The Briefly for June 22, 2020 – The “An Answer to Our Collective Fireworks Question” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: NYC starts reopening phase two, Tuesday is primary day, the only true New Yorker, an NYPD cop uses an illegal chokehold, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

A boy caught a 20-pound catfish in Central Park using a bagel as bait. When we have conversations about who is a “real” New Yorker, this catfish deserves to be a part of the conversation. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Tuesday is a 2020 primary in New York for much more than the Democratic presidential nominee. Here’s your guide to the local races. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you applied for an absentee ballot and it hasn’t arrived, here’s what to do. (Brigid Gergin for Gothamist)

This weekend was the breaking point based on everyone in the city going to Twitter to complain about fireworks. Firework complaints are up 230x in June. What the hell is going on? (Sydney Pereira, Beth Fertig, David Cruz, Jake Dobkin, and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Believe it or not, there’s a real answer to what the hell is going on. According to Dave Hill, all of the fireworks shows in the Northeast have been canceled and fireworks vendors are up to their ears in pro-grade fireworks. Thanks to supply and demand, dealers have turned to the black market and are trying to unload their fireworks for any price. (@DaveHill77)

“Everywhere I go it smells the same, and it smells like my breath.” Let’s check-in with David Sedaris. (Sarah Lyall for NY Times)

A guide to phase two’s reopening. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Phase two means something big: Offices are open once more. If companies decide to reopen their offices? That’s a different story. (Michael Gold and Troy Closson for NY Times)

A 1.9-acre waterfront park and small beach is coming to the Bushwick Inlet Park, which was approved by the Parks and Waterfront Committee of Brooklyn’s Community Board 1. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Looking for a piece of history off the beaten path? Check out Jackie Robinson’s house on Tilden Ave. (Untapped New York for Michelle Young)

After 96 days, Governor Cuomo’s daily press conferences have come to an end. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

Half of New York’s working-class immigrants have lost their jobs as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, according to a new study by the Center for Urban Future. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

How many days has it been since the passing of the Eric Garner Chokehold Ban? An NYPD officer was suspended without pay after being caught on video using an illegal chokehold on an unarmed Black man in Queens. (Mark Hallum and Zach Gewelb for amNewYork Metro)

86.4% of tickets for biking on the sidewalk in 2018 and 2019 went to Black and Hispanic New Yorkers, even though they comprise only 49 percent of cyclists. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Dominique Alexander was found hanging from a tree last week in Fort Tryon Park in Manhattan, his death was ruled a suicide. Alexander’s death is one of many deaths of Black men that have been ruled a suicide after being found hanging from trees. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There were reports of three nooses being hung in Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx on Juneteenth. The NYPD declined to open an investigation, claiming the ropes were nothing more than harmless string. This is the second investigation into a noose left in a city park that the NYPD has refused or closed without a thorough investigation. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Vincent D’Andraia, the cop that was suspended for showing a protester to the ground and was charged with misdemeanor assault has a history of 11 allegations of misconduct since 2015. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

Students at predominantly Black New York City schools are significantly less likely to have a positive view of school police or to believe school discipline is applied fairly. If that’s your assumption, there’s a new study that confirms your assumption. (Jessica Gould, Alex Zimmerman, and Gabrielle LaMarr LeMee and Gothamist)

New York City’s education oversight board is calling for public schools, not the police, to manage the officers stationed on city campuses. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

“The Case for Self-Enforcing Streets” from Transportation Alternatives argues that the NYPD should be removed from traffic enforcement, calling for an expansion in enforcement technology, changing how crash investigations work, and more. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Hundreds of protesters marched on Astoria Blvd in Queens demanding the removal of the Christopher Columbus statue. (Angélica Acevedo for amNewYork Metro)

The American Museum of Natural History expressed plans to have the statue of Theodore Roosevelt removed from its entrance on Central Park West for its racist depictions of Native American and African figures. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

While we’re talking about statues, let’s encourage the Long Island town of Babylon to tear down their statue of Robert Moses. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

“Mayor de Blasio could have acted all along. He could have called for the NYPD to make officers’ disciplinary records public. He could have fired Officer Pantaleo immediately after he murdered Eric Garner. Mayor de Blasio knows how this all works, but benefits from the opaqueness that characterizes the political system in this city and state. He has amplified the problem with the system.”
-New Kings Democrats, Mayor de Blasio is neither progressive nor effective. He needs to resign

Juneteenth will become a city holiday in 2021. (Marina Fang for HuffPost)

Photos: Juneteenth celebrations across the city. (Sophia Chang, photos by Angela Chalmondeley, Khaleeq Alfred, and Gretchen Robinette for Gothamist)

NYC Parks installed “Juneteenth Grove” at Cadman Plaza Park “in celebration of Juneteenth and to celebrate the homegoing of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and countless others.” (Mary Kim for Brooklyn Heights Blog)

Downtown Brooklyn and Park Slope are getting new bike lanes this summer on Smith St, Fourth Ave, and Navy Street. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Another week and another local racist caught on camera. This time it was in Flushing Queens where a man with a face mask pulled down yelled slurs at a South Korean student inside a 7-Eleven. The NYPD’s Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

It’s been 63 years since the legendary brawl at the Copacabana that involved six hall of fame Yankees and their wives while celebrating Billy Martin’s birthday. Finally, the truth has come out. (David Margolick for NY Times)

The Yankees and Mets have announced that their, uh, “spring” training will be happening in New York and not Florida. (Priscila Korb for Patch)

Is wearing a mask getting in your way of drinking? Check out Crook & Marker’s TasteMask, which includes a flap for a straw. (Bao Ong for The Out)

Thanks to reader Hannah for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 29, 2020 – The “Cherry Blossom Drone Footage Will Relax You” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The MTA attack Mayor de Blasio over the city’s homeless, large crowds violate social distancing at a rabbi’s funeral, the beer delivery guide, and more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 56˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Unemployed, A Brooklyn Bartender’s Lament. (Hope Morawa for New York Cliché)

The best bike rides in Brooklyn according to Jacqueline VanDusen, who has biked them all. (Nicole Davis for Brooklyn Based)

If you were trying to successfully reopen the state, would you think to invite James Dolan or Jeff Wilpon to the panel, the geniuses who have given us the modern Knicks and the Mets? (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Video: A drones eye view of the Brooklyn Botanical Garden’s cherry blossoms. (Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

The MTA is changing its policies to be more strict when it comes to the homeless population. It will no longer allow shopping carts in stations and no one will be allowed to spend more than an hour on the platform before they are asked to leave. Clearly whoever wrote these guidelines has never tried to leave Greenpoint at 3 am on a Wednesday night. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The Mayor should get out of his car and into the subways so he can see what is really going on and solve the problem of his own making.” -MTA spokesperson Abbey Collins. The mayor has failed to live up to his own standards and has blown his own self-imposed deadlines to place 2,500 of the city’s homeless population into hotel rooms by April 20. He missed that deadline by 1,500. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Add Nathan’s to the list of companies who returned their federal small-business loans. Nathan’s had received $1.2 million. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

RIP Tina Girouard, a 1970s SoHo art scene pioneer. (Randy Kennedy for NY Times)

New York’s unemployment offices are backlogged and 400,000 New Yorkers are still waiting for their MArch unemployment checks. The state has a 3,000 person staff who have delivered $3.1 billion to about 1.5 million people so far. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

It hasn’t been an easy road, some errors from the unemployment office resulted in personal information, including social security numbers, being mailed to the wrong people. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Rough Trade NYC shut down music sales when the store was shut down. A month later and they’re back to selling music, online only. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Worried that your fluffy buddy may have COVID-19? Here comes the NYC COVID-19 Pet Hotline. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

What’s open? Here are a few maps showing what’s open in a few neighborhoods across the city. (6sqft)

Veniero’s and Veselka in the East Village will be open for delivery starting Friday. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

RIP Dr. Lorna Breen, medical director of the emergency department at New York-Presbyterian Allen Hospital in Manhattan, who died by suicide. (Nina Golgowski for HuffPost)

At the East end of Delancey St there’s an N95 mask vending machine. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Half of NYC knows someone who died from COVID-19, according to a new Siena Research Institute poll. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

Nancy Blum, whose beautiful mosaic work adorns the 28th St station n the 6 line is releasing ornate coloring book pages for free. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Mayor de Blasio’s special councils to help reopen the city are small businesses; larger businesses; public health and healthcare; arts, culture and tourism; labor; nonprofits and social services; faith-based; and education and vocational training. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Apartment Porn: Inside Sister Parish’s $3.5 million Fifth Avenue Maisonette. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

Every student in kindergarten lower and middle schools will either meet standards/need improvement system when it comes to grades this year, essentially a more polite pass/fail. If you “need improvement” you’ll be receiving it in summer school. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Squibb Bridge, which connects Brooklyn Bridge Park to the Brooklyn Promenade, will be op en on May 4, after replacing the previous incarnation, which was structurally flawed. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

CityMD Urgent Care is now offering walk-in tests for COVID-19 at all of their locations across New York City. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

Photos: The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds flyover. (Photos by Dean Moses)

Not everyone was a fan. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Is New York City a city full of idiots? The flyover, which was supposed to be in tribute to the region’s medical workers, must have been so spectacular that a whole lot of New Yorkers forgot social distancing guidelines. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Brooklyn parents say underground yeshiva classes are flourishing in Borough Park — but cops closed a 311 grievance about one in just 16 minutes in the middle of the night. (Reuven Blau and Yoav Gonen for The City)

The NYPD had to disperse a crowd attending the funeral of Rabbi Chaim Mertz. The mayor appeared in person to oversee, as multiple funerals in Brooklyn’s Jewish communities have required NYPD intervention in the last two months. I give the mayor a lot of shit on a regular occasion, but attempting to enforce social distancing without being called an anti-Semite in this situation was absolutely impossible. This kind of gathering and what happened with Tuesday’s flyover are both completely preventable, but no one called the NYPD or mayor nazis or compared them to Wilhelm Frick for dispersing crowds after the flyover. (Liam Stack for NY Times)

Photos of the funeral’s crowd size and density are very different from the photos of the flyover crowds. (@ReuvenBlau)

The signs are still pointing to an Andrew Yang mayoral bid in 2021. (Matt Stevens for NY Times)

The beer delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thank you to reader JoAnn for today’s featured flyover photo!

The Briefly for April 2, 2020 – The “Is Governor Cuomo’s Nipple Pierced?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Governor Cuomo shuts down playgrounds, a map of infections by zip code, Ina Garten makes an appropriately sized margarita, free coloring books, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 57˚
Clear throughout the day.

Don’t ask AOC to make a TikTok. (@AOC)

Farmers’ markets are still happening across the city, but with stricter rules. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

The Right to Counsel NYC Coalition and Housing Justice for All have released a guide for tenants interesting in organizing a rent strike. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The NYS Bar Association and the state’s Unified Court System announced they partnered to create a network of pro bono lawyers willing to help out with the surge in legal matters that are expected to come out of the coronavirus pandemic and the likely economic fallout. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

One of the weirder things to come out of this whole pandemic will be the unanswered question “Is the governor’s nipple pierced?” No one is shaming the governor, I think we all need something to distract us from the state of the world for a few moments. (Jelisa Castrodale for Vice)

Sanra Lee, his ex-girlfriend, took to Instagram to talk about it and while she didn’t say they were pierced, she didn’t deny it either. (Charlie Nash for Mediaite)

Queens’ demographics may be the reason why it has become the epicenter of the city’s coronavirus outbreak. (Clodagh McGowan for NY1)

The city released hard numbers of positive COVID-19 cases per zip code, exposing the tale of two cities as wealthy neighborhoods have rates at 44%, while lower-income zip codes have infection rates as high as 77%. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Imagine you move into a 600-square-foot Manhattan shoebox apartment and two days later the two of you are locked down together. (Anne McCarthy for HuffPost)

“I basically want to address the idiots out there, and you know who you are.” Watch Larry David’s COVID-19 PSA. (Devon Ivie for Vulture)

Spring break is canceled for public schools. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“During a crisis, cocktail hour can be almost any hour.” -Ine Garten, hero. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Representatives Carolyn B. Maloney and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez have added their voices to the cause of ending the ban on blood donations from gay and bisexual men. (LIC Post)

The New York City burger delivery guide. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Video: Lower Manhattan’s skyline from 1903 through today. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

In the state’s budget, which passed on Wednesday night, is the legalization of electric bikes and scooters in the state, allowing municipalities to regulate electric bikes. Electric scooters that travel up to 15 miles per hour are legalized. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Also in the budget is a new state campaign finance system, with public matching money for candidates who choose to participate and lower individual contribution limits. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Say farewell to legal weed in 2020. The state failed to put it in the budget last year. A good lesson in not procrastinating. (Rebecca C. Lewis, Amanda Luz Hanning Santiago for City and State)

What New York City looked like, including a startling infographic about daily deaths, during the 1918 flu pandemic. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

You can now call 311 to report physical distancing violations. Of the 289 complaints in Manhattan in the first three days of the week, the NYPD “took action” on 88 of those complaints. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

A man in the Bronx attempted suicide-by-NYPD after receiving a COVID-19 diagnosis. After multiple warnings, the NYPD shot the man in the stomach and is in stable condition at NYC Health & Hospitals/Jacobi. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Former Police Commissioner James O’Neill is returning to public service to be a senior advisor in charge of distributing medical equipment and protective gear to city hospitals. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

210 of Coney Island Hospital’s 317 beds are full of COVID-19 patients and the facility is low on staff, gear, and space, as each employee is being issued one masks every five days. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Mayor de Blasio waivered on closing down the city’s playgrounds, Governor Cuomo did not. All playgrounds, swing sets, basketball courts, and similar spaces are closed. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Mayor de Blasio continues to be a punching bag in the media and doesn’t help himself when his public wavering constantly ends with Governor Cuomo making difficult, but right, decisions. This Times piece starts with an anecdote about Mayor de Blasio walking in Prospect Park on the morning of April 1, which means he was driven from the Upper West Side to Park Slope just to walk in Prospect Park when Central Park is one mile away. (Ben Smith for NY Times)

Love to color? Here are a few free coloring books from NYC artists. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!