The Briefly for March 27, 2020 – The “No One is Stopping You From Leaving” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The best to-go cocktails available, hospitals begin to share ventilators, the Brooklyn Navy Yard steps up, restaurants become wine shops, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 64˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 46˚ High: 56˚

Okay, real question. How do we do our laundry now? (Sanam Yar for NY Times)

Here’s what you can and can’t do in the city right now. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

When the governor announced that the state would be making 100,000 gallons of hand sanitizer a week using prison labor, we were a little short on details and we still are. The sanitizer is being bottled in state prisons by Corcraft, the public-facing brand name of the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision’s Division of Industries, but as the reporting has discovered, it’s unknown where it’s actually being produced. (Katie Way for VICE)

The summer is approaching, when the city’s wealthy abandon our streets and flee upstate and to the Hamptons. Despite calls for a vacation home travel ban, the governor has no plans to put one in place. (Erik Engquist for The Real Deal)

Here are the streets the city will close this weekend to give us some space. There is one closure in each borough. One. Instead of creating more space for us to stretch out in, the city has created one destination inside each borough, especially the six blocks of Park Ave in Midtown. I predict this pilot program will be hailed as a success because of this weekend’s rain and not because one street in each borough was closed. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

If you’ve got a bike gathering dust, donate it to someone who needs it. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Choice bike rides in each borough, even if the weather this weekend isn’t looking great for a leisurely ride. (Lillia Panych for Untapped New York)

It seems we can’t be trusted with basketball courts without breaking physical distancing guidelines, so the basketball hoops in 80 parks across the city have been removed. (Greenpointers)

For the third time this week a Trader Joe’s store, the Chelsea location, is closed due to multiple staffers testing positive for COVID-19. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The story of one couple who saw the ban on partners in the delivery room at NewYork-Presbyterian, left the city. (Catherine Pearson for HuffPost)

Revel quietly expanded its service area into Manhattan, above 65th Street, and doubled the area in Brooklyn and Queens. Healthcare workers can receive free rides by registering online. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Where to find a birthday cake in the age of the coronavirus. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Imagine you’re a college student and you’re given 24 hours to vacate your dorm room. Now Imagine the world went to shit while you were on Spring Break and you never went back to the college because all classes were held online. If you don’t live near the city, how do you vacate your dorm room? What if you’re a student who lives abroad but is studying in New York? What do you do with 24 hours to go home? (Dylan Campbell for Gothamist)

Some restaurants with expansive wine catalogs are pivoting during the pandemic and becoming impromptu wine shops, offering a selection of bottles that would otherwise be difficult to find. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

Hey drivers, don’t be idiots just because the roads are clear. Exactly what this city doesn’t need is more people in hospitals, like this five-vehicle accident on Ocean Parkway. (Julianna Cuba for Streetsblog)

Governors Ball is canceled. Refunds are available or you can transfer your ticket to next year. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Legal Aid filed suit against New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services Wednesday requesting the immediate release of 22 teens, ages 13 through 17, held on Family Court charges at detention facilities. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

“I never thought I would write those words, but I do miss the tourists.” Is it crazy to miss the tourists on the Brooklyn Bridge or are we all yearning for the resemblance of normalcy? (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

The Freelancers Union is launching the Freelancers Relief Fund, a direct aid fund that will help independent workers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic so they can pay for their expenses like rent, utilities, and groceries. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Advice: What you can do if you can’t pay your mortgage or rent due to the pandemic. (Cate Corcoran for Brownstoner)

Where to get sushi delivery and takeout, mostly in Manhattan. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Amateur Night at the Apollo is going all digital. (Devi Lockwood for NY Times)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard has sprung into action during previous world wars and crises, and this is no different. Bednark, a manufacturing company, is churning out thousands of face shields a day. Kings County Distillery and perfume company DS. & Gurga are making sanitizer and tailor Kingsbridge is making face masks. They didn’t call it “The Can-Do Shipyard” for nothing. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Photo: You approach a roll of pristine toilet paper on the street. What do you do? (EV Grieve)

The Four Seasons Hotel in New York City will be providing health care workers responding to the coronavirus pandemic with free lodging. (Jenna Amatulli for HuffPost)

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital has begun sharing ventilators between two patients because “the other option is death.” (Brian M. Rosenthal, Jennifer Pinkowski and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

RIP Fred “Curly” Neal, one of the Harlem Globetrotters’ biggest stars. (Marc Stein for NY Times)

The Tenement Museum is struggling to stay afloat, as the COVID-19 shutdown eliminated foot traffic and steady funding. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

The best to-go cocktails available right now at bars and restaurants in NYC. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The Briefly for March 18, 2020 – The “Mom and Dad Are Fighting Over Quarantine” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Uber Pools are banned, NY ramps up COVID-19 testing, the Night Mayor makes a request, price gouging becomes illegal, Whole Foods needs bikers, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 53˚
Rain overnight.

Today’s free stream from the Met Opera is Puccini’s La Bohème. Be patient, as their website is being inundated with people wanting to watch.

Ridgewood’s Nowawadays is streaming every night at 8pm.

Caveat’s free programming tonight is Nerd Nite.

Governor Cuomo is the guest on today’s edition of The Daily podcast from the Times. (Michael Barbaro, produced by Austin Mitchell, Adizah Eghan and Lynsea Garrison for NY Times)

The late-night shows are off TV, but they’re not off YouTube. Colbert gave a monologue from the bathtub while wearing a suit, of course. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

We all knew this would happen. The governor and mayor had been showing a unified front against the pandemic for almost a week, which is too long for their often strained relationship. Mayor de Blasio made waves by claiming that a shelter-in-place order might be coming in the next two days, but Governor Cuomo made certain to publicly state he’s the only person that can make that order and has no plans to quarantine any city. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

Mayor Bill de Blasio was so intent on keeping city libraries open during the coronavirus outbreak that he went as far as making veiled threats about cutting their funding if they closed. What a leader. (Sally Goldenberg and Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

“Our schools are important, he said. Here’s what we heard: Our lives are not.” -An editorial from Emily James, an NYC teacher looking at the last few weeks. (Emily James for HuffPost)

How to get around NYC safely during the coronavirus pandemic. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Uber, Via and Lyft pool rides in NYC are banned. The only people who should be getting into cars together are “real couples,” according to the mayor. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

What about Access-a-Ride? The MTA has made no such ruling, despite Access-a-Ride customers being among the city’s most vulnerable. The MTA is “working on it.” (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

Ridership is down 60% on the subways and 90% on commuter trains and the MTA is seeking a $4 billion federal bailout. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

This is how we know it’s a true problem: Alternate side of the street parking has been suspended. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Here’s how takeout alcohol sales work. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

$100 a tray for Japanese Hokkaido uni. Omakase boxes starting at $50. Can luxury restaurants go takeout? (Erika Adams for Eater)

What is a restaurant? Is the corner store that mostly serves pupusas a restaurant? A close-up with Mirna’s Pupuseria in Flatbush as they face their future in our new reality. (Ligaya Mishan for NY Times)

Is it possible to govern while socially distanced? We’re getting closer and closer to the due date for the state’s budget on April 1 and assemblymembers are being told to keep their distance. (Fred Mogul and Karen De Witt for Gothamist)

It’s like August in March. The 1% are heading to the Hamptons and spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to rent houses. (Kevin Sun for The Real Deal)

There have been a lot of comparisons to the 1918 Spanish Flu when talking about COVID-19, especially when saying that it became dormant in the summer and came back like the evil in the fall. How did NYC survive the 1918 Spanish Flu? (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The Brooklyn DA will not prosecute low-level offenders to reduce the number of people exposed to COVID-19. (Brooklyn Paper)

Video: A walk down a mostly empty Broadway in Astoria. (ActionKid)

It is illegal for any store to raise the price for any product or service that could limit the spread of coronavirus by 10% or more. We can thank the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection for the new rule to prevent price gouging. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

If you can ride a bike in the city, there may be a job for you. Whole Foods is looking for cyclists to deliver groceries. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

By Thursday, the city’s capacity for COVID-19 testing will be up to 5,000 tests a day. That doesn’t mean that anyone who wants a test will get one, but it means that people who should have been tested already will finally be tested and we can move forward from there. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re working from home and the apartment feels lonely, please remember that you can still foster a dog or cat. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

Four players for the Nets have tested positive for COVID-19, including Kevin Durant. (Joe Patorno for amNewYork Metro)

Bandcamp is waiving their cut of sales to show support for artists. If you’ve got a favorite band and want to show some support, go buy some mp3s. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Comic book readers: Call your local shop to see if they are accommodating curbside pickup for your new books this week. (George Gene Gustines for NY Times)

Photos: You know who doesn’t care about the coronavirus? Christo and Amelia, the Tompkins Square hawks. (Laura Goggin Photography)

Some people won’t ever listen, even if it means putting their entire community’s lives at risk. The FDNY broke up a Hasidic wedding in Williamsburg on Tuesday after more than 200 people were in attendance. In the same building, a school was in session. The Times goes out of its way to state that these kinds of events are influenced by the teaching of “extremist leaders” and do not represent the Hasidic community. (Liam Stack and Nate Schweber for NY Times)

Headline: “Brooklyn Ultra-Orthodox Community Faces Spike In Coronavirus Infections, Urgent Care Center Confirms” 🤔 (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Office of Nightlife is gathering information on the impacts for workers, performers, contractors, and businesses from COVID-19-related business closures and event cancellations. Please fill out the survey. (Nightlife Mayor Ariel Palitz)

The Bowery Ballroom and Mercury Lounge have put together a GoFundMe for their 100 staff members. (GoFundMe)

Philippe G. Massoud, chef-owner of ilili and ilili Box has a GoFundMe to provide dry and canned foods, diapers and other necessities to his 130 staff and families. I’m not sure how I’m going to keep covering these GoFundMe efforts. There are hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers who need help right now. (GoFundMe)

If you’re connected to a bartender or server or restaurant on social media, no doubt you’ve seen the requests for tips or support in whatever way is possible. The federal government has created out of thin air an additional $3 trillion-plus to flush into the economy. Where the hell is the help for the service industry? (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Friday’s looking to be a 70-degree day. Here are the 12 largest parks in the city so you can go outside but keep your distance. (Untapped New York)

Brief hits:
RIP Carolyn Egger, killed by a driver over the weekend in Jackson Heights. The driver was not charged. (Streetsblog) | A virtual tour of the Brooklyn Museum’s ‘Studio 54: Night Magic’. (Brooklyn Based) | The fight over the Atlantic Yards is not over. (The Real Deal) | A time-lapse video of the once-in-a-decade Agave titanota’s bloom, at the New York Botanical Garden. (Viewing NYC) | The gym ban applies to the gym in your residential building. (The Real Deal) | How to digitally borrow books from the NYPL. (Time Out) | Yes, my band does have a Bandcamp page, thanks for asking. (Bad Bloom)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for March 13, 2020 – The “How Does A Strip Club Fight COVID-19?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: COVID-19 in NYC, the secret gardens of the Upper West Side, new restrictions on gatherings, Broadway is closed, there are no more pro sports, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 66˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 35˚ High: 55˚

Video: Four of six candidates for Queens borough president debated at Queens College on March 9. (Angélica Acevedo for QNS)

The Palm steakhouses have been owned for 93 years by the family that launched them, but they have sold to the company that owns the Rainforest Cafe in a $45 million deal. (Serena Dai for Eater)

360° Video: From the top of Edge NY’s outdoor deck. (Action Kid)

The Coney Island Polar Bear Plunge raised $60,000, which was distributed to multiple community organizations, including the New York Aquarium, the Alliance for Coney Island, Coney Island USA, the Coney Island History Project, Coney Beach Brighton Beach Open Water Swimmers, New York State Marine Education Association, New York City Parks Foundation, the Coney Island YMCA, and Parachute Literary Arts. If you ever wondered “why does anyone do that?,” this is the benefit of having a wild idea on January 1. (John Alexander for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The title is 12 buildings that should be brought back, but if you’re looking to explore some of old New York’s masterpieces, here are 12 of them. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Bronx Brewery in planning a second location in the East Village on Second Ave between 3rd and 4th. The location should be opening in the fall with a brewery, live music, and a kitchen with “special guest” chefs. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The best restaurants in the West Village, because we’re not all going to be making all of our own meals in perpetuity. (Bryan Kim, Katherine Lewin, Hillary Reinsberg, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Conor McGregor donated $1 million to the first responder Steven Siller Tunnel To Towers Foundation to make good on a 2018 promise. (amNewYork Metro)

If you’ve got plans to binge the Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, you might ask yourself, “If I were her friend, where would I live?” and also “Could I afford it?” Here are your answers. (Localize.City)

The secret gardens of the Upper West Side. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)


I won’t list things that are closing but assume that everything, everything pro sports and everything Broadway, is canceled or postponed unless you explicitly hear otherwise, with the exception of city schools, the Queens borough president election, and the census. Before going anywhere or doing anything, please call and confirm.

The state’s public emergency health plan has two prongs: reducing the spread and treating the infected. “There is no end date.” (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: The mayor’s press conference about the coronavirus outbreak on Thursday afternoon was somber and reassuring at the same time. If you have the endurance to watch over 90 minutes, the video is available. (NBC News)

The Archdiocese of New York announced it was closing all of its elementary schools for at least a week and would reassess the situation on March 20. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Early voting in the Queens borough president’s race starts on Saturday. Is the city ready for its first coronavirus election? (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Subway ridership is unsurprisingly down 18.65% from a year ago as as many people as possible are staying home. (Dana Rubinstein for Politico)

The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Late Night with Seth Meyers, The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, Last Week Tonight, and The Daily Show with Trevor Noah are joining most daytime shows in filming without studio audiences moving forward. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

I got a text from a friend yesterday that the school nurse for their school was out and one of their students was displaying signs of a fever and coughing. He told me his school didn’t have a backup plan aside from sending the student home immediately.

COVID-19 is showing is just how woefully unprepared our school nurse situation is. The city plans on hiring enough nurses to distribute one in each building by today, but these nurses will be contractors with the city and as a result will be unable to access students’ medical records. Not an ideal situation for making medical decisions. (Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

When people stop showing up to a senior center like the Open Door Senior Center over COVID-19 fears, it doesn’t mean they aren’t in need of a meal. How do you provide a meal to someone staying home in fear? ( Gabriel Sandoval and Claudia Irizarry Aponte with additional reporting by Josefa Velasquez for The City)

If we’re all going to be seeing more of the inside of our apartments more, maybe it’s time to tackle some of those long-standing projects we’ve been thinking about. The story of how Lauren Rothman was unable to change to a different apartment, so she changed her apartment. (Lauren Rothman for Curbed)

The state’s finances are based on economic growth, which means the next fiscal year, which starts on April 1st, is completely screwed by COVID-19, which will have years of ramifications for the state. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Advocates are worried undocumented New Yorkers will be scared to seek medical help for COVID-19 symptoms. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

No matter what you heard early in the day on Thursday, the child who self-reported as having COVID-19 in the Bronx does not have the illness and the school they attended will be open on Friday. The school system may explore a “summer school model,” with a limited shutdown. (Sophia Chang, Jessica Gould, Yasmeen Khan for Gothamist)

There’s gonna be a lot of beer that goes undrank and a lot of corned beef that goes uneaten on St Patricks Day. (Erika Adams for Eater)

No gathering of more than 500 people can happen in New York and the legal capacity of just about everywhere has been cut in half. In addition, the mayor said that MSG and the Barclays Center should be expected to be closed for months. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Restaurants will have to reduce their capacity by 50% as part of the new preventative measures put in place. The mayor re-iterated while outlining the new policy that this could be a six0month health crisis with a longer economic recovery period. The city is offering no-interest loans, but this crisis is going to be absolutely apocalyptic for the city’s restaurants, which already operate on slim margins. (Serena Dai for Eater)

A longstanding New York trade organization representing restaurants is calling for the state to offer tax breaks and cap food delivery service fees — in addition to a host of other requests, as the industry prepares for drastic economic consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. (Erika Adam for Eater)

Alex Jones, a human backflowing sewer pipe and conspiracy theorist, was selling toothpaste, creams and several other products that claim to treat or prevent and cure COVID-19 on his website. Attorney Letitia James immediately sent him a cease and desist. (Noah Higgins-Dunn for CNBC)

How does a strip club like FlashDancers handle an outbreak like COVID-19? (Tribeca Citizen)