The Briefly for September 20-21, 2020 – The “Don’t Call This A Staycation” Sunday Edition

Sunday’s NYC news digest: A potpourri of news, a RBG statue, City Hall’s annual report card, what we miss from pre-pandemic NYC, how to pack an emergency bag, and more

Today – Low: 52˚ High: 64˚
Clear throughout the day.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be honored with a statue in Brooklyn. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

NYC’s legal community reflects on RBG’s life and work. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

It feels insulting for for the city to push an advertising campaign that New Yorkers should “staycation” in New York City. Turns out when you remove the tourists from midtown, we still hate midtown. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The MTA has issued exactly zero summonses for mask non-compliance. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The anatomy of an NYC protest. Which role do you play? (Juliana Kim and Simbarashe Cha for NY Times)

New York City’s school reopening plans are still missing a key ingredient: enough teachers. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Parents and students react to the city’s constant waffling about the start of the school year. This feels like trying to read all of your summer reading in the weekend before school starts. (Sophia Chang, Gwynne Hogan, Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

The de Blasio administration released a 420-page document tracking City Hall operations for the last year. Murders are up. Juvenile arrests are up. Violent incidents in jails are up while population is down. The “excess death” rate” suggests the death toll from Covid-19 might be well over 50,000. NYPD response times are up. Response times for emergency complaints in NYCHA buildings is up. The homeless population increased. The good news? Rat complaints are down and there were new bike lanes built. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The report “Discipline in the NYPD 2019” outlines, but doesn’t detail, 339 cases in which officers faced departmental charges. Cops pleaded or were found guilty in 322 of those cases. Only 27 lost their jobs. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Murderinos: Look no further than your own backyard. The untold story of the Tompkins Square murder. (David Swanson for Village Voice from 1989)

Businesses around Yankee Stadium held a rally Thursday afternoon demanding that the city renegotiate the lease and tax deal that Yankee management worked out to stay in the Bronx under the Bloomberg administration, claiming that extra money obtained through the negotiation could help keep businesses surrounding the stadium stay afloat until fans are able to return to the stadium. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The 2020 fall foliage map. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

At the crossroads of art and commerce is the controversy at the Whitney, who canceled an exhibition of arresting responses to the pandemic and Black Lives Matter protests after artists of color criticized the Whitney for acquiring their work without consent and through discount sales. (Zachary Small for NY Times)

A look at how Governors Island could become a climate center for the city. (Michael Kimmelman for NY Times)

The mayor, possibly unaware that he is the mayor, made public comments about how outdoor dining “should become permanent.” Will he walk the walk or just talk the talk? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The pandemic tax? City Council voted in favor of giving restaurants the option to add a 10% charge to bills as an economic recovery support measure. The mayor supports the bill and once he signs it, it will be in effect immediately until indoor dining returns to full capacity. I guess the city’s response to us asking it to help restaurants is “help them yourself.” (Erika Adams for Eater)

If the last few years have seen the food world grapple with systemic issues like pay disparities, culinary credit, tipping, and harassment from either big-time chefs or everyday customers, the poorly regulated return of indoor dining — during a deadly pandemic, no less — feels like a middle finger to hospitality workers.
-Ryan Sutton, chief food critic for Eater, NYC’s Indoor Dining Comeback Fails Restaurant Workers. Here’s Why. for Eater

The city’s first store dedicated to Covid-19 essentials opened in Herald Square. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A new report from Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office found that 57 percent of dogs tested at city-run shelters developed respiratory disease during their stays, among other troubling findings. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The NYPD is working with the Trump administration to blame violent crime on bail reform by bringing federal charges instead of local charges against people suspected of involvement in shootings. The NYPD’s own data shows a lack of a link between bail reform and the increase in violent crime, but the truth has never stopped the NYPD of Trump administration before. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The mayor announced he will force his staff to take an unpaid one-week furlough between October 2020 and March 2021 to save money. It will save under a million dollars. The mayor is currently looking for a billion dollars of savings or will lay off 22,000 city employees. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Wanna buy a T. rex skeleton? Stan, the T. rex, is up for auction on October 6 at Christie’s. (Zachary Smalls for NY Times)

Photos: Sunnyside has become the home of fairies. No, really. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Where to eat outside in Prospect Heights. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

A love letter to the 1993 Super Mario Bros movie, a movie about two brothers from Brooklyn. (Charles Pulliam-Moore for Gizmodo)

Indoor pools will be able to open on September 30 at 33% capacity. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Apartment Porn: A $16.5 million Upper East Side townhouse with a miniature pool and a roof garden. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

More than 170 New York City transit workers have been harassed or assaulted for asking passengers to wear masks. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

38 glorious Chinese restaurants open right now. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It’s not uncommon to see people sitting outside libraries in an attempt to use the free wifi. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Columbia’s marching band disbanded itself for “a history riddled with offensive behavior.” (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

Bankruptcy will not stop New York Sports Clubs from charging you your monthly fee. The state attorney general’s office is investigating. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Trick or treating is nor canceled this year, ensuring the scariest Halloween of all time. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

There will be no snow days at all this year, as classes will move to remote learning in case of snow. (Amy Zimmer for Chalkbeat)

Dante in Greenwich Village, voted world’s best bar by Time Out) is now offering canned cocktails. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

In praise of Gloria’s Caribbean, a Crown Heights mainstay. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s real estate market has been hotter than Manhattan’s, pre- and post-pandemic. (Kael Goodman for amNewYork Metro)

Time Out looks back to the 10 things we miss the most about the Before Times in NYC. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: “Doggy Bags” brings giant dog sculptures to the Garment District. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

How to pack an emergency bag. Just in case. (A. C. Shilton for NY Times)

NYC’s most anticipated restaurants openings of fall 2020. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Briefly for September 15-17, 2020 – The “Flesh Eating Bacteria? Who Cares, It’s 2020” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Industry City’s rezoning, the number of Covid-19 positive tests in schools increases, where to eat outside in Park Slope, and more

Today – Low: 61˚ High: 68˚
Clear throughout the day.

This isn’t NYC specific, but Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren fired Police Chief La’Ron Singletary, demonstrating that some mayors know how and when to yield their powers. (Michael Wilson and Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

Photos: Behind the scenes in Chinatown. (Molly Tavoletti for RESY)

New York City’s highways, reimagined in a subway map. (Zirocket on r/NYC)

We’re inching closer to normal because the F train is closing on nights and weekends for construction. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

It’s not all bad news for the subway, there’s a new escalator in Union Square on the L platform. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Five Connecticut residents were hospitalized with a flesh eating bacteria after going in the water in the Long Island Sound this summer” barely even was a blip on the radar. What a year. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Can you help identify this woman, who had a shitfit in a Verizon store when told to wear a mask, throwing around the N-word as she left the store? In a city with so many assholes, she still managed to be the asshole of the week and it’s only Tuesday. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Want to ride the subway or bus without a mask? Get ready for a $50 fine. Next question: Will they fine the NYPD when they ride without masks? (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

NYU’s dorm Rubin Hall is on lockdown after 4 students tested positive for Covid-19. (Matthew Fischetti and Trace Miller for Washington Square News)

Photos: The “new” Chelsea Flea opened over the weekend. (Scott LYnch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn Public Libraries in Midwood, Kensington, Mill Basin, Walt Whitman, Washington Irving, and the Annex in Dumbo are open for grab-and-go lending. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The City Council will vote on the Industry City rezoning today. City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, whose district contains Industry City, has come out against the rezoning. The City Council usually defers to the local councilmember for these decisions, but multiple members have come out against his stance. (Greg David for The City)

What’s happening to us? New York City’s zip codes don’t even touch the ten most expensive zip codes in the country. (Tim Moran for Patch)

Photos: Baby lynx cubs in the Queens Zoo! (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The Cloister Cafe was shut down by the SLA in August du to social distancing violations by its patrons but reopened this week thanks to a temporary restraining order against the suspension by a judge. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The story of how the police unions, full of white Republicans who live in the suburbs, betrayed the city they are supposed to serve by endorsing President Trump. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

The year in (sad) photos. (Tribeca Citizen)

The NYPD takes a full minute longer to respond to shootings and other crisis incidents than they did a year ago. Ambulances are arriving faster than ever before. (Suhali Bhat for The City)

A new vegetarian burger spot, Pop’s Eat-Rite, is opening up a block from Superiority Burger. I, for one, look forward to this burgeoning vegetarian burger district. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Farewell to Coyote Ugly, whose original location is officially gone, but it sounds like a new location is coming. (EV Grieve)

Photos: I’ll never not link to photos of goats mowing the grass. (Forrest Michael Bomann for Untapped New York)

The MTA is betting big on the federal government bailing them out to the tune of $12 billion. The rest of us live here on earth. (Jose Martinez for The City)

The Thanksgiving Day Parade isn’t happening. Let’s just go take a nap until it’s 2021. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Want to ask the 2021 mayoral candidates a question? Here’s your chance. (The City)

This isn’t new, but sometimes I think about how Governor Cuomo said he changed his mind about the L train because someone yelled at him on the street. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist in 2019)

Satire: Help! I’m Being Priced out of the Neighborhood I Gentrified. (Graham Isador The Hard Times)

“Teaching has a powerful way of consuming your time that is antipode to the stay-at-home summer of 2020. I’m optimistic that the new school year will sweep away my grief — grief for the hardship and loss my students experienced these past few months, for not being there to offer hugs and high fives, for missing yearbook signing and graduation photo swapping, and for a lackluster farewell. I trust that the new school year will bring with it acceptance, even as I hold on to the wonderful young learners who have filled this classroom with laughter and wonder before.”
Krisy Lawlor, a teacher in the Bronx, My classroom is a time capsule , for Chalkbeat

Last week the number was 19, this week 55 school employees tested positive for Covid-19. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The state threatened to cut 9,000 jobs from NYC school less than one month ago. (Reema Amin for Patch)

Monday, the mayor announced the city will hire 2,000 additional teachers to meet the demands of blended learning. 2,000 is extremely short of the 10,000 teachers the principal’s union called for to make blended learning possible. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

School nurses are reporting that they’ve yet to receive any PPE for the school year. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

42% of NYC students opted for remote learning, up from 26% a few weeks ago. (Lauren Cook for PIX11)

A look at the next Bowery Mural from Mojo, in progress. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Turns out New York’s most famous guitar teacher Dan Smith will still teach you guitar. A story of how Smith is teaching former Governor David Patterson to play guitar. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Expect a marketing campaign to persuade you to vote for Joe Biden under the Working Families Party, as without either 130,000 votes or 2% of the total vote, the Working Families Party will lose ballot access. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Where to eat outside in Park Slope. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Helene for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 11-12, 2020 – The “Let’s Eat Some Indoor One Dollar Sushi” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Indoor dining is coming back to NYC, sixteen teachers test positive for Covid-19 before students come back, outdoor happy hours, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 81˚
Rain and humid throughout the day.

16 New York City teachers have tested positive for Covid-19 in 16 different schools. Schools open on September 21. (East New York News)

Photos: Inside the abandoned City Hall subway station, which served as the inspiration for the Turtles’ lair in the second Ninja Turtles movie. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Times asks the impolite question: What happens when no one invites you into their quarantine pod? (Ronda Kaysen for NY Times)

September 30, indoor dining is back at 25% capacity. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Indoor dining will increase to 50% on November 1 if cases don’t significantly increase, just in time for outdoor dining to end on October 31. The state and city, of course, are giving restaurants less than a month to get their indoor areas ready and overhaul their HVAC systems. Many restaurants will have to make a choice is opening their doors at 25% capacity is financially worth opening their doors at all. (Erika Adams for Eater)

An epidemiologist weighs in on the question of how safe is indoor dining? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

There’s a new Whole Foods in Brooklyn, but no one is allowed inside. (Chris Crawley for Grub Street)

Okay, let’s jump into this. Is dollar sushi any good? (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: A $5.75 million brownstone in Harlem with a secret garden. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Activists are calling on the MTA to fire two of their employees, Willion Wurm Jr and William Wurm, who drove through demonstrators near Times Square during a Black Lives Matter protest this summer. The MTA will not fire the employeees. (Stephan Nessen for Gothamist)

A look at the CDC’s eviction moratorium for tenants who can’t pay rent and make under $99,000 annually. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Farewell to the Hilton hotel in Times Square. (Rich Bockmann for The Real Deal)

What could make your commute worse between Bedford Ave and Manhattan? Someone who is FaceTiming the entire time. The L train tunnel is the first train tunnel to get cell signal. (Greenpointers)

Meet Jenny Olbrich, the Greenpoint’s Pizza Girl. (Greenpointers)

A look at the “For ⟶ forever” mural by Mierle Laderman Ukeles that’s on display outside the Queens Museum. (Jane Margolies for NY Times)

Delaware, Maryland, Ohio, and West Virginia were added to New York’s quarantine list for travelers. (NY1)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer officially kicked off his 2021 mayoral bid on Tuesday with a speech taking aim at the city’s real estate industry. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

It’s that wonderful time of the year again: It’s time for goats to cut the grass. (EV Grieve)

As the title says, “Everything you need to know about NYC’s Open Streets Restaurants program.” (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

A 15-year-old Brooklyn boy was charged on Tuesday with five counts of attempted murder in a J’Ouvert shooting that left a 6-year-old boy, his mother, and three men wounded. (Ed Shanahan and Ashley Southall for NY Times)

James Gordon Bennett Medal is one of the FDNY’s highest honors, but it’s named for the published of The New York Herald newspaper, who pushed racist and segregationist views during the Civil War. The award will be renamed in honor of Chief Peter J. Ganci, who was the highest-ranked uniformed member of the FDNY killing in the 9/11 attacks. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Christian Cooper, the bird watcher who had the police called on him for insisting a dog be put on a leash. has turned his experience into a graphic novel about racism. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

Did you miss the earthquake that happened early in the morning on Wednesday? Yes, there was an earthquake. Just toss it on the pile for 2020. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Angry Upper West Siders that threatened to sue the city after homeless shelter residents were temporarily moved into neighborhood hotels are celebrating the decision to move the 300 residents of one hotel back into traditional shelter facilities. NIMBY indeed. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Patricia Marroquin Norby is the Met’s first-ever full-time Native American curator and will assume the role of associate curator for Native American art. (Sarah Bahr for NY Times)

The Covid-19 pandemic hit NYC neighborhoods the hardest that were already experiencing the greatest rent burden, according to new research from StreetEasy. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Meet “Red Rage” Assistant Chief Christopher McCormack, who has the most credible misconduct allegations of any NYPD officer. Over a dozen Black and Latino men accused McCormack of touching them inappropriately during searches or ordered others to do so. Despite the complaints, he kept being promoted. (Joaquin Sapien for The City)

A guide to Central Park’s “Great Trees.” (Amanda Quaid for Untapped Cities)

Some gyms are open in the city, but indoor fitness classes remain banned. A group of boutique fitness studios is suing the city for $250 million in damages over the ban (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Ride the subway without a mask? $50 fine. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Century 21 declared bankruptcy and will be closing its stores. (Christopher Bonanos for Curbed)

A new study from the CDC says adults with Covid-19 were twice as likely to say they ate at a restaurant. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Tiffany Cabán launched her campaign for City Council for district 22, which encompasses Astoria, East Elmhurst, Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Rikers Island. If she wins her election, it would put her in control of rezoning Rikers Island after it has been vacated. (Clarissa Sosin for Queens County Politics)

The outdoor happy hour guide. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)