The Briefly for January 28, 2020 – The “Is See Something, Say Something No Longer Adequate?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: City Council staff is a step closer to unionizing, Coronavirus, AOC quits the Sunnuyside Yards steering committee, the best fried rice dishes, and more

Today – Low: 31˚ High: 44˚
Clear throughout the day.

The Spotted Pig, as rumored over the weekend is closing. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Here’s how to get a half-priced MetroCard from the city’s Fair Fares program, if you qualify. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

It’s like a black and white cookie, but it’s a vegan milkshake with chocolate chips, black n’ white cake, whip cream and chocolate drizzle. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The MTA launched a new “Kindness. Respect. Solidarity.” campaign to encourage riders to report hate crimes, harassment or graffiti on the subways. This differs from the “See Something, Say Something” because for this campaign if you see something, you should… say something. (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

More than 400 City Council staffers seeking to unionize to improve working conditions asked Council Speaker Corey Johnson to recognize them on Monday. If Recognized, this would be the first independent unionized legislative staff in the country. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

10 secrets of the United Palace, Manhattan’s fourth largest theater, celebrating its 90th year. (Untapped New York)

The best mac and cheese on the Upper West Side. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Photos: Inside the Central Park Club, an exclusive 100th floor private club looking over Central Park. (alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Video: New Yorkers rescued a woman trapped under an SUV on Sunday night by “collectively lifting” it off the ground. The woman trapped under the SUV was not hurt. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

There have been no confirmed cases have been reported in New York , but five people are waiting for Coronavirus test results. Across the country 110 people in 26 states are being tested and there have been five confirmed cases. If you are experiencing fever, cough, or difficulty breathing and have traveled to the central Chinese region, please contact a doctor immediately. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Senator Chuck Schumer is demanding the federal government declare a state of emergency as the fifth confirmed case of the deadly coronavirus was found in the U.S. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

New York is the 15th most polluted city in the country. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

10 spots in the city to bring you back to relive the Roaring 20s, but without all the Diphtheria. (Lucie Levine for 6sqft)

RIP Jason Polan, an artist whose goal was to draw every person in NYC. I’ve long been enamored by his art and his story is one of those that I’ve always believed as one that made New York special. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The story of how mead went from the Renaissance Fair to city bars. (James Reddicliffe for NY Times)

For the second time in a week, the MTA is dealing with bed bugs at the 71st Avenue stop in Forest Hills. An exterminator crew was seen at a control tower on Monday night. (NY1)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is stepped down from the Sunnyside Yards steering committee because the city’s Economic Development Corporation is not including feedback from any of the meetings the EDC has had with the public. (Christian Murray for Jackson Heights Post)

Bernie Sanders is stuck in Washington for President Trump’s impeachment, so AOC stepped in to wow the crowds in Iowa. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Recovery has begun of the Museum of Chinese in America’s archives. Museum staff hasn’t been allowed inside the building, which suffered structural damage from the fire on Friday, but city workers are able to remove boxes from the former home of the archives. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The daily lineups of Governors Ball are available. Stevie Nicks is on Friday night. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Queens State Senator Jessica Ramos joined advocates in Albany on Monday to urge passage of a bill that would restrict how schools uses suspensions as part of an effort to end the school-to-prison pipeline. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewyork Metro)

Where to eat the city’s best fried rice dishes.(Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

The Briefly for January 7, 2020 – The “Saving Penn Station and a Guy on the BQE” Edition

Today’s daily NY news digest: Amazon’s HQ2 deal for LIC was $800 million sweeter than we previously knew, the Queens boro president special election date is set, and more

Today – Low: 32˚ High: 44˚
Possible light rain in the evening and overnight.

The first Monday of 2020 saw an unprecedented meltdown of the MTA’s ability to get us all to work. 12 of 22 possible subway lines were experiencing major delays. Happy Monday everyone! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

What caused the delays? In the 7 train’s case it was “an isolated case of human error.” Don’t forget that the MTA will still write you a late note for work if you ask for it. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

New York City’s greatest export is garbage. Literal garbage. In 2018, over 680 thousand tons (over 1.3 billion pounds) of garbage from NYC was exported to Seneca Meadows, NY, a 270+ mile drive from Manhattan. Over half a million tons were sent to Morrisville, PA, a 70+ mile journey. Businesses, stores and restaurants recycle 24% of the time, construction recycles 50%, and residential homes only hit 18% of a maximum 68%. The mayor promised to reduce the city’s trash exports by 90% in 2018 and trash exports went up in 2019. (Sally Goldenberg and Danielle Muoio for Politico)

Governor Cuomo has a plan for Penn Station. He plans to add 40% capacity to everyone’s favorite train station. The expansion of Penn Station into the Post Office building will do nothing to increase its capacity, so the governor plans to add eight tracks to service an additional 175,000 riders each day. This all hinges on the state buying or taking a city’s block worth of land between 30th and 31st between Seventh and Eighth Aves. That block is has businesses and apartments, and land owned by the Archdiocese of New York and Amtrak. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Perhaps the Penn Station expansion can help out New Jersey’s newest form of tourism: people taking a train from New York to make sports bets using their phones over the New Jersey border. (Christopher Palmeri for Bloomberg, thanks to reader Timothy for sending this in)

The governor had a busy day with his speech announcing the Penn Station upgrades followed by literally pulling a trapped man out of a crashed van on the BQE. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The governor isn’t the only good samaritan in the city. Shaq helped a woman who has fallen at the intersection of Pitt and East Houston. (EV Grieve)

What’s $800 million between a giant corporation that pays $0 in taxes and the City of New York? Turns out the sweet deal the mayor and governor tried to give Amazon had $2.5 billion of incentives, $800 more than previously reported. (The Real Deal)

Pro wrestling runs in Ridgewood’s roots. In the modern day, House of Glory calls it home, but the pedigree runs back to the New Ridgewood Grove Arena, the WWF, Bruno Sammartino and Andre the Giant. (The Old Timer for QNS)

Pier 76 sits behind the Javits Center and is currently an NYPD tow yard, but thanks to Governor Cuomo the pier will be added to the Hudson River Park Trust later this year. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

Food delivery workers with electric bikes had to worry about the NYPD confiscating their bikes as part of the mayor’s anti-electric bike crusade. Now, since September, 24 workers’ bikes have been stolen, each costing as much as $2,000. (Sarah Maslin Nir and Jeffrey E. Singer for NY Times)

Video: Walking through Yorkville, from 97th to 74th on York Ave. (ActionKid)

There are 12 Human Trafficking Intervention Courts in New York, aimed at intervention and sending people to counseling instead of prison. Six years into their operation, there is criticism that they are not living up to their promise. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Could you identify this tribute to the 1939 World’s Fair on a building in Queens without being told what it was? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Yes, this is a story about another ice skating rink in the city, but this one is a synthetic rink. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos: During the renovation of Moishe’s on Second Ave, removing some walls revealed beautiful 100-plus-year-old tile work behind the dummy walls constructed in the 70s. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Evictions are down nearly 20 percent since new rent laws were enacted last June. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

The Harvey Weinstein trial started on Monday. Always an imitator, Los Angeles announced its own case against Weinstein. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Anish Kapoor bean sculpture at 56 Leaonard’s construction continues as we’re currently at half bean. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

There will be a special election on March 24 to elect a new Queens borough president after former President Melinda Katz assumed her new position as Queens DA. (Loulou Chryssides for Give Me Astoria)

9 ways to embrace winter in Brooklyn. (Lore Croghan for Brooklyn Eagle)

Kal Penn, who recently starred in NBC’s ‘Sunnyside,’ endorsed City Councilperson Jimmy Van Bramer for Queens President. Penn was also the Associate Director in the White House Office of Public Engagement under the Obama administration. (Kristen Torres for LIC Post)

The husband to state Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie’s chief of staff was arrested Monday for conspiring to import cocaine, according to a source and court records. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Sometimes we can assume that New York has everything. When faced with the news that Sip N’ Play, a board game cafe, has opened in Park Slope, we can be sure we’ve hit all the checkmarks. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Quick tip: The NYPD is warning against abbreviated 2020 as “20” on checks, as it could be an invitation for fraud. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

A little bit more on some of the owners of land that Governor Cuomo wants to take to expand Penn Station. (Rich Bockmann and Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

The state’s new bail laws aren’t even a week old, but thanks to the recent anti-Semite attacks some state lawmakers are considering amending it so those accused of hate crimes could be held on bail. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

Where to have a last minute group dinner. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for November 7, 2019 – The “Lubing Up the Cube in Astor Place” Edition

A list of lying NYPD officers, low voter turnout in this year’s elections, no one wants to live in Turtle Bay, the best coffee shop in the US, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The sweet spot for rent in the city might be $2,700 and four other things you need to know about the city’s real estate market. (StreetEasy)

The life, death, and rebirth of the Orchard Street pedestrian mall, the only street in the city that closes on Sundays to become a pedestrian mall. (Bowery Boogie)

A look at how gentrification has changed Fort Greene. (NY Times)

How does the cube in Astor Place stay able to spin? It gets lubed. (EV Grieve)

Commercial rent control may be how the city fights the retail vacancy crisis. (Gothamist)

Death certificates for overdoses in New York state must state a type of opioid thanks to a bill signed into law by Governor Cuomo on Tuesday. (amNewYork)

“The Seated IV” from Wangechi Mutu, which sits outside the Met as part of the facade, will be on display until June, instead of coming to an end in January. (NY Times)

Gothamist/WNYC has been fighting to get the secret list that each of the five borough District Attorneys maintains of cops who have been accused of dishonesty. Thanks to a successful Freedom of Information request, a three-page list of liar cops from the Brooklyn DA’s office was released on Wednesday. (Gothamist)

Who wants to live in Turtle Bay or Midtown? That question might be harder to answer than you think. Of the entire city, those are the two neighborhoods with the most real estate price drops in October. (amNewYork)

The best restaurants in Inwood. (The Infatuation)

Not much of the city voted on Tuesday. Only 13.9% of registered voters actually voted. While early voting was supposed to make voting easier, the locations were limited to 33 across the entire city. The mayor is hoping to increase that number to 100 for the 2020 election. (amNewYork)

James O’Neill is leaving his commissionership with the NYPD for a security job at Visa. (Patch)

The best coffee shop in the USA is Sey Coffee on Grattan Street in Bushwick, according to Food & Wine magazine. (Patch)

The definitive guide to the Hudson Yards development boom. (Curbed)

A $50 million triplex penthouse on Central Park West, once belonging to Demi Moore and Bruce Willis, can be yours if you’ve got $50 million lying around. (StreetEasy)

The president will return to the city that hates him to kick off Monday’s Veteran’s Day parade in Manhattan. This just went from parade to shit show. (amNewYork)

Where to go for affogato, the city’s newest must-try dessert, vanilla gelato with espresso poured over it. (Eater)

The Long Island City Clock Tower is going to go through a restoration that will start and end next year. (LIC Post)

120,000 pounds of clothes were collected for donation at the start of the NYC Marathon, with those clothes going to Goodwill. Since 2012 a million pounds have been collected and donated. (amNewYork)

Once the L train’s signal updates are complete, the M train is the next line to be upgraded and inconvenienced by late-night service disruptions while they’re being installed. (amNewYork)

Billy Eichner remains the only person I want one of the hundreds that call Met Life Stadium home. (Gothamist)

The best restaurants in Sunnyside and Woodside. (Grub Street)