The Briefly for July 13, 2020 – The “A Summer Without Street Fairs” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Public libraries are opening, the first day without a Covid-19 death since March, the MTA looks for ideas, the NYPD steals streets, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 86˚
Clear throughout the day.

You’ll see some headlines that some areas of Queens are seeing a 58% or 68% positive rate for antibodies. While this seems like good news, having antibodies is no way to guarantee that you can’t get the infection again or even that you’ve had the infection in the past. The hope would be that neighborhoods may develop herd immunity. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

The city has not built up herd immunity, which is the message from Jay Varna, the Senior Advisor for Public Health, NYC Mayor’s Office, and a vast majority of New Yorkers are still susceptible. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city’s ban on events means a summer without street fairs. This also includes Celebrate Brooklyn!, the Dominican Day Parade, San Gennaro, and the West Indian-American Day Carnival. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

As you might expect, the Electric Zoo 2020 has been canceled. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Saturday was the first day since March 13 that no one was recorded as dying due to the coronavirus. Since March 23,283 were reported dead. (Nick Visser for HuffPost)

A look at the more difficult side of the Occupy City Hall, as the organizers have realized that their roles include caretakers for dozens of the city’s homeless that have taken to making their home in the occupation. (Alan Feuer, Juliana Kim and Byron Smith for NY Times)

Kudos to Sasha Baron Cohen, who hasn’t let the pandemic stop him from freaking out Rudy Giuliani so badly that he called the police. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

An overview of The Montefiore Family Resilience Fund, which supplies assistance for households that have lost a breadwinner or caregiver to Covid-19. The fund will assist 375 families. (Norwood News)

Officer Ernie Moran, an off-duty NYPD cop was arrested in Queens during the early hours Wednesday morning for harassing and stalking his ex-girlfriend. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Mayor de Blasio’s cuts to the NYPD included killing off the parking placard abuse unit, ensuring that he will do absolutely nothing as a mayor to end this form of low-level corruption from the NYPD. The mayor and the City Council have announced multiple initiatives to curb this type of corruption, but literally nothing has been done so far. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The NYPD has seized streets all across the city that are adjacent to station houses. Why? Don’t ask the mayor, who refuses to confront the NYPD on this theft of public space. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Is the Staten Island Ferris wheel returning from the dead? The details haven’t been released, but it seems like a smaller version of the original idea might still have life. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Financial struggles brought on by the coronavirus pandemic will keep 15 Catholic schools across New York City closed for good. (Alex Mitchell and Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA is turning to the public for ideas for how to keep trains and buses virus-free. Have any ideas? (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

A look at the work of the Brooklyn Conviction Review Unit, whose job it is to correct hundreds of years of wrongful convictions in Brooklyn of Black and Latinx Brooklynites. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

“We take responsibility for what happens in our stores—both on and off our sales floors—and we are committed to doing the work to improve how we treat our employees and customers.” Greenlight Bookstore co-owners Rebecca Fitting and Jessica Stockton-Bagnulo have made a public apology for creating an unwelcoming environment for Black customers and employees. (Brooklyn Reader)

15 New York City pools that will be reopening in August. (Jenna Fanelli for amNewYork Metro)

Here’s what a car-free, pedestrian-friendly NYC could look like., according to a plan from Architect Vishaan Chakrabarti and his firm Practice for Architecture and Urbanism. (Davin Gannon 6sqft)

Another look at the mass die-offs of fish in the Hudson river. A combination of sewage being dumped into the waters, lack of rain, and the heat are creating an extreme situation leading to the massive deaths of fish. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Wo Hop returns today for takeout orders. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Who isn’t filling out their census forms? It might be the rich. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Jose Barrera, a 50-year-old Brooklyn man was fatally run over in Borough Park while unloading his car outside his home on Saturday night. The driver was taken into custody, passed a DWI test, and was released without being charged Barrera is the 29th pedestrian to be killed by someone driving a car in 2020. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Video: Drone footage of NYC’s Black Lives Matter murals. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Alt-side parking is suspended until July 19. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

22 public libraries in the city are reopening today. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

14 unique outdoor dining options. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Nai for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 9, 2020 – The “They Don’t Call it a Subway Doomsday for Nothing” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor’s plan for schools in September, the worst place in NYC, wait times for Covid-19 test results slip, frozen boozy drinks, and more

Today – Low: 76˚ High: 85˚
Humid throughout the day.

What’s the worst place in NYC? Seems there’s some consensus around Penn Station. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Despite what he may think, the president doesn’t actually have control over how the city’s schools operate. Mayor de Blasio’s plan, which is only a plan, is still subject to the state’s approval. Early August is the state’s deadline for approving or modifying the city’s plan. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s schools are facing $642 million in budget cuts. The city’s private schools received tens of millions of dollars from the federal government’s PPP program. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The mayor announced his plan for school openings in the fall. His plans call for a partial reopening this September. Classroom attendance would be limited to one to three days a week. While it’s a burden for children, teachers, parents, the economy, and everyone involved, it’s a burden that is not worse than death, which is what his plan is hoping to prevent. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

A deeper dive into the options already presented for the city’s schools for in-person learning. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Here’s a terrifying map of what the city’s subways could look like if the MTA doesn’t get any federal assistance and uses the Riders Alliance 2010 “Doomsday on the MTA” report. To accommodate the loss in revenues, the MTA would have to cut the 1, 2, 3, 7, B, D, F, M, G, J, Z, and Franklin Avenue Shuttle. They don’t call it doomsday for nothing. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Things were already projected to be bad for the MTA, but for each tax dollar the city doesn’t collect, the MTA is pushed further and further into the economic abyss. The MTA’s projected tax revenue for 2021 will be $1.4 billion lower than expected. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The subways shut down for four hours a day and that may seem inconvenient, but a transit strike in 1966 shut the subways down for two weeks. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

A Queens driver hit and killed 64-year-old Richard O’Flaherty in Far Rockaway on Tuesday. The driver was not charged. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Governors Island will reopen on July 15th for “passive recreation” from 10 am – 7 pm. You’ll need tickets in advance and they can be reserved beginning on Friday. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Apartment Porn: It used to be a school, now it’s a $22.5 million penthouse with four bedrooms, a two-level terrace, and a double-sided marble fireplace. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos: Why the hell is the NYPD protecting statues of Christopher Columbus across the city 24/7? (Gerch Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Someone driving an SUV drove through a crowd of protesters in Times Square, sending at least one to the hospital. The driver was taken into custody, but not arrested or charged. If the NYPD can do it with initial mayoral support and no consequences, what’s to stop a citizen from doing the same thing? (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

New York Attorney General Letitia James is calling for an “entirely new accountability structure” for the NYPD, including reducing Mayor Bill de Blasio’s role in overseeing the force. Under James’ recommendation, a commission of the City Council, Public Advocate, Comptroller, and the mayor would have control over the NYPD’s budget. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The development announced for the failed Amazon HQ2 site has hit a wall: City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. Without Van Bramer’s support, the project’s needed rezoning can’t happen. Long Island City’s newly constructed apartments are 60% empty. This plan would bring an additional 2,700 apartments to the area. Van Bramer’s idea for the land is simple: it’s public land and should be used by the public. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

8 tips for negotiating your lease renewal in NYC. (Localize.City)

In an article about how graffiti is on the rise during the Covid-19 pandemic, the Times starts by saying the conditions are perfect for “a new generation of graffiti writers.” The Old Gray Lady indeed. (David Gonzalez for NY Times)

The city’s oldest gay bar, Julius’ Bar, launched a GoFundMe campaign to keep the bar and it employees afloat until indoor dining comes back, which may be a while. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The availability for Covid-19 testing has increased across the city, but the availability of labs to process those tests hasn’t risen to meet the demand. As a result, wait times for test results have slipped from the three-day range to upwards of a week. Is your result still relevant if it’s been a week since the test? (Elizabeth Kim and Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Where to pick up food near Central Park. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The staff at Jack the Horse in Brooklyn Heights are accusing the owners of misusing thousands of dollars in donations intended for employees. The GoFundMe states (errors and all) “We still hoping to raise money to support our wonderful staff who are out of work due to COVID-19.” The owners paid food and alcohol vendors and insurance bills with the $15,000+ of donations to the GoFundMe. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A five-story building partially collapsed in Murray Hill on E 38th in Manhattan on Wednesday afternoon. One person was injured and was brought to the hospital. (Ben Yakas and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

What’s your favorite pre-pandemic food? (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

A few NYC holy grail apartments: 2 bedrooms for under $2,000 a month. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

The story of how an Angela Davis quote ended up being displayed prominently towards the Barclays Center subway entrance. (Norman Oder for BKLYNER)

The Board of Elections in New York City turns Election Day into Groundhog Day—we see the same problematic deficiencies each cycle: despite a bipartisan cross-ideological desire to fix them, they reoccur like clockwork. The time has come to use the important expansion of vote-by-mail to finally fix these consistent problems.
– City Councilmember Carline Rivera, Voting by mail must be expanded to fix existing problems

Interactive Map: More than 13,000 Manhattan-based businesses secured loans of more than $150,000 from the federal government through the Paycheck Protection Program. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Major League Soccer announced the schedule for their summer tournament and NYCFC’s first game is today (Thursday) morning at 9 am. (Joe Pantorno for Bronx Times)

RIP Jane Walentas, the artist behind the three-decade restoration of Jane’s Carousel in Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

Twenty places across the city to enjoy nature. (Jenna Fanelli for Bronx Times)

The city will only retain 50 of its 95 park rangers, thanks to the city’s budget cuts. In a budget of $88.2 billion, the cuts to the park ranger program are saving $10 million, or 0.01% of the budget. (Reuven Blau for The City)

13 places to get frozen boozy drinks in Astoria. (Claire Leaden for We Heart Astoria)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 8, 2020 – The “Manhattan is the Actual Worst (at Socially Distancing)” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city begins counting absentee ballots, a 28 second NYC horror movie, assigning blame for gun violence, a look at PPP loans in NYC, and more

Today – Low: 74˚ High: 84˚
Rain in the evening.

A complete NYC horror movie in only 28 seconds. (/u/NewYorkShenanigans)

Dog runs have reopened. (Angi Gonzalez for NY1)

Who’s the worst at socially distancing? We’re looking at you, Manhattan! (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The city’s absentee ballots, by the numbers. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Absentee ballots will begin to be counted in the Bronx, Queens, Manhattan, and Brooklyn today (Staten Island started their count on Monday), and everyone is getting ready to challenge votes like it’s the 2000 election and we’re in Florida. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

There is no official count of New York children who have lost a parent or caregiver to the virus — and even less idea of how the city will help support the likely hundreds or more kids who have suddenly suffered a life-altering loss. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

A look at the data of how the federal government’s Payroll Protection Program’s loans were distributed. The top three zip codes for loan approval were in Greenpoint, Park Slope, and Brooklyn Heights. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The International Culinary Center and the Institute of Culinary Education will be merging. Calling it a “merger” may be generous, the ICE has no plans of expansion and announced nothing when it comes to ICC’s faculty. The ICC is planning on closing its doors but will allow the current students to graduate before doing so. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Other cities may be bouncing back from the massive amount of people filing for unemployment, but in New York City unemployment is near 20%, forcing at least a million people out of work. With jobs tied to the city’s reopening and the city’s reopening tied to the country’s recovery, it doesn’t look like the city will be bouncing back soon. (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

These are the measures that NYC courthouses will take to prevent the spread of Covid-19. Get used to seeing thermometers everywhere. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The mayor pledged 100 miles of Open Streets in May, and he is now touting that New York has the most Open Street mileage of any city in the country. That seems to have led the project to prioritize raw mileage over a holistic view of how people and communities want to use their streets or any sense of what conditions it takes for an Open Street site to be successful.
-Sasha Aickin for Streetsblog, ‘Open Streets’ Isn’t Working for All of the People

A Brooklyn man was indicted for allegedly smuggling hundreds of ancient Egyptian artifacts through JFK earlier this year. This is the second-worst Indiana Jones movie ever. (NBC News New York)

Summer school officially kicked off Monday, but some of the 143,000 students enrolled in the remote program have yet to start their coursework due to technical glitches. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer unveiled a plan to reopen the city’s schools, including smaller class sizes, mandatory masks for all teachers and students in second grade or higher, realigned scheduled for remote learning, restricted movement within schools, and more. The plan also calls for at least one full-time nurse at each school in the city. (Robert Pozarycki with Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The “37th Avenue Sidewalk Cafe Coalition” is calling on the city to simplify the permit process for sidewalk seating on a permanent basis. (Allie Griffin for Jackson Heights)

In an attempt to close the digital divide in low-income communities of color, the city will expand its “Internet Master Plan” over the next 18 months to 600,000 more New Yorkers. The cost is $157 million, with $87 million of it is coming from the NYPD’s budget. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The Yankees and Mets will plan two exhibition games against each other on July 18 and 19. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Who wants to spend two billion dollars for a baseball team that loses $50 million a year? No seriously, who wants to buy the Mets? The Steve Cohen watch continues. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Speaking of losing money: Ruminating on if Uber’s purchase of Postmates deal is good for restaurants. One business that only loses money buying another that only loses money. What could go wrong? (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

How Black organizers fed the Occupy City Hall protests with restaurant and homemade meals. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The MTA is adding 9,000 more digital screens to subway stations to better inform people. Sorry, typo. I meant to sell more advertising. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: The fledgling hawks in Tompkins Square Park are beginning to explore outside the park, but the family is doing extremely well. (Laura Goggin Photography)

When Lambda Lounge in Harlem opens this weekend, it will become only the second Black-owned LGBTQ+ bar in New York City. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

22 places Lin-Manuel Miranda left his mark in NYC. (Hannah Nice for StreetEasy)

Privately run child care centers in New York City can reopen as early as Monday, about three months after the coronavirus forced 3,000 programs to shut their doors. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

City Councilmember Rory Lancman, representing central Queens, is calling on Mayor de Blasio to fire NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea for blaming the recent surge in violent crime on criminal justice and police brutality reforms. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

The mayor thinks that a majority of New Yorkers think more policing will mean that they’re safe. A recent Sienna poll points out that only 33% of New Yorkers said they feel “more secure” when they see a police officer. Who does the mayor think he represents? (James Ramsay for Gothamist)

“We have the knowledge to stop shootings; it’s unfortunate that most of our powers were taken away to stop the shootings. Knowledge is power? Well, we have the knowledge, we don’t have the power.” -Chief of Crime Control Strategies Michael LiPetri, committing a crime by murdering an idiom while looking to place blame anywhere but the NYPD for an uptick in shootings. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

“Crime has been going up since 2018. This was before there were any reforms around bail or there was a release from Rikers Island.” Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance has his own theories. (NY1)

“We’ve had violence that we haven’t seen in many years and the police strategy is to reduce crime. In the past few days, we’ve been trying to reimagine policing, by listening to the community, set up meetings with community leaders and find out what they value, their cultures, and give the community the police service they desire.” Chief of Community Affairs Jeffrey Maddrey isn’t here to win, he’s here to make friends. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Meet Touchy Blinky, a mobile interactive art/music/tech installation that is helping keep the East Village and the city weird. (Stacie Joy for EV Grieve)

Where to eat when it might randomly rain for twenty minutes. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Nai for today’s featured photo!