The Briefly for June 3, 2019 – The “Albany May Fail to Pass Gay and Trans Panic Ban for Pride” Edition

Moishe’s gets a new life, pre-K workers get a new deal, 57 early voting sites selected, the 25 most expensive homes for sale in the city, Anthony Bourdain day will be June 25, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Wu-Tang Ain’t Nothing To Fur With. (Patch)

Two bills that would ban the gay and trans panic defense (where a legal defense claiming someone else being LGBTQ caused them “extreme emotional disturbance”) are in danger of not passing in the legislature. It’s astounding that anything gets done in Albany. (Gothamist)

The city’s public defenders are demanding a raise, noting that the low pay from their job often forces them to get a second job to make ends meet. They are asking for $50 million to at least be on par with attorneys in the city’s Office of Corporate Counsel. The responsibility to allocate the funds belongs to our mayor, who would rather traipse around the country, pretending to be a presidential candidate. (Patch)

They start at $48 million. The 25 most expensive apartments in NYC. (Curbed)

What do you get with an $85 million home? For starters, two tickets to space. (Gothamist)

What to do and where to eat in Morris Park, east of the Bronx Zoo. (amNY)

Moishe’s Bake Shop, which has had more lives than a feral cat, will reopen after renovations are complete under new management and may potentially change the name to ‘Formerly Moishe’s’. (EV Grieve)

With Amazon searching for office space in Manhattan, it certainly seems that they didn’t need billions of dollars in tax incentives. There should be a lesson in there, but let’s not get our hopes up. (Slate)

George Catalano, the man caught on video attacking a Lyft driver, surrendered himself to the NYPD for reckless endangerment and assault. (Gothamist)

Chefs Eric Ripert and José Andrés announced a day of remembrance on June 25 to celebrate the life of the late, great Anthony Bourdain. (Grub Street)

Fordham University’s Rose Hill campus is home to the oldest seismic station in the United States. (Atlas Obscura)

Robin Russell-French has a bunch of walls and a desire to create the city’s next 5 Pointz. Will it be enough to lure artists to Sheepshead Bay? (Viewing NYC)

39 places for an outside date night. (The Infatuation)

What says “city park” quite like “mass gravesite with a million corpses buried by prisoners“? (6sqft)

Isaiah Thompson, the subway brake bandit, was charged with reckless endangerment and criminal trespass for creating 747 subway delay between March and May, add public lewdness charges to the pile for exposing himself to a platform of people in mid-May. (Gothamist)

The city is making changes to how pre-k teachers and childcare providers as paid, avoiding a strike. Pre-K for all is one of the mayor’s pet projects. (Chalkbeat)

The pros and cons of living in a doorman building. (StreetEasy)

The DailyMeal’s 75 best hole-in-the-wall restaurants include 21 from NYC. Highlights range from some unconventional picks to pizza staples to NYC standards. (Patch)

The West Village’s Barbuto is closed after fifteen years. This time rent is not to blame, it’s the new owner of the building who does not want a restaurant in that space. (Eater)

A veteran NYPD officer pleaded not guilty to charges that she schemed to murder her estranged husband and the young daughter of her boyfriend. (amNY)

The city’s Board of Elections added 57 early voting sites across the city, which still falls short of the 100 sites proposed by the mayor. Early voting for this fall’s election starts October 26. (Patch)

A look at the proposed BQX streetcar in its current proposed form. (amNY)

Can Sunset Park hold on to its manufacturing roots as the neighborhood is gentrifying? (Gothamist)

Mya Vizcarrondo-Rios jumped to her death from the roof of her Bronx apartment building in February after being bullied and sexually harassed by other students. A lawsuit from her parents claims the school regularly ignored her complaints. Members of the City Council are calling for a probe into what went wrong. (Patch)

The Brooklyn Jewish Children’s Museum has an interactive display wall outside the museum in Crown Heights and the NYPD’s Hate Crime Unit is investigating a message left on the wall stating “Hitler is coming.” (Gothamist)

Times Square is getting an pop-up Museum of Broadway in 2020. (amNY)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez worked as a waitress and bartender in a staged event at the Queensboro in Jackson Heights in support of a fair wage for tipped workers. (NY Times)

The case that Brad Lander, who represents Gowanus on the City Council, is making a bad faith promise with the rezoning around the Gowanus Canal. (Pardon Me For Asking)

13 new outdoor art installations not to miss in June. (Untapped Cities)

New Yorkers have never been shy about cursing in public. (Viewing NYC)

17 tropical restaurants and bars that feel like a vacation. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for May 6, 2019 – The “Oh No, He’s Actually Going to Run for President, Isn’t He” Edition

The mayor’s Vision Zero program is beginning to fail, the best tacos, Jagged Little Pill plans to bring people to theaters, teens attacked by acid, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes and diversions are minimally awful. (Subway Changes)

A review of Decade of Fire, playing at the Metrograph, which tackles the topic of the burning of the Bronx in the 70s and the organizations that rallied to rebuild when no one else would. (Curbed)

Oh god. He’s actually going to run for President, isn’t he? (Splinter)

How to spend 12 hours on Governors Island. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Jagged Little Pill, which may actually be a bad album, is coming to Broadway on November 3 at the Broadhurst Theatre. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The 10 oldest libraries in the city and their secret histories. (Untapped Cities)

Some teens threw a raucous party in the basement of an NYCHA development. The party ended when someone poured an acid-like liquid onto them from above. (NY Times)

Some people are happy with laundry machines in their building. Others get a million dollar yacht, who Rolls-Royces, a Lamborghini, a Hamptons house rental for a summer, and courtside Nets season tickets. Yes, all of those amenities are for one apartment. Welcome to the wildest luxuries for city homes. (Patch)

RIP Lew Fidler. Fidler was a Brooklyn politician, who was a champion for homeless youth in the city council, the environment, and LGBTQ youth. (Politico)

The top twelve brunch spots in the city. Let this serve as a reminder if you want to go anywhere for brunch this weekend. Mother’s Day approaches. (Patch)

Say hello to the city’s newest restaurants and bars. (amNY)

Scenes from the Union Square cannabis parade and rally from Saturday. (EV Grieve)

It took six years, but the Office of Emergency Management has unveiled lower Manhattan’s solution against a Hurricane Sandy-like storm has arrived. They’ll use… sandbags. Really big sandbags. This took six years. (NY Times)

Margaritaville is a state of mind, but it’s also going to be a resort on the corner of 40th and Seventh Ave. (New York YIMBY)

Katz’s has survived New York since 1888 and New Yorkers have survived Katz’s enormous sandwiches for just as long. I’ll have what she’s having. (Food Insider)

Mark your calendars, November 9 will be Wu-Tang Clan Day, and to celebrate you’ll be able to go to the corner of Targee Street and Vanderbilt Avenue in Staten Island, which is the Wu-Tang Clan District as of this weekend. (The Root)

RIP Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown, who died over the weekend due to Parkinson’s disease complications. Brown was the Queens District Attorney for nearly thirty years and had been on the judiciary since 1973, who had been on a leave of absence from the job since March. (QNS)

Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro, whose decisions are helping destroy the Amazon and whose racism, homophobia and bigotry tops any racist uncle you’ve got on Facebook, will skip the NYC gala in his honor after it had become clear that New Yorkers will tolerate a lot of punishment, but hosting him is a step too far. (NY Times)

Breathe easy, literally, if you take the L train, the first dust report is in and the concentration of silica dust is well below the benchmarks for dangerous exposure. (NY Times)

BreakfastClub founder and author of BREAKFAST: The Cookbook shares her favorite breakfasts in the city. (Time Out)

Where to have a graduation lunch or dinner. (The Infatuation)

It seems that Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero program has begun to fail. (amNY)

Youfeng Xu was killed crossing Seventh Avenue with the light in Sunset Park, the person behind the wheel of the truck was charged with failure to yield to a pedestrian and failure to exercise due care. (Streetsblog)

A three-year-old boy was killed while in a crosswalk in front of a stop sign by a van in Bath Beach last week on a street that the city has known to be dangerous for at least five years. The driver blamed the child’s death on his mother. (Gothamist)

Candy. Where do you get it? Anywhere? Wrong. You get it at Economy Candy. (ABC 7 NY)

Senior citizens outnumber millennials when it comes to renting apartments. (NY Times)

An ice cream parlor for humans and dogs. Yes, it’s in Bushwick, how did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

Here’s how New York’s proposed voter affiliation deadline change could help Bernie Sanders in the 2020 presidential election. (Gothamist)

35 outstanding tacos in NYC. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for April 11, 2019 – The “Not the Best Place to Live, Not Even Close” Edition

A Y2K-like bug brought down some of the city’s GPS systems, Pat Kiernan has a new podcast, MTA workers fight the upcoming L Project, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

New York’s favorite news anchor, Pat Kiernan, has a new podcast. (NY1)

The state senate unanimously passed the Religious Garb Act, which will allow the wearing of “any attire, clothing, or facial hair” protected under the Human Rights Law for religious purposes. (QNS)

US News & World Report released the 2019 best places to live and we’re… not #1. Are you insane? We’re 90 out of 125. If you want #1, go move to Austin. (NY Post)

Maybe traffic cameras should, you know, police traffic regulations. That’s what State Assembly Member Michael DenDekker is proposing by adding bicycle lane violations to what traffic cameras enforce. (Sunnyside Post)

Murderinos, this one has your name written all over it. An 80-year-old Queens man was arrested for a Virginia double murder from 1973. (Gothamist)

Turns out those protective sidewalk covers don’t do much when the whole damn building collapses on top of them. No one was hurt when it happened in Williamsburg, except a few cars and maybe a penny-farthing bicycle or unicycle. It’s Williamsburg after all. (Gothamist)

A pizzeria shakedown straight out of a Jon Stewart comedy routine, but it’s real and the “mobsters” are facing up to 20 years in prison. (Brooklyn Paper)

These marijuana entrepreneurs have HIGH hopes for legalization. Get it? HIGH HOPES! Ugh. (Gothamist)

What to see right now in the city’s art galleries. (NY Times)

A guided dumpling crawl through Queens. (Eater)

After 35 years, bookbook on Bleecker Street will be closing. In order to stay open, the store would need a rent reduction and in 2019, that ain’t happening. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The five best grilled cheeses in the city. (Thrillist)

Foreclosures in the Bronx are up 28% in the first quarter of 2019. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The city’s shortest bike lane has been found. (Brooklyn Paper)

This weekend’s “Blessing of the Rides” in Coney Island is a New York City annual tradition. Here’s what to expect from the egg cream christening to the blessing itself. (amNY)

A group of transit workers is calling the L Project’s (the new and crappy name for the non-shutdown) air quality into question with flyers saying the silica dust in the air is a danger to anyone who breathes it in. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn DA Eric Gonzalez’ office broke up a gun trafficking ring after an undercover detective purchased three dozen guns, including automatic weapons. (amNY)

The Harlem School of the Arts will undergo a $9.5 million renovation that will begin in August and update the brutalist style exterior of the building with a glass wall, and make other welcome improvements. (NY Times)

There is no law dictating that your apartment be 80% covered with rugs, but most leases include it in a clause. What are the consequences for not complying? Well, that’s a little harder to define. (StreetEasy)

A look inside Manhattan’s first Ikea. It looks a lot like an Ikea, but you’re gonna look anyway. (Curbed)

The inevitable lawsuit over the city’s vaccine mandate has arrived. (Gothamist)

Why is there a 3,000 square foot bounce house in Dumbo? Because art, of course. (Time Out)

NYC is being afflicted by a Y2K-esque bug in some of its GPS systems. This is a once every twenty year GPS reset and city officials are being very tight-lipped about it. (NY Times)

What’s going on with the smoldering anus in Union Square? (Gothamist)

Saturday is Record Store Day, the most important holiday for the vinyl obsessed and for record store owners across the city. (amNY)

A look at City Hall Station, the unused subway station where the 6 train turns around which shows the grandeur of how the subways could have been. (NY Times)

The best neighborhoods for college grads. (Localize Labs)

Is removing stops the right way to make a bus route faster? Consider the case of the M14. (Bowery Boogie)

An interview with Carlo Scissura, the head of the new BQE expert panel. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The best Easter brunch spots.

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.