The Briefly for January 31, 2019 – The “Amazon Threatens to Walk” Edition

Mayor de Blasio won’t stop talking about his fired staffer, the Winterfest saga continues, the unwilling public advocate candidate and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Winterfest organizer Lena Romanova used a pseudonym to harass vendors and the press. Complaints against Winterfest are being reviewed by the Brooklyn District Attorney’s office. (Brooklyn Eagle)

Brooklyn Assemblywoman Latrice Walker is a candidate for Public Advocate, even if she doesn’t want to be. (Gothamist)

Amazon plans to sponsor computer science classes in more than 130 of the city’s high schools. (TechCrunch)

Amazon executives have expressed frustration in private at their treatment in New York and made veiled threats of walking from their Long Island City plans during a three hour city council meeting. Maybe some computer classes weren’t enough to win over the long list of groups who are against HQ2. (NY Times)

Reminder: Google is building a $1 billion campus with no bargained tax breaks from the city or state. (NY Mag)

A ranked list of the city’s best matzoh ball soups. (Grub Street)

Watch a snowstorm kick the city’s ass for 30 minutes in this 29 second time-lapse. (@mattmfm)

The MoMA PS1 Skyspace is closed while the 5 Pointz construction obstructs a view of the sky that’s supposed to be completely unimpeded. (Curbed)

Take a look at the photo of the guy reviewing the place and ask yourself “Does this man look like he would enjoy himself a Taco Bell that serves booze?” (NY Post’s uptight Steve Cuozzo)

The city released a draft of Gowanus’ rezoning. Just try not to think about the decades old toilet that’s currently running through the neighborhood. (6sqft)

Watch the Queens president Melinda Katz’ State of the Borough 2019 address. (Melinda Katz)

A very small number of the 30,000 New Yorkers eligible for half priced MetroCards have signed up for the Fair Fares program. (Gothamist)

The city’s high school dropout rate hit a record low in 2018. (Chalkbeat)

How to watch next week’s the public advocate debate. (amNY)

“We’re not happy with the service. And we do owe the public an apology” MTA president Pat Foye. Pat Foye wins this week’s “no shit” award. (NY Post)

Mayor de Blasio can’t stop digging himself deeper when it come to his former aide fired after sexual harassment accusations. Now he’s blaming the governor of Montana. (NY Post)

16 date night restaurants in the East Village. (Eater)

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The Briefly for December 20, 2018 – The “Elon Musk Does Not Have An Office on the Lower East Side” Edition

The mayor supports legal pot, Amazon can’t save the BQX, WeWork may be headed for a rude awakening, three boozy Taco Bells are headed to Manhattan and more in todays daily NYC news digest.

If you’ve paid for Spectrum internet access, you are owed between $75 and $150. The $62.5 million direct refund is a result of Spectrum’s settlement with the NY Attorney General’s office. (Gothamist)

Plotting the city’s parks in the only universally understandable way: a subway-style map. (6sqft)

WeWork is growing at an alarming rate. Is the boom headed for a bust? (The Real Deal)

That “Boring” company on the Lower East Side isn’t Elon Musk, it’s an art installation that requires an appointment and an NDA. (Gothamist)

The mayor is throwing his weight behind legal marijuana with a 71-page report that also makes recommendations like a NYC sales tax, a minimum age of 21, encouraging diversity in the pot business, and more. (amNY)

If you missed the Nitehawk cinema opening in Park Slope, there are photos. (Brownstoner)

From 0 to 20 in 15 seconds! These new “faster” subways aren’t exactly… fast. (Curbed)

The site of the holy matrimony between Billy Joel and Christie Brinkley will become part of Amazon’s HQ2. (Untapped cities)

Why doesn’t NYC have micro-apartments like other cities? It’s all about the price per square foot. (StreetEasy)

The Frigid Fyre Fest has hit a new low. The WinterFest organizers are now threatening vendors who speak to the press. (Gothamist)

Landlords don’t like legislation that limits their ability to raise commercial rent. (The Real Deal)

The city’s worst landlord isn’t someone named Trump or Kushner, it’s the the city. (Curbed) An example? Meet the Moran family, who has been without heat for nearly 20 years. (NY Post)

Part bar, part retail and part… Taco Bell!? Yup, three boozy Taco Bells are headed for Manhattan so you can Live Más. (Eater)

Two bills are headed for City Council that could reshape safety in bars (and three Taco Bells in Manhattan) by making “harassment free” signage mandatory and mandatory sexual harassment prevention and intervention training for all nightlife security. (Brokelyn)

19 curries to try in NYC. (Eater)

The Brooklyn District Attorney is set to wipe out 1,400 warrants in misdemeanor weed possession cases and 28 convictions in the next 90 days. (NY Post)

The death of a woman found in the trash chute of a luxury building was ruled an accident. Here’s no answer about how it happened, but there is no suspicion of foul play. (NY Post)

The lawsuit preventing the American Museum on Natural History from expanding was appealed and construction is suspended until the case is settled. (Curbed)

Shekema Young, who was arrested for allegedly slashing two women on the bus, says she’s innocent and the two victims were threatening to take Miss Beezy, her shih tzu yorkie mix. (Gothamist)

The NYPD rescued a frightened and freezing kitten from the undercarriage a car. Nothing else, just some good news for your Thursday. (NY Post)

Even Amazon’s money can’t save the mayor’s pricey and ill-advised BQX streetcar plan. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York’s rape shield laws are supposed to protect victims, but in most cases it makes it “almost impossible to successfully prosecute rapists, let alone millionaire celebrity rapists” like Harvey Weinstein. (Gothamist)

The president and CEO of New York Public Radio, Laura R. Walker, will be stepping down after 23 years. Walker acknowledged during her time she prioritized growth over people, and the last year of her employ was highlighted with accusations of harassment and discrimination against hosts of popular shows. (NY Times)

The best bars in the city, according to Thrillist.

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