The Briefly for August 12, 2019 – The “LaGuardia Airport: A Hellhole of Hellholes” Edition

Zombie homes, free subways and buses on holidays, the ultra-rich New Yorkers funding Trump’s campaign, the Islanders are leaving Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are extensive, double-check the trains before staying out late. (Subway Weekender)

The second phase of the Hudson Yards construction involves something pretty common to NYC: delays from the MTA. (6sqft)

A history, explanation, and timeline of the LaGuardia construction. (amNY)

Saying LaGuardia Airport sucks in 2019 is underselling the sheer nightmare that is trying to escape the city from an airport where 90% of people are using private transportation to get to. Thursday’s disaster scenario of people walking on the highways and ramps to catch their flights was blamed on it being of the 45 peak travel days for the summer. Between the MTA’s stellar track record for buses, the Port Authority’s control of the airport, the DOT’s control of the roads and individual airlines’ construction on terminals, this is a problem that will persist for years.

Where’s the governor on all of this? He’s called this whole mess “unavoidable,” while also taking no specific action to make traveling to the airport any less hellish. If you’re traveling on any of the 19 “peak” days in August, the Port Authority suggests leaving multiple hours earlier to account for the travel disaster waiting for you. (Gothamist)

The “zombie homes” in Sheepshead bay are becoming a real problem for the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York state has a case against ExxonMobil for misleading its shareholders by lying about knowledge of climate change as early as 1977, and now the state has caught ExxonMobil attempting to intimidate the witnesses. Opening statements are scheduled for October 23. (Inside Climate News)

If you’re the type of person who hates having money and loves martinis, maybe The Algonquin Hotel’s $10,000 martini is for you, which comes with a diamond ring. (Untapped Cities)

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade replaced animals from the Central Park Zoo with balloons in 1927. The company turned to Greenwich Villager Tony Sarg to create the first iconic balloons for the parade. (GVSHP)

Incomplete data and sporadic surveys make measuring storefront vacancies difficult, but a study from the Department of City Planning shows the problem doesn’t exist everywhere in the city. Jackson Heights has the lowest vacancy rate of the areas surveyed at 5.1% compared to Canal Street, which is at 25.9%. (Curbed)

The history of how a natural gas pipeline turned into a 30-mile offshore windfarm. (The Indypendent)

This week’s forced restaurant closures do not disappoint with two different places being closed by the Department of Health, both scoring over 100 violation points in the process. (Patch)

The worry over rentable Revel scooters in Brooklyn and Queens is just that, worry. The company’s mission enjoys rare support from both the Department of Transportation’s Polly Trottenberg and Transportation Alternatives, and if they proved to be dangerous, you’d be reading about the danger they pose to pedestrians in The Briefly on a regular basis. (NY Times)

These are the city’s top high schools. (Patch)

The city is transforming two East Harlem lots into all below-market-rate apartments with 30% set aside for the homeless as part of the East Harlem Housing Plan. (Curbed)

Does no one ride the subways on major holidays because the MTA cuts service or does the MTA cut service because no one rides the subways on holidays? City Councilmember Justin Brannan will propose a non-binding resolution to request the MTA offer free subway and bus service during New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day in a similar fashion to how parking meters are suspended on those days. The MTA is, of course, against anything that would promote more people to take the train or buses. (6sqft)

85% of people stopped for mass transit fare evasion are black or Latinx, which echoes the unmistakable racist enforcement of stop and frisk. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Islanders are getting a permanent home in Belmont Park with a 19,000 seat arena for the team is dead last when it comes to attendance figures for the last two seasons. (QNS)

A list of the 1% of the 1% of New York City that is fueling Trump’s reelection campaign. Of course, the city’s worst musician and Knicks owner James Dolan is on the list. (Gothamist)

The condo board of 25 Central Park West is asking neighbor buildings for money to continue to fight their lawsuit against a protected bike lane that could have saved the life of cyclist Madison Lyden. (Streetsblog)

Mike Chen is testing the six top burgers in the city, which will come out ahead? (Viewing NYC)

Already tired of the 2020 primary race among Democrats? Here is a list of possible 2021 hopefuls for NYC mayor. (amNY)

As Sunset Park becomes more popular thanks to a gentrifying neighborhood and Industry City, Third Avenue’s dangers become more pronounced. The death of Em Samolewicz is one of eight fatalities and 2,000 injuries on Third Ave since 2011. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A judge issued a stay and once again blocked the 14th St busway from becoming a reality. Every single headline about this story has used some variation of the phrase “slams brakes on” like it was legally mandated. (Downtown Express)

29% of the 15,500 structural components at subway stations were found to be worn or damaged, and that number is up since 2012. Comforting, right? (amNY)

Anti-ICE protestors shut down the West Side Highway at 26th St on Saturday for an hour. (Splinter)

Were you among the 10,253 people treated by the FDNY between 2011 and 2018 whose personal information, including social security number, was accidentally left on a hard drive and misplaced? (amNY)

The New York Philharmonic’s Free Fridays are returning, giving away tickets to people between 13 and 26 with an online reservation system. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jeffrey Epstein is dead of an apparent suicide, but the investigation into his crimes is not. The FBI and prosecutors will turn their attention to his accomplices. (NY Times)

The city’s 19th cyclist was killed by a teenage driver on Sunday in Midwood. (Brooklyn Paper)

City Hall Park is now adorned by “Estructuras Monumentales“, works by 104-year-old local artist Carmen Herrera and will be on display through November 8. (Downtown Express)

A deep look into Corey Johnson’s plans to kill the city’s car culture. (Gotham Gazette)

35 solid happy hours. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 19, 2019 – The “That’s Not Pizza, It’s A Strawberry Tart” Edition

The new head of the NYCHA is the highest paid city employee, the city okays six new LGBTQ landmarks, the MTA gets sued for its ad practices, and more in today’s daily NYC new digest,

2019 is the summer of the NYPL’s Bookmobile. The Bookmobile is making its debut this week, operating as a mobile library and offering all the same services. By the end of the summer, the NYPL will have three Bookmobiles. (Untapped Cities)

The Mermaid Parade is this weekend, here are the routes and street closures in the People’s Playground. (Curbed)

Dominique Ansel’s latest creation is here and boy is it an eye-roller. They’re tiramisu made to look like greek coffee cups, strawberry tarts that look like a slice of pizza, pavlova that looks like an everything bagel, and other twists on New York staples. (Time Out)

The new head of the NYCHA’s salary of $400,000 will make him the highest paid city official. Gregory Russ is going from the Minneapolis Housing Authority to the largest in the nation. The $400k salary is $231,000 higher than the last permanent head of the agency. (The City)

Three Lives, on the corner of Waverly and W 10th, has reopened after being closed by the Department of Buildings and having to sell books on the sidewalk. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

Someone left a life-like baby doll in Crocheron Park in Bayside, which triggered a full-on NYPD and FDNY response. (QNS)

DUMBO is celebrating the ten year anniversary of the Manhattan Bridge Archway becoming open to the public. Prior to its life as a plaza, it was used for Department of Transportation storage. (6sqft)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is covering up Marc Chagall’s “The Lovers” until Thursday in honor of World Refugee Day, to highlight what a world would look like without the art of refugees. (Gothamist)

Some suggestions for unofficial places to watch the July 4th fireworks. (Patch)

Add another entry to your list of unconventional museums in the city. Poster House is “the first museum in the United States dedicated exclusively to posters.” No word if there will be a blacklight and velvet section. (Untapped Cities)

Six of NYC’s historic LGBTQ sites are now city landmarks. The Gay Activists Alliance Firehouse, Caffee Cino, the LGBT Center, the Women’s Liberation Center, the James Baldwin Residence, and Audre Lorde’s Residence made the list. (Curbed)

The city’s critics seem to hate Au Cheval, but that isn’t slowing down people who willingly wait over an hour for a burger. (Grub Street)

Fighting back investors and developers, four areas of Sunset Park have received landmark designation from the Landmarks Preservation Commission, which will prevent demolition or large changes to the homes inside the landmark districts. Quick trivia: If you see a brown street sign instead of a green one, you’re in a historic district. (6sqft)

If someone visiting New York asked you how to get tickets to the Statue of Liberty, would you know how? Either buy them online or walk past the dozens of guys trying to sell you tickets all around Bowling Green and buy them at Castle Clinton. While the article is clearly an SEO play, it’s still something most New Yorkers probably didn’t know. (Curbed)

Where does the MTA draw the line with subway ads when it comes to sex? Boner pills, the Museum of Sex, breast implants, condoms, and Tinder all get the go ahead, but they draw the line with sex toys because they are a “sexually oriented business.” Dame Products is suing the MTA over their murky advertising rules. Somehow Tinder’s “DTF” campaign wasn’t about sex? (Patch)

A guide to the elections on June 25. (amNY)

An interview with State Senator Julia Salazar focused on real estate, which took place on the eve of the passage of the state’s new rent reform laws. (The Real Deal)

10 dishes under $20 to try in Hudson Yards. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio nominated Jeffrey Roth, a deputy commissioner for policy and external affairs at the TLC, to lead the Taxi & Limousine Commission in a pick that, in the early stages, seems relatively free of controversy. He must be approved by the City Council before taking the position (amNY)

The city is debating banning Foie Gras as part of a dozen animal welfare bills that were discussed this week. Earlier this year the US Supreme Court upheld California’s foie gras ban, so the legislative path is clear if the city wants to go down it. (amNY)

No one was as vocal a supporter for the death penalty for the Central Park Five than the current president of the United States. If you think he was apologetic when asked about it this week, I would like to sell you the Brooklyn Bridge. (NY Times)

10 walking tours that even New Yorkers will love. A lofty claim, but who wouldn’t be interested a Chinatown food tour, a speakeasy tour of the West Village, or a ghost tour of Greenwich Village? (6sqft)

There’s a new Frank Ape mural in the East Village, part of the 100 Gates Project. (EV Grieve)

10 summer bottomless brunch spots in Astoria. (hint: take the ferry there). (We Heart Astoria)

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The Briefly for June 18, 2019 – The “Please Insert A Floppy Disk to Upgrade the Subways” Edition

The Green Light bill passed, marijuana legalization, e-bikes and e-scooters are still up for grabs, the best restaurants in Chinatown and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The governor is adding 500 law enforcement officers to the subway to fight back against assaults and the MTA’s fear of fare evasion. (amNY)

This week in animals stopping the subways: a turkey stopped the N train in Sunset Park. (Brooklyn Paper)

The subway is powered by OS/2, IBM’s computer operating system that dates back to the early 90s. (Tedium)

I think we need a full ban on any helicopters going over Manhattan itself.” – Mayor de Blasio. (6sqft)

Staten Island is getting 77 “state-of-the-art” buses. So far the MTA’s overhaul in Staten Island has sped up the buses by 12%. Still short of the mayor’s 25% goal, but if it works in Staten Island, it has hopes in the rest of the city. (Curbed)

The ‘Renewable Rikers Act’ was introduced in the city council to transform Rikers into a renewable energy center, sponsored by Astoria’s Councilmember Costa Constanides and Helen Rosenthal. (Give Me Astoria)

It’s the summertime, so it’s time to look for some new cocktails. A look across the city’s bars at drinks like The Donkey Kong, A Song of Ice and Fire, The Canary, and any other drinks ith great names. (amNY)

The summer mosquito spraying is beginning. (Patch)

Are these sandwiches worth hour-long waits? Through July 13th, you’ve got your chance at Otto. (Gothamist)

I think I’m sort of a laid back, cool dude in a loose mood.” Governor Andrew “cool dude, loose mood” Cuomo. (@JimmyVielkind)

RIP Gloria Vanderbilt, fashion designer, socialite, and Anderson Cooper’s mother. (CNN)

Video: The story of the rise and fall of Anna Delvy, the socialite grifter. (Cheddar)

The Green Light bill, the bill that will provide undocumented immigrants the opportunity to have drivers licenses, is now the Green Light law. (NY Times)

Battery Park is built on a landfill, but in the late 70s and early years of the 80s, Battery Park was a beach. If you’ve never seen photos of Battery Park before Battery Park, it’s a wild sight. (NY Times)

Paul Manafort was scheduled to be moved to Rikers Island, Attorney General Bill Barr’s top deputy intervened. He’s likely to be held at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in lower Manhattan. (NY Times)

Ten secrets of Queens’ Fort Totten Park. (Untapped Cities)

Watch Dominique Ansel make his most popular item: the DKA. (Viewing NYC)

Brooklyn, are you ready for another special election next week? (The Brooklyn Reader)

Albany appears to be working at its hardest as the end of the legislative session is approaching. Legalizing electric bikes and scooters are on the docket. There are some peculiar exceptions in the bill, like no company can rent scooters in Manhattan and scooters would be banned from the Hudson River Greenway, but it’s a start. (Streetsblog)

The state’s legislative session is ending on Wednesday and lawmakers are described as “frantic” to pass marijuana legalization before their summer break. (NY Times)

Gem Spa on Second Ave and St Marks isn’t going anywhere. Despite “Everything Must Go!” signs, the owners have reassured the community that they are “very much open for business” and simply had to clear the sidewalk. (EV Grieve)

The ASPCA is scheduled to open three low-cost vet clinics in the city for people who can’t otherwise afford the care their companions may need. (amNY)

The city’s animal shelters were supposed to go “no kill” by 2015. So what happened? (Gothamist)

23 LGBT landmarks of the East Village and Noho. (6sqft)

There will be no subway disruptions during World Pride weekend on the 29th and 30th. (Gothamist)

“Avoid walking across the Brooklyn Bridge at sunset” and other tips from the New York Times on how to survive WorldPride weekend as one of the expected four million revelers. (NY Times)

The best restaurants in Chinatown. (The Infatuation)

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