compromise, how much you need to afford a two-bedroom apartment, Gil the guide dog learns the subways, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Clumsy, overcooked and pointless.” Moulin Rouge on Broadway isn’t winning over critics. (amNY)

Inside the Department of Sanitation’s Certified Organic Recycling (CORe), which probably smells just lovely, where they are turning the city’s food scraps into methane that will be used to heat homes and run in natural gas lines. (Bushwick Daily)

A fifth NYPD officer since June has committed suicide. Commissioner James O’Neill declared a mental health crisis in June in an attempt to fight the stigma of seeking help. (NY Times)

Don’t leave your unwanted pets in the city’s parks, they don’t have the survival instincts necessary to stay alive. A rabbit was rescued from Prospect Park. Larry the bunny is in a foster home in Bergen Beach. (Patch)

Is the inflatable protest rat an endangered species? (Gothamist)

Amazon continues to make headlines whenever the company looks at office space. After abandoning the Long Island City HQ2 idea and One Court Square’s million feet of office space, they’ve continually looked for a smaller space for their current NYC employees. The latest location is the old Lord & Taylor building on Fifth Ave, which is currently owned by WeWork. (Curbed)

Has street flooding during rainstorms always been this bad? The city’s construction boom is contributing to the floods. (Gothamist)

An attempt to answer the question “why is the city so loud?” (Viewing NYC)

How much should you be earning to afford a two-bedroom apartment in the city? According to the Department of Housing and Urban Development, it’s $162,857, but when was the last time you knew anyone to only spend 30% of their income on rent? (6sqft)

Advocates in Gowanus are proposing the idea of an Environmental Special District to prevent any new construction due to a possible rezoning to prevent adding more wastewater that would end up in the canal, potentially spoiling the ongoing Superfund work. (Curbed)

The latest location for a flower flash was one of the city’s last phone booths on the Upper West Side, which was the subject of the children’s book The Lonely Phone Booth. Blink and you’ll miss it because flower flashes sometimes last only a few hours. (Gothamist)

Another week, another entry into the 100+ point health inspection violation club. Among the restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health is Jorge’s in Ridgewood with 124 points. (Patch)

Find every Privately Owned Public Space in the city with this map. (Viewing NYC)

After 20 years, Park Slope rents will finally drive gay bar Excelsior out of business for good. (Bklyner)

The city is suing American Airlines for violating its paid sick leave laws, passed in 2014. (Gothamist)

Come for the photos of Gil, an eight-month-old Labrador retriever, stay for the story of a guide dog learning how to navigate the subways. (amNY)

City Council Members Jimmy Van Bramer and Daniel Dromm celebrated the New York Public Library’s new $564 million budget with Drag Queen Story Hour, which will receive $25,000. (Jackson Heights Post)

A dispensary grows in Brooklyn. (6sqft)

Crown Heights is experiencing something rarely seen in the city: an attempt at a compromise between two competing plans when it comes to the future upzoning of the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Which is worse: Rodents or roaches? (Splinter)

A shooting during a Saturday night block party in Brownsville resulted in 11 wounded and one dead. (Huff Post)

A body was discovered in the waters under the Verrazzano Bridge on Sunday afternoon. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Rising rents may be an issue, but the next retail crisis will come from rising property taxes, which are up 71.6% since 2009. (Patch)

Raising a child in NYC costs more than sending that same child to a four-year state college. (Patch)

The millions of dollars the city has wasted on paying for roof work which should have been free in NYCHA buildings would have been better spending lit on fire to replace the failed heating systems. The spending on roofs still under their warrantees was discovered by City Comptroller Scott Stringer. (NY Times)

Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney is requesting the mayor have a Canyon of Heroes parade for the survivors and first responders of 9/11. The mayor called it a “great idea.” (Patch)

Sometimes you just want to look at photos of baby animals, and that’s okay. Here are some newborn owls and ospreys born in the city. (Gothamist)

In response to the backlash over some police officers having water thrown on them, the political right (and the president) are demanding respect for the NYPD. Josmar Trujillo asks “Have they earned it?” (Gothamist)

The five best ice cream sandwiches in the city. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for July 9, 2019 – The “Attack Rats Leaping From Trash Piles” Edition

Vision Zero is “working” with three deaths in two days, the Jeffrey Epstein case, visualizing your awful subway commute, ice cream in Bushwick, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

What do the city’s weed dealers think about Albany’s failure to legalize marijuana? Most of the ones Gothamist spoke to seemed to be behind the idea of legalization, even if it means changing their business. (Gothamist)

Get “disinfected” at The Museum of Booze. (Atlas Obscura)

We’ve got enough problems before we have to start dealing with rats leaping from the trash. (Patch)

Bastille Day is nearing, do you know how to celebrate? (Grub Street)

The Governor signed a bill into law that will allow the release of President Trump’s state tax returns. (NY Times)

A good way to get shot by an NYPD officer is yelling “Die!” while also yelling that you have a gun. (Patch)

A new tool from The New York Times will visualize how unpredictable your subway commute is so you can quantify your misery. (NY Times)

The Guggenheim Museum on the Upper East Side was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site, one of eight Frank Lloyd Wright buildings that received the honor. (Curbed)

8 Frank Lloyd Wright houses in the city, mapped. (Curbed)

What you need to know about Wednesday’s ticker-tape parade for the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team. (6sqft)

In a move that is both horrifying and also not surprising, the Department of Health let the Housing Authority appeal inspectors’ discovery of lead in apartments, leaving children exposed to lead in some cases for years. (Curbed)

For the second time in a month, someone set fire to one of the rainbow flags outside the Alibi Lounge on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard in the Bronx. The state’s hate crimes task force is investigating. (amNY)

What would the city look like if sea levels rose 100 feet? Mostly underwater according to this map. (Viewing NYC)

A day in the life of Váyalo Cocina’s Ana Fernandez, who came to the United States from Venezuela on vacation and stayed seeking asylum with her wife and sister. You can find Váyalo Cocina at Smorgasburg in Williamsburg on Saturdays (NY Times)

One week into Mayor de Blasio’s major enforcement action against vehicles blocking and parking in bike lanes. Let’s check in to see how it’s going on Second Ave. (Streetsblog)

In what seems like a test to everyone along the L line, the MTA announced that for 9 weeks of nights and weekends there will be no L train service between Lorimer St and Broadway Junction starting July 16 and ending October 4. (Greenpointers)

There’s a whole neighborhood between DUMBO and the Brooklyn Navy Yard. 10 things to know about Vinegar Hill. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Inside the drama, comedy, and tragedy of producing theater outdoors across the city. (amNY)

The federal case against Jeffrey Epstein is centered on his Upper East Side Mansion, where prosecutors say he sexually abused dozens of underage girls in a yearslong sex-trafficking conspiracy. (Patch)

Epstein has pleaded not guilty. (Gothamist)

Inside Epstein’s Upper East Side Mansion, which is one of the largest private homes in Manhattan. (NY Times)

The NYPD plans to launch a peer counseling program later this year in an effort to improve cops’ access to mental-health resources after a string of four suicides in June. (Patch)

Take a video tour of MAD Magazine’s offices as the publication will cease printing new material this summer. (Gothamist)

A look inside the lawsuit the Cabán campaign filed, which highlights a lack of trust in the Board of Elections. (QNS)

The mayor still believes that Vision Zero is “working,” despite three people being killed by drivers in the last two days. (Gothamist)

The city is expanding its initiatives designed to encourage green rooftops after no landlord received a tax credit for it in 2018. (amNY)

8 ice cream spots in and around Bushwick. There are that many ice cream spots in and around Bushwick? Bushwick is whatever you want it to be. Maybe there are a million places to get ice cream in Bushwick and you’ve just never seen them all. (Bushwick)

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