The Briefly for December 4, 2019 – The “Another Reason Not to Eat Sushi From Walgreens” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Mayor de Blasio says a new stupid thing, the most popular dog names in the city, a french fry shortage is on the horizon, the Rock Center tree, and more.

The city won’t reveal its master plan for the Sunnyside Yards at a traditional town hall meeting, instead favoring a digital town hall, requiring participants to register in advance. Does the EDC expect a massive turnout and couldn’t find an appropriate space or are they trying to suppress opposition to their plan? (Michael Dorgan and Christian Murray for LIC Post)

If you’re the Governors Ball-going type, tickets are available for presale and they’re dropping hints about the lineup on Instagram. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

There’s a recall of ready-to-eat sushi, salads, and spring rolls from Trader Joe’s and Walgreens due to a contamination of Listeria. Trader Joe’s has reported no illnesses and if you have contaminated food you can bring it back for a refund. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Is Hurricane Dorian going to cause a french fry shortage? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A cargo delivery bike pilot program will be announced today with Amazon, DHL, and Whole Foods among its participants. The bikes look to be part truck and part bike, but will take up a much smaller footprint in regards to carbon and parking. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

More info on the cargo bikes: They’ll be big, but also pedal assisted, allowed in commercial loading spaces, and will be concentrated from 60th to the Battery. (Winnie Hu and Matthew Hang for NY Times)

The process to make Rikers Island a public space kicked off this week to make way for the jail’s closing in 2026. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall is getting a $550 million remodel. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

Has Mayor de Blasio’s control over the city’s schools been effective? The state Assembly will hold a hearing on the 16th. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s coming to Off-Broadway this December. (Matt Windman for amNewYork)

Vending machines like the CVS machines in Union Square and Chambers St station is both a new and nearly 120 year old idea. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A holiday tipping guide: How much to tip your doorman, super, porter, and more. (Brick Underground)

New York spends the most per student than any other state in the country and has the 13th lowest graduation rate. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Quickly: What’s the different between hemp and marijuana? The Brooklyn District Attorney’s office doesn’t know either. Earlier this year they boasted about stopping 106 pounds of marijuana from hitting the streets, but it was hemp, and they arrested Oren Levy from Green Angel CBD under the same assumption. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’ll be easier to prove tenant harassment from landlords thanks to new bills signed into law by Governor Cuomo. The laws expand the definition of harassment, remove the requirement that tenants prove they’ve been physically hurt by their landlords, and increases punishment for landlords who try to force out rent-regulated tenants. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 Rockefeller enter Christmas tree. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

New Yorkers pride themselves on knowing the best alternatives. The best delis that aren’t Katz, the best pizza in DUMBO that isn’t from Grimaldi’s, the best food that isn’t outside your neighborhood, etc. Here are 20 Christmas trees that aren’t in Rockefeller Center. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A new public light installation at Brookfield Place called Light Up Luminaries creates a canopy of multi-colored, lit up cubes suspended from the ceiling with a “show” every hour. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

Lord & Taylor is returning to the city for two weeks in December in the form of a 2,400 square foot pop-up shop in Soho, a far cry from their 676,000 square foot Fifth Avenue flagship location that was shuttered at the beginning of the year. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

The NYPD has been shooting surveillance films of “individuals and enemies of the state” for decades and thanks to the Handschu agreement, over a hundred hours of digitized footage from the 1960s through the 1980s is available through the Department of Records & Information Services. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The laws passed on Tuesday are only the start of what advocates hope will be a fruitful 2020 session when it comes to rent reforms. Multiple bills addressing evictions, tenant protections and housing stability are still in-process in Albany. (Mark Hallum for amNewyork)

The mayor is venturing towards full-on idiot mode with every passing day. When asked if the NYPD should be allowed to publicly display Thin Blue Line flags on NYPD property, the mayor said “There’s a lot of Photoshop in this world, so we’ll see.” The Thin Blue Line flag has been adopted by neo-Nazis and white supremacists in response to the Black Lives Matter movement. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

40 inexpensive dining destinations. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New Yorkers speak 637 languages, and the Endangered Language Alliance has mapped them all. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Let’s start with the obvious, we did not arrest Wolverine.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

How much did your school’s PTA bring in last year? (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

The most popular dog names in the city and Max and Bella. You’ve gotta step up your dog naming game. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden is offering free admission Tuesday to Friday, noon to 4:30pm. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

At least five Rikers Island correction officers have been suspended as investigators examine their failure to stop an 18-year-old detainee’s suicide attempt. (Ed Shanahan and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

Where to go when you’ve eaten everywhere in Williamsburg. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for September 18, 2019 – The “Is Astoria the Coolest Neighborhood in the City?” Edition

How to make congestion pricing work, National Grid continues to hold customers’ service hostage, everyone hates the new license plates, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Elizabeth Warren hit Washington Square Park on Monday night to give a presidential speech on corruption. (NY Times)

Kopitiam is the only restaurant in the city to be on Bon Appétit’s 10 Best New Restaurants in America list. (Grub Street)

Time Out put together a list of the 50 coolest neighborhoods to visit in the world. On the list? Astoria. Here are three spots in Astoria to visit.(Time Out)

How will congestion pricing pay for the MTA’s 2020-2024 capital plan? A flat fee of $6.62 that could go up to $9.18 during the day and $3.06 at night and with no exceptions. (Gothamist)

Uber and Lyft drivers are showing their true power over the city with a protest against Uber and Lyft’s non-compliance with the state’s minimum wage laws by driving slowly in packs down some of the city’s busiest roads like FDR Drive and the Brooklyn Bridge. (Gothamist)

If you don’t have $11 million on hand, you can still see what an 11-room residence looks like in the Dakota on West 72nd Street. (6sqft)

The Department of Transportation is installing 50 public charging stations for electric vehicles across the city with each station being able to charge two vehicles. (Jackson Heights Post)

Six places to go apple picking near the city without a car. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“I am unequivocally against, and will never, ever, allow Industry City to move forward with a rezoning proposal through ULURP in the form that they submitted to the City Planning Commission in February earlier this year.” – City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca (Curbed)

Turns out 60% of voters polled are opposed to the new rule to replace license plates over ten years old. 75% of voters polled oppose the $25 fee for the newly designed plates. (Patch)

Donald Trump’s childhood home is up for auction in Queens. You’ve got until November 14 to bid. (Curbed)

National Grid continues to hold customers’ gas service hostage in protest of the state’s rejection of the billion-dollar Williams Pipeline that would terminate in the Rockaways over concerns it could contaminate the New York Harbor. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here are the views from the top of the city’s tallest residential building. (Curbed)

Is Sunnyside Yards the next Hudson Yards? (Greenpointers)

A food tour of Little Italy’s Feast of San Gennaro. (6sqft)

Rates of violence in Rikers Island is up across the board, including violence between inmates, inmates assaults against staff, use of force against prisoners, and use of force against adolescent inmates. (Politico)

The ten oldest and intact cemeteries in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The city has spent $673 million on NYC Ferry but hasn’t spent a dime on Citi Bikes. NYC Ferry averages 17,842 riders per day, Citi Bike recently hit a new record of 91,529 trips on Thursday, September 5. (Streetsblog)

Here’s who over 100 people will be crawling down 1.5 miles on Manhattan’s streets this weekend. (Untapped Cities)

26 of the Upper East Side’s best bars and resaurants. (Eater)

thanks to reader The Unisphere from Lindsey for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for September 16, 2019 – The “JUUL Miss Me When I’m Gone” Edition

Late-night subway disruptions, the MTA’s ballooning budget, the weekly restaurant closures, Rudy Giuliani’s divorce gets messy, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

It’s a short list of subways that will be disrupted late nights this week. Even still, if you’re on the 1, 4, A, E, or R trains, you’ll want to check before you make late-night plans. (Subway Weekender)

It’s possible that the Cuomo-Byford feud may be softening. (Politico)

The city will allow bicyclists to ride past the United Nations during the General Assembly, a departure from previous years. It still won’t be easy. Each bicyclist will have to pass a security checkpoint before proceeding. (Streetsblog)

The governor announced the state will ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes with an emergency ruling. (Politico)

The city will be showing off some early design concepts for the Sunnyside Yards. (Sunnyside Post)

The city is calling its renovation of Fort Greene “routine work” to avoid doing a full environmental review. The Sierra Club is leading a lawsuit against the city for the classification and lack of review. (Patch)

The photos of Battery Park as a wheat field are weird. In 1982 there were two acres of wheat planted as an art installation which also yielded a thousand pounds of wheat. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA was headed for a $392 million budget gap in 2020, but that was before the MTA decided to hire 500 additional police officers. (Politico)

The MTA’s on-time performance rate hit 84% last month from 68% the previous August. The future of the MTA is all in the 2020-2024 capital plan, which hasn’t been made public and will be voted on on October 1. (6sqft)

Where to have a last-minute fancy dinner. (The Infatuation)

“I’m sad to know that the hero of 9/11 has become a liar.” Is anyone surprised that Rudy Giuliani’s divorce is a huge mess? (Splinter)

Luxury apartments are changing the city’s skyline, but they aren’t selling. 25% of the luxury apartments built since 2013 have never been sold. (Gothamist)

Speaking of luxury apartments, there will be 700 new luxury apartments will be built in Dumbo as part of a development on a three-acre parking lot. (NY Times)

A class-action lawsuit over a lack of wine coolers in luxury apartments in Hudson Square. (Patch)

Here are this week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health. No one hit over 100 points, but the Eataly kiosks in Flatiron had the highest violation score. (Patch)

The mayor is fighting back against allegations that his sudden embrace of restricting hotel development in the city has something to do with a presidential endorsement from the Hotel Trades Council union. (Politico)

Would you love to brunch at the new TWA Hotel but don’t want to travel like a peasant to get there? Well, now you can take a private helicopter to brunch from lower Manhattan. (Time Out)

After a few weeks of confusion, the state has clarified that landlords and brokers are both going to be held to the new $20 application fee limit. Before the ruling, agents were charging high fees because a landlord wasn’t allowed to. (Gothamist)

A man with a sword was arrested at the observation deck of the Empire State Building. (amNY)

It’s the kind of trash talk you need to see to believe. (@edenbrower)

Whoops, an NYPD school safety officer was arrested for possession of three pounds of marijuana. (SI Live)

Are you the person who bought a $10 million lotto ticket in the Bronx? (Welcome2TheBronx)

Sometimes trash is old food and mile-long CVS receipts. Sometimes it’s 20,000 slides of fashion shows from the 1980s. (Jezebel)

22 places for a stellar meal in Soho. (Eater)